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Racial encounter : the social psychology of contact and desegregation /
Kevin Durrheim and John Dixon.
imprint
Hove, East Sussex ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
description
vi, 256 p. : ill.
ISBN
0415305322 (hard cover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Hove, East Sussex ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
isbn
0415305322 (hard cover)
catalogue key
5624562
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kevin Durrheim is Professor of Psychology at the University of KwaZulu-Natal John Dixon is Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology at the University of Lancaster
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is an excellent book. It is a joy to read on a number of levels. It is clear, thoughtful and weaves its way through the different literatures of racism and segregation in a subtle but surefooted manner. The breadth of the authors' scholarship shows through, as does the value of their use of a case study to focus everything around. ." -Jonathan Potter, Professor of Discourse Analysis in the Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University
'This is an excellent book. It is a joy to read on a number of levels. It is clear, thoughtful and weaves its way through the different literatures of racism and segregation in a subtle but surefooted manner. The breadth of the authors' scholarship shows through, as does the value of their use of a case study to focus everything around.'- Jonathan Potter, Professor of Discourse Analysis in the Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The political and legislative changes which took place in South Africa during the 1990s, with the dissolution of apartheid, created a unique set of social conditions. As official policies of segregation were abolished, people of both black and white racial groups began to experience new forms of social contact and intimacy. By examining these emerging processes of intergroup contact in South Africa, and evaluating related evidence from the US, Racial Encounter offers a social psychological account of desegregation. It begins with a critical analysis of the traditional theories and research models used to understand desegregation: the contact hypothesis and race attitude theory. It then analyzes every day discourse about desegregation in South Africa, showing how discourse shapes individuals' conception and management of their changing relationships and acts as a site of ideological resistance to social change. The connection between place, identity and re-creation of racial boundaries emerge as a central theme of this analysis. This book will be of interest to social psychologists, students of intergroup relations and all those interested in post-apartheid South Africa.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The political and legislative changes which took place in South Africa during the 1990s created a unique set of social conditions. This book examines the effects of desegregation, looking in particular at the social and psychological changes brought about by the racial transformation.
Long Description
The political and legislative changes which took place in South Africa during the 1990s, with the dissolution of apartheid, created a unique set of social conditions. As official policies of segregation were abolished, people of both black and white racial groups began to experience new forms of social contact and intimacy for the first time. br br By examining the processes of intergroup contact which arose in South Africa following the removal of official ethnic divides, and supporting it with evidence from the US, Racial Encounter offers a social psychological account of desegregation. It begins with a critical analysis of the traditional theories and research models used to understand desegregation: the contact hypothesis and race attitude theory. It then proceeds by considering and analysing every day discourse, as central to an individual's conception and management of relationships and as a key site of ideological resistance to social change. br br This book will be of interest to social psychologists, students of intergroup relations and all those interested in post-apartheid South Africa
Main Description
The political and legislative changes which took place in South Africa during the 1990s, with the dissolution of apartheid, created a unique set of social conditions. As official policies of segregation were abolished, people of both black and white racial groups began to experience new forms of social contact and intimacy for the first time. By examining the processes of intergroup contact which arose in South Africa following the removal of official ethnic divides, and supporting it with evidence from the US, Racial Encounter offers a social psychological account of desegregation. It begins with a critical analysis of the traditional theories and research models used to understand desegregation: the contact hypothesis and race attitude theory. It then proceeds by considering and analysing every day discourse, as central to an individual's conception and management of relationships and as a key site of ideological resistance to social change. This book will be of interest to socialpsychologists, students of intergroup relations and all those interested in post-apartheid South Africa
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. vii
List of tablesp. ix
Prefacep. x
Introductionp. 1
The contact hypothesis reconsideredp. 17
The contact hypothesis as a framework for understanding the social psychology of desegregationp. 19
Contact and the 'ecology' of everyday relationsp. 39
'You have to be scared when they're in masses': working models of contact in ordinary accounts of 'racial' interaction and avoidancep. 62
Attitudes to desegregation reconsideredp. 83
Attitudes towards desegregation as a framework for understanding the social psychology of desegregationp. 85
Evaluative practices: a discursive approach to investigating desegregation attitudesp. 110
Lay ontologizing: everyday explanations of segregation and opposition to desegregationp. 133
Group differences in narrating the 'lived experience' of desegregationp. 155
'Locating' the social psychology of contact and desegregationp. 177
Dislocating identity: desegregation and the transformation of placep. 179
Conclusion: 'racial preferences' and the tenacity of segregationp. 208
Methods used in the interviews and observational studiesp. 220
Endnotesp. 227
Referencesp. 232
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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