Catalogue


Paulus und seine "Kinder" : Studien zur Beziehungsmetaphorik der paulinischen Briefe /
Christine Gerber.
imprint
Berlin ; New York : W. de Gruyter, c2005.
description
xvii, 576 p.
ISBN
3110184788 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berlin ; New York : W. de Gruyter, c2005.
isbn
3110184788 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5655680
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 538-576) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Through its detailed and sensitve analysis, the study marks a valuable contribution to examinations of the language of family relationships in early Christian literature."Cornelia B. Horn in: Catholic Biblical Quarterly 68/2006
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
With his Epistles, the Apostle Paul not only gave theological instruction but also cultivated individual relationships with the communities he was addressing. This study examines how the Epistles set up and secure Paul's continuing importance for the churches if it has not already been established through his Apostolate. This is achieved above all by means of metaphors. The study focuses on the parent-child metaphors (1 Thess. 2; 1 Cor. 4; Gal. 4) with which Paul seeks to bind his "children" to himself in a special way.
Main Description
With his Epistles, the Apostle Paul not only gave theological instruction but also cultivated individual relationships with the communities he was addressing. This study examines how the Epistles set up and secure Paul's continuing importance for the churches if it has not already been established through his Apostolate. This is achieved above all by means of metaphors. The study focuses on the parent-child metaphors (1 Thess. 2; 1 Cor. 4; Gal. 4) with which Paul seeks to bind his children to himself in a special way.
Main Description
With his Epistles, the Apostle Paul not only gave theological instruction but also cultivated individual relationships with the communities he was addressing. This study examines how the Epistles set up and secure Paul's continuing importance for the churches if it has not already been established through his Apostolate. This is achieved above all by means of metaphors. The study focuses on the parent-child metaphors (1 Thess. 2; 1 Cor. 4; Gal. 4) with which Paul seeks to bind his 'oechildren' to himself in a special way.
Main Description
With his Epistles, the Apostle Paul not only gave theological instruction but also cultivated individual relationships with the communities he was addressing. This study examines how the Epistles set up and secure Paul's continuing importance for the churches if it has not already been established through his Apostolate. This is achieved above all by means of metaphors. The study focuses on the parent-child metaphors (1 Thess. 2; 1 Cor. 4; Gal. 4) with which Paul seeks to bind his 'œchildren' to himself in a special way.

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