Catalogue

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Season of rage : Hugh Burnett and the struggle for civil rights /
John Cooper.
imprint
Toronto : Tundra Books, c2005.
description
71 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0887767001 (pbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Tundra Books, c2005.
isbn
0887767001 (pbk.) :
abstract
"The last place in North America where black people and white people could not sit down together to share a cup of coffee in a restaurant was not in the Deep South. It was in the small, sleepy Ontario town of Dresden. Dresden is the site of Uncle Tomâ‚‚s Cabin. Slaves who made their way north through the Underground Railroad created the thriving Dawn Settlement in Dresden before and during the Civil War. They did not find Utopia on the Canadian side of the border, despite their efforts. In 1954 something extraordinary happened. The National Unity Association was a group of African Canadian citizens in Dresden who had challenged the racist attitudes of the 1950s and had forged an alliance with civil rights activists in Toronto to push the Ontario Government for changes to the law in order to outlaw discrimination. Despite the law, some business owners continued to refuse to serve blacks. The National Unity Association worked courageously through a variety of means of protest to change attitudes. The story of their season of rage is told in this compelling new book."--Publisher's website (www.tundrabooks.com)
catalogue key
5616850
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, February 2005
Quill & Quire, March 2005
Voice of Youth Advocates, June 2005
School Library Journal, July 2005
Voice of Youth Advocates, April 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The last place in North America where black people and white people could not sit down together to share a cup of coffee in a restaurant was not in the Deep South. It was in the small, sleepy Ontario town of Dresden. Dresden is the site of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Slaves who made their way north through the Underground Railroad created the thriving Dawn Settlement in Dresden before and during the Civil War. They did not find Utopia on the Canadian side of the border, despite their efforts. In 1954 something extraordinary happened. The National Unity Association was a group of African Canadian citizens in Dresden who had challenged the racist attitudes of the 1950s and had forged an alliance with civil rights activists in Toronto to push the Ontario Government for changes to the law in order to outlaw discrimination. Despite the law, some business owners continued to refuse to serve blacks. The National Unity Association worked courageously through a variety of means of protest to change attitudes. The story of their season of rage is told in this compelling new book.

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