Catalogue

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Transition to capitalism? : the communist legacy in Eastern Europe /
János Mátyás Kovács, editor.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c1994.
description
xxiii, 323 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1560001674 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c1994.
isbn
1560001674 (cloth)
catalogue key
583192
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-02:
One constant in Eastern Europe is pessimism: Why have the various transitions been so disappointing? Although much light has been shed on such discredited systemic features of "the official legacy" as the obsolete industrial structures, huge state bureaucracies, and lack of entrepreneurial spirit, such nonsystemic features as the peaceful networks of informal business activity and the militant anticommunist political organizations have received much less attention. These "alternative legacies" have displayed their capacity to inhibit economic and political liberalization and cripple the movement toward capitalism and democracy. The 20 authors of the 18 essays herein have tried to interpret the alternative institutions, movements, ideologies, and values that allegedly contributed to the erosion of the communist regimes, striving to arrive at a new typology of the heritage--one that allows a few cautiously optimistic predictions to be made. The book covers the economic, political, and sociological dimensions of the transformation, and concludes with comparative observations on the basis of the Latin American and Southeast Asian experiences. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. B. B. Brown Jr.; Southern Oregon State College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The book covers the economic, political, and sociological dimensions of the transformation, and concludes with comparative observations on the basis of the Latin American and Southeast Asian experiences." --B. B. Brown Jr., Choice
"The book covers the economic, political, and sociological dimensions of the transformation, and concludes with comparative observations on the basis of the Latin American and Southeast Asian experiences." -B. B. Brown Jr., Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
This work observes how the political ideologies, social values, and theoretical paradigms of Eastern European scholars and politicians changed throughout the period of transformation following the 1989 political revolutions in Eastern Europe. The authors try to reinterpret the institutions, movements, and ideologies that allegedly contributed to the erosion of the old regimes in Eastern Europe, asking whether these--alternative--legacies of communism support the transition to capitalism.
Table of Contents
Contributors
Introduction: Official and Alternative Legacies
Modernity or a New Kind of Duality? Second Thoughts about the "Second Economy"p. 3
Planning the Transformation? (Notes about the Legacy of the Reform Economists)p. 21
Opposition against "Market Breakthrough Reforms" Revisitedp. 47
Paths of Extrication and Possibilities of Transformationp. 59
Path Dependence and Privatization Strategies in East Central Europep. 63
Transformative Politics: Social Costs and Social Peace in East Central Europep. 103
From Soft Communism to Post-Communism (Authoritarian Legacy and Democratic Transition in Hungary)p. 121
Is What Is Left Right? (The Yugoslav Heritage)p. 147
Poland After the Revolution - the Obfuscated Autonomy of Politicsp. 173
Conservatism in Central and Eastern Europep. 187
The Forgotten Legacy of Marginal Intellectualsp. 205
St. Peter and John Stuart Millp. 217
From Velvet Revolution to Velvet Divorce? (Reflections on Slovakia's Independence)p. 229
Social Change, Political Beliefs, and Everyday Expectations in Hungarian Society: A Comparative Viewp. 259
The Vulture and the Calamity (Or, Why Were Hungarian Taxi Drivers Able to Rebel?)p. 275
Observations on the Transition in East-Central Europep. 293
Watching Eastern Europe, Thinking about Latin Americap. 299
Cultural Legacies and Development: A View from East Asiap. 309
Name Indexp. 319
Subject Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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