Catalogue


The independent man : citizenship and gender politics in Georgian England /
Matthew McCormack.
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2005
description
ix, 222 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
ISBN
0719070546 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2005
isbn
0719070546 (hbk.)
standard identifier
9780719070549
catalogue key
5650939
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-217) and index
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Matthew McCormack is Lecturer in History at the University of Northampton.
Summaries
Main Description
In Georgian England, independence was associated with manly virtue and physical vigour. Fundamentally, the political world was thought to consist of "independent men" exercising their consciences and standing up for the general good. As such, Georgians thought about political action and masculine virtue very differently to the ways in which we do today.
Main Description
'Independence' was an important ideal for men in Georgian England. In this period however, the word meant much more than simply the virtues of self-sufficiency and impartiality. Most people believed that obligations absolutely compromised freedom and conscience, whereas 'independence' was associated with manly virtue and physical vigour. Fundamentally, the political world was thought to consist of 'independent men', exercising their consciences and standing up for the general good. As such, Georgians thought about political action and masculine virtue very differently to the ways in which we do today.In this important new study, Matthew McCormack establishes the links between the histories of masculinity and politics, highlighting the centrality of 'manly' ideals in the political world and - conversely - the role of politics in the operation of gender ideology. The book will be welcomed by students and specialists alike with interests in politics, gender studies or British history in the period
Bowker Data Service Summary
Making a link between the histories of masculinity and politics, McCormack argues that politics has a fundamental impact on gender, as well as vice versa. Re-reading familiar political sources in the light of new developments in gender studies and cultural theory, he offers a critique of key areas in the field.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Gender, obligation and political virtuep. 12
'Act the part of Honest Independent Men'p. 31
From the Civil War to the Seven Years Warp. 56
Declarations of Independence, 1760-76p. 80
Rethinking the independent Englishman, 1770-97p. 104
Anti-Jacobinism and citizenship, 1789-1815p. 140
Independence versus Old Corruption, 1815-29p. 162
Independence and the reform debates, 1830-32p. 187
Conclusionp. 201
Select Bibliographyp. 212
Indexp. 218
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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