Catalogue


Fearful symmetry : India-Pakistan crises in the shadow of nuclear weapons /
Sumit Ganguly and Devin T. Hagerty.
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, 2005.
description
x, 223 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0295985259 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, 2005.
isbn
0295985259 (hardback)
contents note
Wars without end? -- 1984: India, Pakistan, and preventive war fears -- Threat perceptions, military modernization and a crisis -- The 1990 Kashmir crisis -- Out of the closet: the 1998 nuclear tesets crisis -- The road to Kargil -- The 2001-2 Indo-Pakistani crisis: exposing the limits of coercive diplomacy -- Lessons, implications, and policy suggestions.
catalogue key
5729192
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-01-01:
Building on prior research, Ganguly (Indiana Univ.) and Hagerty (Univ. of Maryland) present the first comprehensive analysis of the six Indo-Pakistani crises in the shadow of nuclear weapons. They argue that, despite profound mistrust and the intractable Kashmir dispute, both countries have refrained from all-out conventional war since 1984 for fear that it might escalate to the nuclear level. After analyzing the three major conventional Indo-Pakistani wars--1947-48, 1965, and 1971--the bulk of the book examines excellent, detailed case studies of the India-Pakistan crises of 1984, 1986-87, 1990, 1998, 1999, and 2001-02. The authors argue that nuclear deterrence provides the best explanation for the absence of major wars and that the Clinton administration's strong pressure played an important role in preventing the 1999 Kargil war from developing into a major Indo-Pakistani conflict. They recognize the real danger of accidental nuclear war and recommend that the US abandon its crisis-management orientation and use its diplomatic resources to achieve a permanent solution to the Kashmir dispute. This well-researched volume would have benefited from a discussion of optimistic and pessimistic scholarly arguments about the stability of nuclear deterrence in South Asia. Readers should also consult Scott Sagan and Kenneth Waltz's The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate Renewed (CH, Nov.'95, 33-1793). ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate and above. M. E. Carranza Texas A&M University--Kingsville
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book provides a timely review of how India and Pakistan have several times nearly allowed their grievances to lead to war -- and how, each time, they managed to dodge disaster." Steve Coll, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of 3Ghost Wars"An outstanding book which shows that nuclear weapons are a force for peace, but with major qualifications." John J. Mearsheimer, University of Chicago"Explains a great deal about . . . important events, many of them not well known, and about international rivalry in general. This is an important and informative study." Robert Jervis, Columbia University"This book asks an important question: Why have India and Pakistan not fought a major war in the past two decade? It gives a crisp answer: nuclear weapons. Along the way, the authors with a sure touch explore the byways of Pakistani and Indian political and military policies." Kenneth Waltz, author of 3A Theory of International Politics"Represents a superb effort to understand the impact of nuclear weapons on South Asian stability. By using available public information about regional crises in a theoretically sensitive way, this book makes a major contribution to the deterrence literature." Ashley J. Tellis, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2006
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
With the nuclearization of the Indian sub-continent, Indo-Pakistani crisis behavior has acquired a deadly significance. The past two decades have witnessed no fewer than six crises against the backdrop of a vigorous nuclear arms race. Except for the Kargil war of 1998-9, all these events were resolved peacefully. Nuclear war was avoided despite bitter mistrust, everyday tensions, an intractable political conflict over Kashmir, three wars, and the steady refinement of each side's nuclear capabilities. Sumit Ganguly and Devin T. Hagerty carefully analyze each crisis, reviewing the Indian and Pakistani domestic political systems and key decisions during the relevant period. This lucid and comprehensive study of the two nations' crisis behavior in the nuclear age is the first work on Indo-Pakistani relations to take systematic account of the role played by the United States in South Asia's security dynamics over the past two decades in the context of unipolarization, and formulates a blueprint for American policy toward a more positive and productive India-Pakistan relationship.
Bowker Data Service Summary
With the nuclearisation of the Indian sub-continent, Indo-Pakistani crises have acquired a deadly significance. The authors examine six crises of the past two decades and the role that nuclear weapons and the security dynamics of the United States in the region have played in averting a major conflict.
Main Description
With the nuclearization of the Indian subcontinent, Indo-Pakistani crisis behaviour has acquired a deadly significance. The past two decades have witnessed no fewer than six crises against the backdrop of a vigorous nuclear arms race. Except for the Kargil war of 1998-9, all these events were resolved peacefully.Nuclear war was avoided despite bitter mistrust, everyday tensions, an intractable political conflict over Kashmir, three wars, and the steady refinement of each side's nuclear capabilities. Sumit Ganguly and Devin T. Hagerty carefully analyze each crisis, reviewing the Indian and Pakistani domestic political systems and key decisions during the relevant period.This lucid and comprehensive study of the two nations' crisis behaviour in the nuclear age is the first work on Indo-Pakistani relations to take systematic account of the role played by the United States in South Asia's security dynamics over the past two decades in the context of uni-polarization, and formulates a blueprint for American policy toward a more positive and productive India-Pakistan relationship.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Wars without end?p. 21
1984 : India, Pakistan, and preventative war fearsp. 44
Threat perceptions, military modernization, and a crisisp. 68
The 1990 Kashmir crisisp. 82
Out of the closet : the 1998 nuclear tests crisisp. 116
The road to Kargilp. 143
The 2001-2 Indo-Pakistani crisis : exposing the limits of coercive diplomacyp. 167
Lessons, implications, and policy suggestionsp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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