Catalogue


Global economics : a history of the theater business, the Chamberlain's/King's Men, and their plays, 1599-1642 /
Melissa D. Aaron.
imprint
Newark : University of Delaware Press, c2005.
description
250 p.
ISBN
0874138779 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Newark : University of Delaware Press, c2005.
isbn
0874138779 (alk. paper)
contents note
Global economics : the Chamberlain's Men, 1599-1603 -- The court and the stage : the King's Men at Blackfriars and Whitehall, 1610-13 -- The King's Men, second generation : the company without Shakespeare, 1623-26 -- Golden handcuffs : the King's Men and economic failure, 1632-42.
general note
Originally presented as author's thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin.
catalogue key
5656372
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of the Chamberlain's/King's Men as a business. The text investigates the economic workings of the company: the conditions under which they operated, their expenses and income, and the ways in which they adapted to fit changing circumstances.
Unpaid Annotation
This book is a study of the Chamberlain's/King's Men as a business. It investigates the economic workings of the company: the conditions under which they operated, their expenses and income, and the ways in which they adopted to fit changing circumstances. Each chapter focuses on a different moment in the company's history, and consists of "economic readings," exploring texts by Shakespeare and other authors through an economic lens, as the property of the company and through the circumstances in which they were written. Henry V is read against the building of the Globe Theatre; Hamlet as a summation of the company's economic status. Items such as bear costumes and masque techniques are traced, showing how the company was able to exploit both public and private markets. As the company became more conservative, its expenses higher, its productions more lavish, and its repertory and audience smaller, it also became more financially vulnerable. Shakespeare's company, in essence, went out of business. Melissa D. Aaron is an Associate Professor of English in the Department of English and Foreign Languages at California State University-Pomona.
Table of Contents
Global economics : the Chamberlain's Men, 1599-1603p. 23
The court and the stage : the King's Men at Blackfriars and Whitehall, 1610-13p. 82
The King's Men, second generation : the company without Shakespeare, 1623-26p. 119
Golden handcuffs : the King's Men and economic failure, 1632-42p. 159
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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