Catalogue


Collecting the new : museums and contemporary art /
edited by Bruce Altshuler.
imprint
Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, c2005.
description
195 p. : ill.
ISBN
0691119406 (CL : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, c2005.
isbn
0691119406 (CL : alk. paper)
local note
Inforum copy: Signed by the author.
catalogue key
5617209
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
By bringing together such a diverse range of informed voices, this book wonderfully succeeds in suggesting not merely as theory, but with the nitty-gritty feel of reality the very specific considerations that a museum's staff must take into account in determining whether or not to acquire, whether by gift or purchase, any particular work of art. I know of no other English-language publication that has previously addressed this issue with comparable depth or breadth.
Particularly well-organized and accessibly written, this book explores the collecting and preservation of contemporary art created in a wide range of media. Its variety of essays, especially those addressing different types of institutions and various spheres of ethnicity and region, provides a very rich, stimulating, and useful introduction to this important topic.
This book is a sensitively-edited collection of twelve essays (including a historical introduction by the editor), which addresses the complexity of the problems and issues that Western museums confront in dealing with contemporary art today. With its selection of diverse and intriguing case studies and specific focus on the contemporary art scene, it is an important and welcome addition to one of the primary fields of museum studies concerning the significance of collecting and collections for museums. -- Masaaki Morishita, Museum and Society
"This book is a sensitively-edited collection of twelve essays (including a historical introduction by the editor), which addresses the complexity of the problems and issues that Western museums confront in dealing with contemporary art today. With its selection of diverse and intriguing case studies and specific focus on the contemporary art scene, it is an important and welcome addition to one of the primary fields of museum studies concerning the significance of collecting and collections for museums."-- Masaaki Morishita, Museum and Society
This book is a sensitively-edited collection of twelve essays (including a historical introduction by the editor), which addresses the complexity of the problems and issues that Western museums confront in dealing with contemporary art today. With its selection of diverse and intriguing case studies and specific focus on the contemporary art scene, it is an important and welcome addition to one of the primary fields of museum studies concerning the significance of collecting and collections for museums.
In this volume of thoughtful essays, curators, conservators, scholars, and others in the museum world address how institutions should collect, exhibit, and care for the new art. . . [T]he essays by seasoned professionals bring a new dimensions to the museum-going experience.
"In this volume of thoughtful essays, curators, conservators, scholars, and others in the museum world address how institutions should collect, exhibit, and care for the new art. . . [T]he essays by seasoned professionals bring a new dimensions to the museum-going experience."-- Ann Landi, ArtNews
In this volume of thoughtful essays, curators, conservators, scholars, and others in the museum world address how institutions should collect, exhibit, and care for the new art. . . [T]he essays by seasoned professionals bring a new dimensions to the museum-going experience. -- Ann Landi, ArtNews
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Collecting the New is the first book on the questions and challenges that museums face in acquiring and preserving contemporary art. Because such art has not yet withstood the test of time, it defies the traditional understanding of the art museum as an institution that collects and displays works of long-established aesthetic and historical value. By acquiring such art, museums gamble on the future. In addition, new technologies and alternative conceptions of the artwork have created special problems of conservation, while social, political, and aesthetic changes have generated new categories of works to be collected. Following Bruce Altshuler's introduction on the European and American history of museum collecting of art by living artists, the book comprises newly commissioned essays by twelve distinguished curators representing a wide range of museums. First considered are general issues including the acquisition process, and collecting by universal survey museums and museums that focus on modern and contemporary art. Following are groups of essays that address collecting in particular media, including prints and drawings, new (digital) media, and film and video; and national- and ethnic-specific collecting (contemporary art from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and African-American art). The closing essay examines the conservation problems created by contemporary works--for example, what is to be done when deterioration is the artist's intent? The contributors are Christophe Cherix, Vishakha N. Desai, Steve Dietz, Howard N. Fox, Chrissie Iles and Henriette Huldisch, Pamela McClusky, Gabriel P rez-Barreiro, Lowery Stokes Sims, Robert Storr, Jeffrey Weiss, and Glenn Wharton.
