Catalogue


Bitter harvest : the social transformation of Morelos, Mexico, and the origins of the Zapatista revolution, 1840-1910 /
Paul Hart.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2005.
description
xi, 291 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826336639 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2005.
isbn
0826336639 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5817973
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-278) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paul Hart is associate professor of history at Texas State University, San Marcos
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-10-01:
Although the encroachment of capitalistic development reinforced by federal and state officials on the traditional communal lifestyle of a disenfranchised peasantry in Morelos is not a new topic, assessing its development from the 1840s to the 1910-20 revolution fills significant gaps in 19th-century Mexican studies. Hart (Texas State Univ., San Marcos) convincingly explains the historical relationship between the 19th-century caudillo Juan Alvarez, whose Ayutla revolt ousted Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and the revolutionary martyr Emiliano Zapata. Both men fought for more equitable landownership based on the historical rights of the pueblos, and recognized the significance of protecting local political autonomy. More importantly, popular participation among the rural population motivated by various factors intertwined with national watershed events such as the 1846-48 US invasion, 1861-67 French occupation, and a growing comprehension of liberal ideology, demonstrated that campesinos understood the political climate. Local politics frequently determined what side a village or individual campesino chose in the struggles between conservatives versus liberals, and also within liberal conflicts such as Porfirio Diaz's revolts against the Benito Juarez and Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada administrations. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and graduate students. J. R. Aguila University of Texas of the Permian Basin
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Between 1910 and 1919, Morelos, Mexico, was home to a bloody agrarian revolution that saw government troops burn villages, cities stand abandoned, and two of every five people either flee the fighting or die in it.
Long Description
Between 1910 and 1919, Morelos, Mexico, was home to a bloody agrarian revolution that saw government troops burn villages, cities stand abandoned, and two of every five people either flee the fighting or die in it. The conflict came in response to an intense economic transformation that changed the regions peasant economy into the hub of the Mexican sugar industry during the nineteenth century.By focusing on the creation of the rural working class in Morelos, "Bitter Harvest" argues that developments there reflected a broader pattern shared with other parts of Mexico that erupted in revolution. The volatile nature of the sugar industry in Morelos, and the silver and cattle industries of the North, exacerbated the social problems created by an exclusionary political regime. Soon, displaced peasants, small farmers, disgruntled ranch hands, and unemployed miners joined Francisco Villa in northern Mexico, while peasants, farmers, and sugar workers rallied around the leadership of Emiliano Zapata in Morelos. When President Porfirio Daz and the revolutionary leaders that came after him resisted the call for deep social change, turmoil engulfed much of the nation for the next decade. In the end, the Zapatistas were defeated militarily, yet they still forced major concessions out of the national government, which helped shape Mexican society for the rest of the twentieth century.
Main Description
Between 1910 and 1919, Morelos, Mexico, was home to a bloody agrarian revolution that saw government troops burn villages, cities abandoned, and two of every five people either flee the fighting or die in it. The region's conflict came in response to a dramatic economic transformation from a peasant economy to the hub of Mexico's sugar industry during the nineteenth century.
Main Description
Between 1910 and 1919, Morelos, Mexico, was home to a bloody agrarian revolution that saw government troops burn villages, cities stand abandoned, and two of every five people either flee the fighting or die in it. The conflict came in response to an intense economic transformation that changed the region's peasant economy into the hub of the Mexican sugar industry during the nineteenth century. By focusing on the creation of the rural working class in Morelos, 'Bitter Harvest' argues that developments there reflected a broader pattern shared with other parts of Mexico that erupted in revolution. The volatile nature of the sugar industry in Morelos, and the silver and cattle industries of the North, exacerbated the social problems created by an exclusionary political regime. Soon, displaced peasants, small farmers, disgruntled ranch hands, and unemployed miners joined Francisco Villa in northern Mexico, while peasants, farmers, and sugar workers rallied around the leadership of Emiliano Zapata in Morelos. When President Porfirio Díaz and the revolutionary leaders that came after him resisted the call for deep social change, turmoil engulfed much of the nation for the next decade. In the end, the Zapatistas were defeated militarily, yet they still forced major concessions out of the national government, which helped shape Mexican society for the rest of the twentieth century.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 1
The Land and the Peoplep. 11
Cultural Competition and the Struggle for Independencep. 23
The U.S. Invasion, National Defense, and Local Meaning, 1846-1856p. 41
Contested Visions: Elite Discourse and Agrarian Insurrection, 1856-1861p. 77
Civil War, the French Intervention, and Social Banditryp. 99
Apatlaco and the Morelos Countryside: Defining Citizenship and Creating a Nationp. 119
Poverty and Progress, 1876-1910p. 145
Social Costs of Overproduction and the Origins of the Morelos Revolutionp. 171
The Zapatista Revolutionp. 193
Conclusionp. 223
Appendixp. 229
Glossaryp. 240
Notesp. 241
Bibliographyp. 270
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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