Catalogue

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American confluence : the Missouri frontier from borderland to border state /
Stephen Aron.
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2006.
description
xxi, 301 p.
ISBN
0253346916 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2006.
isbn
0253346916 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5739353
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-02-01:
This sophisticated analysis of a broad region within the US Midwest focuses upon the sprawling lands that marked the intersection of the country's three primary rivers--the Mississippi, Ohio, and Missouri--as well as the diverse peoples who inhabited those lands between 1600 and 1860. Aron (UCLA) contends that the region marked a cultural confluence of French, Spanish, British, and US institutions, as well as a confluence of indigenous and eastern removed Native American tribes. Following a discussion of French explorations, the author analyzes the trade networks established between French Canadian residents of the Cahokia area with powerful people such as the Osages. The mutual exchange of goods, lifeways, and even marriage partners tied the societies together. When Spain asserted imperial control over the west bank of the Mississippi following the French exit in 1763, the transition proved almost seamless. On the east bank, however, British hegemony demanded greater changes in trade patterns. When the US established its sovereignty over British possessions in the 1783 Treaty of Paris and expanded those powers in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, Native American positions began to decline. The change was so thorough that by the 1840s-50s, the issues of slavery and Mormonism had replaced the older imperial concerns. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Libraries serving all adult readers. M. L. Tate University of Nebraska at Omaha
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fascinating and useful contribution to both Atlantic world and North American West scholarship -- a claim certainly few other monographs could make." -- H-Atlantic
"A real pleasure to read, the book adds considerably to the anthropological discussion about the degree to which invading people are successful in transplanting their culture and the degree to which they are transformed by the new environment and peoples they are invading." -- Missouri Historical Review
"This is western history at its best." -- Western Historical Quarterly
"This sophisticated analysis... focuses upon the sprawling lands that marked the intersection of the country's three primary rivers -- the Mississippi, Ohio, and Missouri -- as well as the diverse peoples who inhabited those lands between 1600 and 1860.... Recommended." -- Choice
"... a fascinating and useful contribution to both Atlantic world and North American West scholarship -- a claim certainly few other monographs could make." -- Atlantic
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the heart of North America, the Missouri, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers come together, uniting waters from west, north, and east on a journey to the south. This is the region that Stephen Aron calls the American Confluence. This book examines the history of that region.
Long Description
A bold new history of Missouri--the region where the American West begins.
Main Description
In the heart of North America, the Missouri, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers come together, uniting waters from west, north, and east on a journey to the south. This is the region that Stephen Aron calls the American Confluence. Aron's innovative book examines the history of that region -- a home to the Osage, a colony exploited by the French, a new frontier explored by Lewis and Clark -- and focuses on the region's transition from a place of overlapping borderlands to one of oppositional border states. American Confluence is a lively account that will delight both the amateur and professional historian.
Main Description
In the heart of North America, the Missouri, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers come together, uniting waters from west, north, and east on a journey to the south. This is the region that Stephen Aron calls the "American Confluence." His innovative book examines the history of that region-a home to the Osage, a colony exploited by the French, a new frontier explored by Lewis and Clark. Aron focuses on the region's transition from a place of overlapping borderlands to one of oppositional Border States. American Confluence is a lively account that should delight amateur and professional historians alike.Stephen Aron, professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, and executive director of the Institute for the Study of the American West at the Autry National Center, is a specialist in frontier and western American history. He is author of How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay (1996) and coauthor of Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: A History of the Modern World from the Mongol Empire to the Present (2002). He is currently conducting research on the intercultural experiences of Daniel Boone and his descendants and on the history of the horse in the American West.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Openingsp. 1
Traditionsp. 39
Newcomersp. 69
Transfersp. 106
Quakesp. 149
Closingsp. 186
Epiloguep. 220
Notesp. 245
Indexp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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