Main Description
Collecting the Newis the first book on the questions and challenges that museums face in acquiring and preserving contemporary art. Because such art has not yet withstood the test of time, it defies the traditional understanding of the art museum as an institution that collects and displays works of long-established aesthetic and historical value. By acquiring such art, museums gamble on the future. In addition, new technologies and alternative conceptions of the artwork have created special problems of conservation, while social, political, and aesthetic changes have generated new categories of works to be collected. Following Bruce Altshuler's introduction on the European and American history of museum collecting of art by living artists, the book comprises newly commissioned essays by twelve distinguished curators representing a wide range of museums. First considered are general issues including the acquisition process, and collecting by universal survey museums and museums that focus on modern and contemporary art. Following are groups of essays that address collecting in particular media, including prints and drawings, new (digital) media, and film and video; and national- and ethnic-specific collecting (contemporary art from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and African-American art). The closing essay examines the conservation problems created by contemporary works--for example, what is to be done when deterioration is the artist's intent? The contributors are Christophe Cherix, Vishakha N. Desai, Steve Dietz, Howard N. Fox, Chrissie Iles and Henriette Huldisch, Pamela McClusky, Gabriel PÉrez-Barreiro, Lowery Stokes Sims, Robert Storr, Jeffrey Weiss, and Glenn Wharton.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Twelve distinguished curators discuss the questions & challenges faced by museums in acquiring & preserving contemporary art.
Back Cover Copy
"By bringing together such a diverse range of informed voices, this book wonderfully succeeds in suggesting not merely as theory, but with the nitty-gritty feel of reality the very specific considerations that a museum's staff must take into account in determining whether or not to acquire, whether by gift or purchase, any particular work of art. I know of no other English-language publication that has previously addressed this issue with comparable depth or breadth."-- Stephen E. Weil, Scholar Emeritus, Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies, author of Making Museums Matter "Particularly well-organized and accessibly written, this book explores the collecting and preservation of contemporary art created in a wide range of media. Its variety of essays, especially those addressing different types of institutions and various spheres of ethnicity and region, provides a very rich, stimulating, and useful introduction to this important topic."-- Jeffrey Abt, Wayne State University
Back Cover Copy
"By bringing together such a diverse range of informed voices, this book wonderfully succeeds in suggesting not merely as theory, but with the nitty-gritty feel of reality the very specific considerations that a museum's staff must take into account in determining whether or not to acquire, whether by gift or purchase, any particular work of art. I know of no other English-language publication that has previously addressed this issue with comparable depth or breadth."--Stephen E. Weil, Scholar Emeritus, Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies, author of "Making Museums Matter""Particularly well-organized and accessibly written, this book explores the collecting and preservation of contemporary art created in a wide range of media. Its variety of essays, especially those addressing different types of institutions and various spheres of ethnicity and region, provides a very rich, stimulating, and useful introduction to this important topic."--Jeffrey Abt, Wayne State University
Table of Contents
Collecting the New: A Historical Introductionp. 1
The Right to Be Wrongp. 15
To Have and to Holdp. 29
9 Minutesp. 45
Secondsp. 41
Breaking Down Categories: Print Rooms, Drawing Departments, and the Museump. 55
Keeping Time: On Collecting Film and Video Art in the Museump. 65
Collecting New-Media Art: Just Like Anything Else, Only Differentp. 85
Beyond the "Authentic-Exotic": Collecting Contemporary Asian Art in the Twenty-first Centuryp. 103
The Unconscious Museum: Collecting Contemporary African Art without Knowing Itp. 115
The Accidental Tourist: American Collections of Latin American Artp. 131
Collecting the Art of African-Americans at the Studio Museum in Harlem: Positioning the "New" from the Perspective of the Pastp. 147
The Challenges of Conserving Contemporary Artp. 163
Acknowledgmentsp. 179
Indexp. 181
Photography Creditsp. 194
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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