Catalogue


Alien visions : the Chechens and the Navajos in Russian and American literature /
Margaret Ziolkowski.
imprint
Newark : University of Delaware Press, c2005.
description
239 p.
ISBN
0874139260 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Newark : University of Delaware Press, c2005.
isbn
0874139260 (alk. paper)
contents note
Russian orientalism : inventing the evil Chechen -- Sympathy for the devil : Anatolii Pristavkin and the Chechen deportation -- Popular and unpopular enemies : the Russo-Chechen conflict in contemporary Russian literature -- Reservation blues : education and alienation among the Navajos -- Remembering Bosque Redondo : the Navajo deportation in twentieth-century literature -- Solving crimes in Navajoland : the medicine man and his alter egos.
catalogue key
5684770
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-04-01:
Ziolkowski (Miami Univ., Ohio) draws broad parallels--and suggests subtle differences--between the way that the indigenous peoples of North America have been represented in literary works by white Americans and the way that indigenous peoples of the Caucasus have been represented by the dominant Russian culture. In each case, her analysis "requires attentiveness to all the conscious and unconscious strategies of stereotyping," as both the Chechen in Russian literature and the Navajo in American literature "are often constructs, images derived from a potent combination of prejudices and received assumptions." The comparative emphasis is the book's greatest strength, providing insightful and layered readings of a range of literary texts. Ziolkowski's ability to synthesize complex historical matter from centuries of Russian and American history with illuminating examples from literature is impressive and deepens understanding of the ideologies of cultural domination and ethnic idealization. However, as is often the case with postcolonial analyses, more could have been done to examine the role of indigenous peoples in shaping, maneuvering, and exploiting the master narratives that seek to frame and control them. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. D. Pesta Oklahoma State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2006
Choice, April 2006
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
There are many parallels and some revealing differences in the encounter between, on the one hand, the Americans and various Indian tribes and, on the other, the Russians and some of the peoples of the Caucasus and Siberia. The enduring cultural consequences of these encounters provide a fruitful area of inquiry for the comparative examination of national images in literatures. The major focus on this study is the perceptions and literary portrayal of the Chechens by the Russians and the Navajos by the Americans. Both the Chechen in Russian literature and the Navajo in American literature are often constructs, images derived from a potent combination of prejudices and received assumptions. In each case a relatively sizable corpus of writings produced over a century or longer exemplifies or attempts to counter persistent and influential modes of cultural stereotyping. The diachronic analysis of the portrayal of either the Chechens or the Navajos illuminates patterns of prejudice that have immense implications for both popular and high culture. The juxtaposition of the discussion of the two groups as they have been treated in Russian and American literature can deepen our understanding of the commonalities present in attempted cultural domination or ethnic idealization. Margaret Ziolkowski is Professor of Russian at Miami University, Ohio.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 13
Russian orientalism : inventing the evil Chechenp. 30
Sympathy for the devil : Anatolii Pristavkin and the Chechen deportationp. 64
Popular and unpopular enemies : the Russo-Chechen conflict in contemporary Russian literaturep. 84
Reservation blues : education and alienation among the Navajosp. 113
Remembering Bosque Redondo : the Navajo deportation in twentieth-century literaturep. 143
Solving crimes in Navajoland : the medicine man and his alter egosp. 180
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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