Catalogue


War, state, and society in mid-eighteenth-century Britain and Ireland /
Stephen Conway.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006.
description
vi, 346 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199253757 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006.
isbn
0199253757 (alk. paper)
standard identifier
9780199253753 (alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- World-wide war and home defence -- War and the state -- The growth of the armed forces -- War and the economy -- War and society -- War and politics -- War and religion -- War and the nation -- War, empire, and the loss of America -- The view from the grassroots -- Comparisons historical and geographical.
catalogue key
5830740
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-333) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
...the distinctive strengths of this book are the range of sources, particularly local sources, consulted, and the willingness to include the 'view from the grassroots' when looking at the impact of conflict on individual communities.
Introduction 1. World-Wide War and Home Defence 2. War and the State 3. The Growth of the Armed Forces 4. War and the Economy 5. War and Society 6. War and Politics 7. War and Religion 8. War and the Nation 9. War, Empire, and the Loss of America 10. The View from the Grassroots 11. Comparisons Historical and Geographical Conclusions Bibliography Index
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The middle of the 18th century was a period of continuous warfare as Britain, and therefore Ireland, was involved in conflict with Spain and France. This text explores the impact of these wars and the consequences for the economy, society, politics, religious divisions, and attitudes to empire.
Long Description
This book explores the impact of the wars of 1739-63 on Britain and Ireland. The period was dominated by armed struggle between Britain and the Bourbon powers, particularly France. These wars, especially the Seven Years War of 1756-63, saw a considerable mobilization of manpower, materiel and money. They had important affects on the British and Irish economies, on social divisions and the development of what we might term social policy, on popular and parliamentary politics, onreligion, on national sentiment, and on the nature and scale of Britain's overseas possessions and attitudes to empire.To fight these wars, partnerships of various kinds were necessary. Partnership with European allies was recognized, at least by parts of the political nation, to be essential to the pursuit of victory. Partnership with the North American colonies was also seen as imperative to military success. Within Britain and Ireland, partnerships were no less important. The peoples of the different nations of the two islands were forced into partnership, or entered into it willingly, in order to fightthe conflicts of the period and to resist Bourbon invasion threats. At the level of 'high' politics, the Seven Years War saw the forming of an informal partnership between Whigs and Tories in support of the Pitt-Newcastle government's prosecution of the war. The various Protestant denominations -established churches and Dissenters - were brought into a form of partnership based on Protestant solidarity in the face of the Catholic threat from France and Spain. And, perhaps above all, partnerships were forged between the British state and local and private interest in order to secure the necessary mobilization of men, resources, and money.
Long Description
This book explores the impact of the wars of 1739-63 on Britain and Ireland. The period was dominated by armed struggle between Britain and the Bourbon powers, particularly France. These wars, especially the Seven Years War of 1756-63, saw a considerable mobilization of manpower, materiel and money. They had important affects on the British and Irish economies, on social divisions and the development of what we might term social policy, on popular and parliamentary politics, on religion, on national sentiment, and on the nature and scale of Britain's overseas possessions and attitudes to empire. To fight these wars, partnerships of various kinds were necessary. Partnership with European allies was recognized, at least by parts of the political nation, to be essential to the pursuit of victory. Partnership with the North American colonies was also seen as imperative to military success. Within Britain and Ireland, partnerships were no less important. The peoples of the different nations of the two islands were forced into partnership, or entered into it willingly, in order to fight the conflicts of the period and to resist Bourbon invasion threats. At the level of 'high' politics, the Seven Years War saw the forming of an informal partnership between Whigs and Tories in support of the Pitt-Newcastle government's prosecution of the war. The various Protestant denominations - established churches and Dissenters - were brought into a form of partnership based on Protestant solidarity in the face of the Catholic threat from France and Spain. And, perhaps above all, partnerships were forged between the British state and local and private interest in order to secure thenecessary mobilization of men, resources, and money.
Main Description
This book explores the impact of the wars of 1739-63 on Britain and Ireland. The period was dominated by armed struggle between Britain and the Bourbon powers, particularly France. These wars, especially the Seven Years War of 1756-63, saw a considerable mobilization of manpower, materieland money. They had important affects on the British and Irish economies, on social divisions and the development of what we might term social policy, on popular and parliamentary politics, on religion, on national sentiment, and on the nature and scale of Britain's overseas possessions andattitudes to empire.To fight these wars, partnerships of various kinds were necessary. Partnership with European allies was recognized, at least by parts of the political nation, to be essential to the pursuit of victory. Partnership with the North American colonies was also seen as imperative to military success.Within Britain and Ireland, partnerships were no less important. The peoples of the different nations of the two islands were forced into partnership, or entered into it willingly, in order to fight the conflicts of the period and to resist Bourbon invasion threats. At the level of 'high'politics, the Seven Years War saw the forming of an informal partnership between Whigs and Tories in support of the Pitt-Newcastle government's prosecution of the war. The various Protestant denominations - established churches and Dissenters - were brought into a form of partnership based onProtestant solidarity in the face of the Catholic threat from France and Spain. And, perhaps above all, partnerships were forged between the British state and local and private interest in order to secure the necessary mobilization of men, resources, and money.
Main Description
This book explores the impact of the wars of 1739-63 on Britain and Ireland. The period was dominated by armed struggle between Britain and the Bourbon powers, particularly France. These wars, especially the Seven Years War of 1756-63, saw a considerable mobilization of manpower, materiel and money. They had important affects on the British and Irish economies, on social divisions and the development of what we might term social policy, on popular and parliamentary politics, on religion, on national sentiment, and on the nature and scale of Britain's overseas possessions and attitudes to empire. To fight these wars, partnerships of various kinds were necessary. Partnership with European allies was recognized, at least by parts of the political nation, to be essential to the pursuit of victory. Partnership with the North American colonies was also seen as imperative to military success. Within Britain and Ireland, partnerships were no less important. The peoples of the different nations of the two islands were forced into partnership, or entered into it willingly, in order to fight the conflicts of the period and to resist Bourbon invasion threats. At the level of 'high' politics, the Seven Years War saw the forming of an informal partnership between Whigs and Tories in support of the Pitt-Newcastle government's prosecution of the war. The various Protestant denominations - established churches and Dissenters - were brought into a form of partnership based on Protestant solidarity in the face of the Catholic threat from France and Spain. And, perhaps above all, partnerships were forged between the British state and local and private interest in order to secure the necessary mobilization of men, resources, and money.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. v
List of Mapsp. viii
List of Figuresp. viii
List of Tablesp. viii
Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
World-Wide War and Home Defencep. 11
War and the Statep. 33
The Growth of the Armed Forcesp. 56
War and the Economyp. 83
War and Societyp. 115
War and Politicsp. 143
War and Religionp. 170
War and the Nationp. 193
War, Empire, and the Loss of Americap. 227
The View from the Grassrootsp. 253
Comparisons Historical and Geographicalp. 275
Conclusionsp. 302
Bibliographyp. 307
Indexp. 335
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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