Catalogue

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Markets and marketing in Roman Palestine /
by Ben-Zion Rosenfeld and Joseph Menirav ; translated from the Hebrew by Chava Cassel.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2005.
description
xii, 281 p.
ISBN
9004140492 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2005.
isbn
9004140492 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5624380
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Reference & Research Book News, February 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book presents a variety of topics relating to the market in Roman Palestine, dealing with the main elements of commercial life and portraying the process by which the flow in the market occurred.
Description for Reader
The book is intended for scholars, academics, and students interested in commerce and daily life in ancient times, and in Roman Palestine in particular. It will also appeal to any educated individual with an interest in Roman Palestine and the development of marketing systems in the ancient world.
Long Description
The book presents a variety of topics relating to the market in Roman Palestine. The book deals with the main elements of commercial life the different types of markets and the entities and figures that played a part in it. It portrays the process by which the flow of goods in the market occurs from the end of the production process, via the entire range of middlemen, to the end user.A chapter is devoted to the pricing of merchandise in the economy of Roman Palestine. It offers a comprehensive framework which includes the techniques by which prices were determined and enforced. Other chapters deal with the image of the different market vendors, as viewed by the public and by the Jewish sages, and the commercial activity that took place in and around the synagogues.The book is based on a combination of rabbinic, literary and archaeological sources as well as epigraphic findings. It depicts the economy of Roman Palestine against the backdrop of the Roman Empire.
Unpaid Annotation
The book presents a variety of topics relating to the market in Roman Palestine. The book deals with the main elements of commercial life - the different types of markets and the entities and figures that played a part in it. It portrays the process by which the flow of goods in the market occurs - from the end of the production process, via the entire range of middlemen, to the end user. A chapter is devoted to the pricing of merchandise in the economy of Roman Palestine. It offers a comprehensive framework which includes the techniques by which prices were determined and enforced. Other chapters deal with the image of the different market vendors, as viewed by the public and by the Jewish sages, and the commercial activity that took place in and around the synagogues. The book is based on a combination of rabbinic, literary and archaeological sources as well as epigraphic findings. It depicts the economy of Roman Palestine against the backdrop of the Roman Empire.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Different Types of Marketsp. 1
State of the Researchp. 3
Methodology and Chronologyp. 5
The Chapters of the Bookp. 7
The Market and Societyp. 9
Sources and Translationsp. 13
Permanent Marketsp. 15
Introductionp. 15
Permanent Markets in the Roman Empirep. 15
Permanent Markets in Palestinep. 17
The Makolinp. 26
The Emporiump. 29
Summaryp. 30
Periodic Marketsp. 33
Introductionp. 33
Periodic Markets in the Roman Empirep. 33
Periodic Markets in Palestinep. 38
Definitions and Characteristicsp. 38
The Small Town Marketp. 41
Periodic Markets in the Large Towns and Citiesp. 43
The Sidkip. 45
Fairs in the Roman Empirep. 50
Fairs in Palestinep. 58
Main Characteristicsp. 58
The Attitude of the Sages to the Fairp. 60
Summaryp. 68
Market Vendorsp. 71
Introductionp. 71
The Local Marketing Spherep. 74
The Shop-Shopkeeperp. 74
The Siton (Wholesaler)p. 88
The Nahtom (Baker)p. 94
The Palterp. 100
The Manpolp. 110
Summaryp. 116
The Regional and Inter-Regional Marketing Spheresp. 116
Introductionp. 116
The Peddlerp. 117
The Local Town Tagarp. 124
Traveling Merchantsp. 127
Jewish and Non-Jewish Tagarimp. 133
Pricing and Price Regulationp. 137
Introductionp. 137
Pricing in the Roman Periodp. 139
Fixing the Wholesale Price ([characters not reproducible] = The Sha'ar)p. 142
The Sha'ar and Retail Pricesp. 153
The Geographical Extent of the Use of the Sha'arp. 158
Enforcement and Supervisionp. 160
The Effect on Prices Caused by the Regulating of Supply and Demandp. 163
Summaryp. 168
Commerce and Marketers, as Viewed by the Sagesp. 171
Introductionp. 171
The Attitude of the Sages to Commerce as an Occupationp. 172
The Marketplace as Viewed by the Tannaimp. 177
The Negative Attitude Towards Market Vendors as a Consequence of their Behaviorp. 180
The Negative Attitude Towards Market Vendors Resulting from their Dealings with Womenp. 190
Honest and Dishonest Vendorsp. 199
Summaryp. 208
Addendum. Commercial Activity and the Synagoguep. 211
Introductionp. 211
Commercial Activity in the Synagogue Buildingp. 211
Commercial Activity on the Synagogue Premises and the Adjacent Areap. 223
Hostels (Akhsaniot)p. 223
Storesp. 226
The Effect of the Synagogue on Commercial Activity in the Town and the Marketp. 230
Conclusionsp. 233
Bibliographyp. 235
Index of Ancient Sourcesp. 261
General Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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