Catalogue


The captive woman's lament in Greek tragedy /
Casey Dué.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2006.
description
viii, 189 p.
ISBN
0292709463 (cl. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2006.
isbn
0292709463 (cl. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5816757
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Casey Due is Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Houston
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-09-01:
Expanding on the work of Nicole Loraux, Margaret Alexiou, and others, Due (Univ. of Houston) focuses on the laments of captive women in Greek tragedy, especially Euripides. She discusses the origins of tragic lamentation in Homer, and even in the pre-Homeric tradition, arguing that throughout antiquity lamentation offered a unique way for women to have an approved voice in Greece. Due's main contribution is her claim that tragic lamentation revealed an ability on the part of Greek authors, actors, and audiences to empathize with enemies and foreigners, even while finding fault with them. The author offers sensitive readings of several Homeric passages and provides thoughtful and persuasive discussions of Aeschylus' Persians and Euripides' Hecuba, Trojan Women, and Andromache. Although its topic is somewhat specialized, the book is clear and accessible; all Greek is translated. This book will be useful to those interested in tragedy, Homeric epic, and women in the Greek world. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. E. Goins McNeese State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2006
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Summaries
Main Description
The laments of captive women found in extant Athenian tragedy constitute a fundamentally subversive aspect of Greek drama. In performances supported by and intended for the male citizens of Athens, the songs of the captive women at the Dionysia gave a voice to classes who otherwise would have been marginalized and silenced in Athenian society: women, foreigners, and the enslaved. The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy addresses the possible meanings ancient audiences might have attached to these songs. Casey Dué challenges long-held assumptions about the opposition between Greeks and barbarians in Greek thought by suggesting that, in viewing the plight of the captive women, Athenian audiences extended pity to those least like themselves. Dué asserts that tragic playwrights often used the lament to create an empathetic link that blurred the line between Greek and barbarian.After a brief overview of the role of lamentation in both modern and classical traditions, Dué focuses on the dramatic portrayal of women captured in the Trojan War, tracing their portrayal through time from the Homeric epics to Euripides' Athenian stage. The author shows how these laments evolved in their significance with the growth of the Athenian Empire. She concludes that while the Athenian polis may have created a merciless empire outside the theater, inside the theater they found themselves confronted by the essential similarities between themselves and those they sought to conquer.
Main Description
The laments of captive women found in extant Athenian tragedy constitute a fundamentally subversive aspect of Greek drama. In performances supported by and intended for the male citizens of Athens, the songs of the captive women at the Dionysia gave a voice to classes who otherwise would have been marginalized and silenced in Athenian society: women, foreigners, and the enslaved. The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy addresses the possible meanings ancient audiences might have attached to these songs. Casey Dué challenges long-held assumptions about the opposition between Greeks and barbarians in Greek thought by suggesting that, in viewing the plight of the captive women, Athenian audiences extended pity to those least like themselves. Dué asserts that tragic playwrights often used the lament to create an empathetic link that blurred the line between Greek and barbarian. After a brief overview of the role of lamentation in both modern and classical traditions, Dué focuses on the dramatic portrayal of women captured in the Trojan War, tracing their portrayal through time from the Homeric epics to Euripides' Athenian stage. The author shows how these laments evolved in their significance with the growth of the Athenian Empire. She concludes that while the Athenian polis may have created a merciless empire outside the theater, inside the theater they found themselves confronted by the essential similarities between themselves and those they sought to conquer.
Main Description
The laments of captive women found in extant Athenian tragedy constitute a fundamentally subversive aspect of Greek drama. In performances supported by and intended for the male citizens of Athens, the songs of the captive women at the Dionysia gave a voice to classes who otherwise would have been marginalized and silenced in Athenian society: women, foreigners, and the enslaved.The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedyaddresses the possible meanings ancient audiences might have attached to these songs. Casey Dueacute; challenges long-held assumptions about the opposition between Greeks and barbarians in Greek thought by suggesting that, in viewing the plight of the captive women, Athenian audiences extended pity to those least like themselves. Dueacute; asserts that tragic playwrights often used the lament to create an empathetic link that blurred the line between Greek and barbarian. After a brief overview of the role of lamentation in both modern and classical traditions, Dueacute; focuses on the dramatic portrayal of women captured in the Trojan War, tracing their portrayal through time from the Homeric epics to Euripides' Athenian stage. The author shows how these laments evolved in their significance with the growth of the Athenian Empire. She concludes that while the Athenian polis may have created a merciless empire outside the theatre, inside the theatre they found themselves confronted by the essential similarities between themselves and those they sought to conquer.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Casey Dué presents a study of captive women's laments that shows how classical dramatists used empathy to pierce the barrier between the Greek and barbarian worlds.
Long Description
The laments of captive women found in extant Athenian tragedy constitute a fundamentally subversive aspect of Greek drama. In performances supported by and intended for the male citizens of Athens, the songs of the captive women at the Dionysia gave a voice to classes who otherwise would have been marginalized and silenced in Athenian society: women, foreigners, and the enslaved. The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy addresses the possible meanings ancient audiences might have attached to these songs. Casey Dueacute; challenges long-held assumptions about the opposition between Greeks and barbarians in Greek thought by suggesting that, in viewing the plight of the captive women, Athenian audiences extended pity to those least like themselves. Dueacute; asserts that tragic playwrights often used the lament to create an empathetic link that blurred the line between Greek and barbarian. After a brief overview of the role of lamentation in both modern and classical traditions, Dueacute; focuses on the dramatic portrayal of women captured in the Trojan War, tracing their portrayal through time from the Homeric epics to Euripides' Athenian stage. The author shows how these laments evolved in their significance with the growth of the Athenian Empire. She concludes that while the Athenian polis may have created a merciless empire outside the theater, inside the theater they found themselves confronted by the essential similarities between themselves and those they sought to conquer.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Men's Songs and Women's Songsp. 30
Identifying with the Enemy: Love, Loss, and Longing in the Persians of Aeschylusp. 57
Athenians and Trojansp. 91
The Captive Woman's Lament and Her Revenge in Euripides' Hecubap. 117
A River Shouting with Tears: Euripides' Trojan Womenp. 136
The Captive Woman in the House: Euripides' Andromachep. 151
Conclusion: The Tears of Pityp. 163
Bibliographyp. 169
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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