Catalogue


Encyclopedia of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era /
edited by John D. Buenker and Joseph Buenker.
imprint
Armonk, NY : Sharpe Reference, c2005.
description
3 v. (xxxii, 1256 p.) : ill. ; 29 cm.
ISBN
0765680513 (set : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Armonk, NY : Sharpe Reference, c2005.
isbn
0765680513 (set : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5808958
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-01-01:
Covering the period in American history from 1877 through 1920, this is truly "the first reference work to treat those forty-plus years as a single historical epoch in which the organizing theme is the emergence of the United States as a modern, urban, industrial, multiethnic world power." While succeeding in doing that, it does not slight the agricultural and more traditional aspects then still influential in American society. This father-and-son editorial team of professional historians enlisted the help of 210 contributing authors, both academicians and independent scholars. They in turn produced nearly 900 alphabetically arranged entries on people, places, organizations, and events, supplemented by 17 thematic essays. The diversity in writers, all possessing an analytical rigor, lends a lively difference in presentation. Less than full-page, shaded sidebars focusing on discrete stories such as creative toys, the saga of Joe Hill, and the Gibson Girl are especially inviting to younger readers and quite appropriate for a work that endeavors to emphasize social and popular cultural history over governmental and political themes. Researchers seeking primary source documentation are offered material such as the party platforms of third parties and significant court decisions. Photographs and drawings displayed on nearly every other page pleasantly break up the text. Brief bibliographical and see also references follow each segment, and a more comprehensive bibliography of printed works concludes this work. The general and biographical indexes are reproduced at the end of each volume for easy access to the entries. Even in a work comprising more than 1,250 pages, some things will inevitably be left out. Nevertheless, with its pleasing, easy-to-read type, this encyclopedia is an indispensable reference source for all historical collections. Acquisitions librarians can be assured that readers of many different ages and educational levels will use it. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. F. J. Augustyn Jr. Library of Congress
Appeared in Library Journal on 2006-01-01:
Editors John D. Buenker (history, emeritus, Univ. of Wisconsin, Parkside; Historical Dictionary of the Progressive Era) and son Joseph (assistant librarian, Arizona State Univ. Lib.) compiled this three-volume encyclopedia, which boasts the contributions of more than 200 scholars of the titular period, defined here as ranging from the end of Reconstruction (1877) to the "return to normalcy" (1920). Seventeen thematic essays (e.g., "Technology and Systematization," "The Economy"), each approximately 3000 words long, analyze the socioeconomic, cultural, religious, and political events that influenced the time and provide an excellent foundation for the 900-plus A-to-Z entries that follow. These entries include not only people but also a wide range of topics, from the Abbott sisters (Edith and Grace) to Zionism. Every essay and entry is followed by a brief bibliography. In addition, there are nearly 50 sidebars and more than 200 photographs and other graphics that add a cultural or human-interest aspect. Volume 3 contains 100 primary-source documents, a year-by-year chronology, and additional bibliographic references. Bottom Line This reference tool provides an excellent overview of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era and will allow high school students, undergraduates, and the general public to learn more about this exciting period of American history. It would make an excellent addition to high school media centers as well as to undergraduate and public libraries.-Diane Fulkerson, Univ. of West Georgia Lib., Carrollton (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
School Library Journal,
Booklist, December 2005
Choice, January 2006
Library Journal, January 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Extending from the 1870s to World War I, the Gilded Age and Progressive Era mark a major turning point in American history. During this colorful period the country transformed itself from an isolated, rural, agricultural nation into an urban, industrial, multicultural world power. It was an era marked by bigness: Big Business, Big Labor, and big ideas. These forces changed people's everyday lives as a technical revolution swept the country, giving birth to such inventions as the telephone, light bulb, automobile, airplane, radio, and motion pictures. It was also an era punctuated by disasters such as the Chicago Fire, the Johnstown Flood, and the San Francisco Earthquake, as well as two presidential assassinations. The same era brought us ragtime, vaudeville, Coney Island, and Major League Baseball. Symbolized by larger-than-life figures-Teddy Roosevelt, John D. Rockefeller, Mark Twain, Emma Goldman, and W.E.B. Du Bois to name just a few-the Gilded Age and Progressive Era set the stage for the United States to become the world's industrial powerhouse and gave birth to the modern world. This illustrated encyclopedia provides definitive coverage of all the social and cultural developments of the period as well as its political and economic history. Edited by distinguished historian John D. Buenker and Joseph Buenker, the set features numerous original documents, sidebars, and in-depth essays on major themes and developments, as well as nearly 900 detailed A-Z entries on issues, events, people, and ideas.
Bowker Data Service Summary
No further information has been provided for this title. .
Main Description
Extending from the 1870s to World War I, the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era mark a a major turning point in American history. During this colorful period the country transformed itself from an isolated, rural, agricultural nation into an urban, industrial, multicultural world power. It was an era marked by bigness : Big Business, Big Labor, and big ideas. These forces changed people's everyday lives as a technical revolution swept the country, giving birth to such inventions as the telephone, light bulb, automobile, airplane, radio, and motion pictures. It was an era punctuated by disasters such as the Chicago Fire, the Johnstown Flood, and the San Francisco Earthquake, as well as two presidential assassinations. The same era also brought us ragtime, vaudeville, Coney Island, and Major League Baseball. Symbolized by larger-than-life figures--Teddy Roosevelt, John D. Rockefeller, Mark Twain, Emma Goldman, and W.E.B. Du Bois to name just a few--the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era set the stage for the United States to become the world's industrial powerhouse and gave birth to the modern world. This illustrated encyclopedia provides definitive coverage of all the social and cultural developments of the period as well as its political and economic history. Edited by distinguished historian John Buenker and librarian Joseph Buenker, the set features original documents, sidebars, and in-depth essays on major themes and developments, as well as hundreds of detailed entries on issues, events, people, and ideas.

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