Catalogue


The war that made America : a short history of the French and Indian War /
Fred Anderson ; illustrations chosen and captioned by R. Scott Stephenson.
imprint
New York : Viking, 2005.
description
xxv, 293 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), port. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0670034541
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Viking, 2005.
isbn
0670034541
catalogue key
5623603
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Spur Awards, USA, 2006 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2005-10-10:
The author of the award-winning, scholarly account of the French and Indian War Crucible of War (2000) offers a scaled-down, popular version of that history in this companion volume to the January 2006 PBS documentary. It is an excellent introduction to a conflict that most Americans know little about, and that Winston Churchill called the first worldwide war. Anderson focuses on the North American theater, the outcome of which he claims "transformed the colonists' world forever" and, in effect, "made America." He shows how the conflict encouraged colonials "to conceive of themselves as equal partners in the [British] empire," a concept that Britain did not share and that led inexorably to postwar strife and revolution. In a departure from earlier accounts, Anderson gives unprecedented coverage to the role of Native Americans in the struggle and demonstrates how the war paved the way for the American government's eventual "destruction or subjugation of native societies." Like the best popular historians, Anderson combines exhaustive research and an accessible prose style in a volume that should help rescue the French and Indian War from historical obscurity. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2006-05-01:
Paralleling his majestic Crucible of War (CH, Jul'00, 37-6428), Anderson (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder) again visits the French and Indian War with this abbreviated study, intended as an accompaniment to a TV documentary. Although one might fault this book's brevity, gaps, and insufficient human dimension (excepting ample depiction of rivalries of high command and the dilemmas of Native Americans), it complements the more comprehensive earlier volume, particularly with interpretations of motives, strategy, and leadership. Anderson exhibits considerable literary skill, but his effort to cast events in the shadow of George Washington by means of introductory and concluding chapters falls flat. Discussion of military campaigns emerges only as fragments. There are nearly 100 illustrations, but no annotations. Surprisingly, the book is of more service as a postevaluation of the war rather than as an introduction to it. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. More for scholars than general readers, but appropriate for all levels and libraries. H. M. Ward emeritus, University of Richmond
Appeared in Library Journal on 2005-11-01:
Anderson (history, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder), winner of the Francis Parkman Prize for Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766, here provides an excellent shorter history of that conflict, which has been called "the first world war." His new book will serve as a companion to the forthcoming PBS documentary of the same name, set to debut in January 2006. Intended for a more general audience than Crucible of War, the present volume lacks notes but contains a lengthy bibliographic essay. Anderson's analyses can be both insightful and critical but are always balanced and fair. He emphasizes the roles played by all three warring parties-the French, the British, and the Iroquois Confederacy-rather than simply the two European powers. Overall, this work is an excellent introduction to a complex, dynamic conflict that set the stage for the American Revolution. Recommended for all libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 8/05.]-Matthew J. Wayman, Pennsylvania State Univ., Abington Coll. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, August 2005
Publishers Weekly, October 2005
Booklist, November 2005
Library Journal, November 2005
Wall Street Journal, December 2005
New York Times Book Review, January 2006
Choice, May 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The companion volume to a major PBS documentary series is a vivid look at arguably the most pivotal war in early American history. Beautifully illustrated, this is the story of how America emerged from a series of fractured colonies and warring tribes into a nation ripe for independence.
Main Description
Apart from The Last of the Mohicans, most Americans know little of the French and Indian War—also known as the Seven Years’ War—and yet it remains one of the most fascinating periods in our history. In January 2006, PBS will air The War That Made America, a four-part documentary about this epic conflict. Fred Anderson, the award-winning and critically acclaimed historian, has written the official tie-in to this exciting television event.In The War That Made America, Anderson deftly shows how the expansion of the British colonies into French territory in the 1750s and the ongoing Native American struggle for survival would erupt into seven years of bloodshed and unrest spreading from the backwoods of Pennsylvania to the high courts of Europe, eventually overturning the balance of power on two continents and laying the groundwork for the American Revolution. Beautifully illustrated, richly detailed, and utterly compelling, this is the story of how America as we know it today emerged from a series of fractured colonies and warring tribes into a nation ripe for independence—and nobody tells this story better than Fred Anderson.
Main Description
Apart from The Last of the Mohicans, most Americans know little of the French and Indian War—also known as the Seven Years’ War—and yet it remains one of the most fascinating periods in our history. In January 2006, PBS will air The War That Made America, a four-part documentary about this epic conflict. Fred Anderson, the award-winning and critically acclaimed historian, has written the official tie-in to this exciting television event. In The War That Made America, Anderson deftly shows how the expansion of the British colonies into French territory in the 1750s and the ongoing Native American struggle for survival would erupt into seven years of bloodshed and unrest spreading from the backwoods of Pennsylvania to the high courts of Europe, eventually overturning the balance of power on two continents and laying the groundwork for the American Revolution. Beautifully illustrated, richly detailed, and utterly compelling, this is the story of how America as we know it today emerged from a series of fractured colonies and warring tribes into a nation ripe for independence—and nobody tells this story better than Fred Anderson.
Main Description
Apart from The Last of the Mohicans, most Americans know little of the French and Indian War'also known as the Seven Years? War'and yet it remains one of the most fascinating periods in our history. In January 2006, PBS will air The War That Made America, a four-part documentary about this epic conflict. Fred Anderson, the award-winning and critically acclaimed historian, has written the official tie-in to this exciting television event. In The War That Made America, Anderson deftly shows how the expansion of the British colonies into French territory in the 1750s and the ongoing Native American struggle for survival would erupt into seven years of bloodshed and unrest spreading from the backwoods of Pennsylvania to the high courts of Europe, eventually overturning the balance of power on two continents and laying the groundwork for the American Revolution. Beautifully illustrated, richly detailed, and utterly compelling, this is the story of how America as we know it today emerged from a series of fractured colonies and warring tribes into a nation ripe for independence'and nobody tells this story better than Fred Anderson.
Table of Contents
Prologue : New York, July 1776
A delicate balancep. 3
The half king's dilemmap. 17
Confrontation on the Ohiop. 25
"Thou art not yet dead, my father"p. 37
Interventionp. 55
Braddock's marchp. 64
A lake defended, a province purgedp. 74
La Guerre Sauvagep. 88
The European war beginsp. 100
The making of a "massacre"p. 106
The ascent of William Pittp. 119
The Red Cross of Carillonp. 133
Louisbourgp. 141
Colonel Bradstreet's coupp. 146
Makers of war, makers of peacep. 152
General Forbes's last campaignp. 163
Reckoningsp. 173
A shift in the balancep. 179
Incident at La Belle Famillep. 184
General Amherst hesitatesp. 189
The plains of Abrahamp. 193
"A mighty empire"p. 207
The Spanish gambitp. 218
Peacep. 228
Insurrectionp. 231
Crisis and resolutionp. 242
A patriot's progressp. 251
Epilogue : legaciesp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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