Catalogue


A. Philip Randolph : the religious journey of an African American Labor Leader /
Cynthia Taylor.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2006.
description
xii, 291 p.
ISBN
0814782876 (alk. paper), 9780814782873 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2006.
isbn
0814782876 (alk. paper)
9780814782873 (alk. paper)
contents note
One of the sons of African Methodism -- The messenger : a forum for liberal religion -- The Brotherhood : religion for the working class -- The 1940s march on Washington Movement : experiments in prayer -- Protests, liberation theology, and Gandhian Satyagraha -- The miracle of Montgomery.
catalogue key
5827950
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An interesting historical record, edited with great sensitivity . . . . [Lister] reveals her lesbian affairs with remarkable honesty, offering a rare insight into the mores of the time." - Sunday Independent
"An interesting historical record, edited with great sensitivity...[Lister] reveals her lesbian affairs with remarkable honesty, offering a rare insight into the mores of the time." - Sunday Times
"As a document of one woman's revolt against conventions and as a celebration of love between women, this is an uplifting book." - The Independent
"Finally we have a book that seriously examines the religious views of one of the most important figures in modern American history as well as the black freedom struggle."
( "Finally we have a book that seriously examines the religious views of one of the most important figures in modern American history as well as the black freedom struggle." )-(Clarence Taylor),(author of Black Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the Twenty-first Century )
"Possessing 'a passion for progressive religion' (p. xi) herself, Cynthia Taylor is keen to find and trace this quality in her study of religion and A. Philip Randolph."
( "Possessing 'a passion for progressive religion' (p. xi) herself, Cynthia Taylor is keen to find and trace this quality in her study of religion and A. Philip Randolph." )-( American Historical Review ),()
"Taylor provides intriguing insights on dynamics of social gospel thought and activity in twentieth-century sociopolitical and economic struggle."
("Taylor provides intriguing insights on dynamics of social gospel thought and activity in twentieth-century sociopolitical and economic struggle." )-(The Journal for American History),()
"These remarkable diaries, a veritable Roseta Stone of lesbian life in the early nineteenth century, tell the story of the life and loves of Anne Lister, a outwardly conventional upper-class Englishwoman, who, from adolescence onward, was involved in a succession of passionate affairs with other women. Composed in a secret cipher - a kiss is Lister's codeword for orgasm, as in Two kisses last night, one almost immediately after the other, before we went to sleep- and ably decoded by Helena Whitbread, who spent six years editing them, the diaries trace not only Lister's relationships, but her attempts at self-definition and her strikingly confident and guilt free outlook. Lister's account of her daily life and her sometimes snobbish, but always compelling and unflinching commentary about the failings and shortcomings of her friends and acquaintances only add to the book's readability. One may take delight in what is here: the souvenir of an unabashed and often triumphant erotic life . . . . Rediscovered after nearly two hundred years, the story of [Anne Lister's] desire--and of the comic, gallant ways in which she satisfied it--seems especially poignant . . . . What Lister's diary suggests is that . . . the passion women find together has always existed, and we have only now begun to uncover its remarkable, lyrical history." - The Women's Review of Books
"...the souvenir of an unabashed and often triumphant erotic life, rediscovered after nearly two hundred years, the story of [Anne Lister's] desire- and of the comic, gallant ways in which she satisfied it-seems especially poignant...the passion women find together has always existed, and we have only now begun to uncover its remarkable, lyrical history. " - The Women's Review of Books
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Scholarship has portrayed A. Philip Randolph, an African American trade unionist as an atheist and anti-religious. Taylor places him within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion.
Long Description
"Finally we have a book that seriously examines the religious views of one of the most important figures in modern American history as well as the black freedom struggle." -- Clarence Taylor, author ofBlack Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the Twenty-first Century A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as "the most dangerous black man in America," he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His proteg? Bayard Rustin noted that, "With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King." Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Long Description
Thought to be an atheist, Taylor demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying from his African Methodist roots.
Main Description
A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as "the most dangerous black man in America," he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His proteg Bayard Rustin noted that, "With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King." Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Main Description
A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as "the most dangerous black man in America," he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His protegé Bayard Rustin noted that, "With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King." Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Main Description
A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as "the most dangerous black man in America," he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His protegé Bayard Rustin noted that, "With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King."Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Main Description
Finally we have a book that seriously examines the religious views of one of the most important figures in modern American history as well as the black freedom struggle. -Clarence Taylor, author of Black Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the Twenty-first Century A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as the most dangerous black man in America, he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His proteg? Bayard Rustin noted that, With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King. Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Main Description
Finally we have a book that seriously examines the religious views of one of the most important figures in modern American history as well as the black freedom struggle.-Clarence Taylor, author ofBlack Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the Twenty-first CenturyA. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as "the most dangerous black man in America," he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His proteg? Bayard Rustin noted that, "With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King."Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Main Description
Upon publication, the first volume of Anne Lister's diaries, I Know My Own Heart , met with celebration, delight, and some skepticism. How could an upper class Englishwoman, in the first half of the nineteenth century, fulfill her emotional and sexual needs when her sexual orientation was toward other women? How did an aristocratic lesbian manage to balance sexual fulfillment with social acceptability? Helena Whitbread, the editor of these diaries, here allows us an inside look at the long-running love affair between Anne Lister and Marianna Lawton, an affair complicated by Anne's infatuation with Maria Barlow. Anne travels to Paris where she discovers a new love interest that conflicts with her developing social aspirations. For the first time, she begins to question the nature of her identity and the various roles female lovers may play in the life of a gentrywoman. Though unequipped with a lesbian vocabulary with which to describe her erotic life, her emotional conflicts are contemporary enough to speak to us all. This book will satisfy the curiosity of the many who became acquainted with Lister through I Know My Own Heart and are eager to learn more about her revealing life and what it suggests about the history of sexuality.
Unpaid Annotation
"Finally we have a book that seriously examines the religious views of one of the most important figures in modern American history as well as the black freedom struggle." -Clarence Taylor, author of Black Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the Twenty-first Century A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as "the most dangerous black man in America," he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His proteg Bayard Rustin noted that, "With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King." Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph's religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: The Religious Journey of A. Philip Randolphp. 1
One of the Sons of African Methodismp. 7
The Messenger: A Forum for Liberal Religionp. 37
The Brotherhood: Religion for the Working Classp. 85
The 1940s March on Washington Movement: Experiments in Prayer Protests, Liberation and Black Theology, and Gandhian Satyagrahap. 128
The Miracle of Montgomeryp. 176
Epilogue: The Old Gentlemanp. 221
Notesp. 227
Selected Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 273
About the Authorp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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