Catalogue


A great and noble scheme : the tragic story of the expulsion of the French Acadians from their American homeland /
John Mack Faragher.
imprint
New York : Norton, 2006.
description
xx, 562 p., [16] p. of plates. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0393328279 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Norton, 2006.
isbn
0393328279 (pbk.)
contents note
L'ordre de bon-temps : the French arrival in l'Acadie, 1604-1616 -- Seigneurs et roturiers : the birth of the Acadian people, 1614-1688 -- Cunning is better than force : life in the borderland, 1671-1696 -- Nos amis les ennemis : the English conquest, 1696-1710 -- The meadows of l'Acadie : imperial designs and Acadian desires, 1710-1718 -- "To gett them over by degrees" : controversy over the oath, 1718-1730 -- The French neutrals : years of Acadian prosperity, 1730-1739 -- Plac'd between two fires : Paul Mascarene and imperial war, 1739-1747 -- Discord and desolation : British buildup, 1748-1753 -- Driven away by fire and sword : the siege of Beauséjour, December 1753-july 1755 -- Driven out of the country : the decision to remove the Acadians, june-july 1755 -- Gone, all gone: the expulsion, August-December 1755 -- Removed to a strange land : the exiles, 1755-1758 -- Chasse à mort! : the refugees, 1756-1760 -- The rays of the morning : end of the removal era, 1760-1785 -- Le grand dérangement : memory and history.
catalogue key
5819288
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-01-01:
"We are now upon a great and noble scheme of sending the neutral French out of this province, who have always been our secret enemies," wrote the The Pennsylvania Gazette in September 1755. The noble scheme was the deportation of the Acadians from Nova Scotia, which Longfellow made the subject of his short epic, Evangeline. Faragher (Yale Univ.) offers a readable and fair account of what happened. Acadia became part of New England by the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, and the Acadians had a year to leave and join the new French settlements at Louisbourg on the Gulf of St. Lawrence or Prince Edward Island. Most, however, wanted to stay; Britain did not want them to go, and seemed satisfied with a conditional oath of allegiance. But Britain's own Colonies saw the Acadians as enemies, and when the French and Indian War broke out, America's first case of ethnic cleansing got under way, carried out mostly by Colonial militia, but in the name of King George II, who takes the blame in Longfellow's Evangeline. In 1764, the Acadians were allowed to return, and in 2003, the Acadians received a royal apology. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. J. A. S. Evans emeritus, University of British Columbia
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Delves deeply and with rueful wisdom into a terrible crime perpetrated by European imperialists and American colonists."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
"Altogether superb...a worthy memorial to the victims of two and a half centuries past."--"Kirkus Reviews," starred review In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality--to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England--had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native Mkmaq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it. 40 illustrations, 6 maps.
Main Description
"Altogether superb...a worthy memorial to the victims of two and a half centuries past."--Kirkus Reviews, starred review In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality--to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England--had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native Mìkmaq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it. 40 illustrations, 6 maps.
Main Description
IN 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance.The right of neutrality'o live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England'had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native M'maq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it.
Main Description
IN 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality'o live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England'had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native M'maq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it.
Main Description
In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality; to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England; had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native Mìkmaq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it.
Main Description
In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality; to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and Engl∧ had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native M kmaq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it.
Unpaid Annotation
"Altogether superb...a worthy memorial to the victims of two and a half centuries past."--Kirkus Reviews, starred review In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality--to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England--had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native M­aq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it. 40 illustrations, 6 maps.

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