Catalogue

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Democracy in Chile : the legacy of September 11, 1973 /
edited by Silvia Nagy-Zekmi and Fernando Leiva.
imprint
Brighton ; Portland : Sussex Academic Press, 2005.
description
xi, 226 p.
ISBN
1845190815 (h/c : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Brighton ; Portland : Sussex Academic Press, 2005.
isbn
1845190815 (h/c : alk. paper)
general note
"Most of the contributions collected here were presented ... at the October 10-12, 2003 international conference Democracy in Latin America: Thirty Years after Chile's 9/11 organized by the editors of the present volume at the University at Albany"--Introduction.
catalogue key
5614556
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-05-01:
This edited volume compiles reflections on varied legacies of the 1973 coup that ended the Allende government in Chile. Half of the contributors are literature scholars; the rest span the fields of history, law, political science, and sociology. Nagy-Zekmi (Villanova Univ.) and Leiva (SUNY, Albany) contribute an overall introduction as well as brief framing essays for the book's four distinct sections: Chilean relations with the US and the UK, neoliberal economic restructuring during and after the Pinochet regime, human rights issues, and cultural representations of Chilean dynamics before and after the coup. While there is no overarching theoretical framework, the contributors share a negative evaluation of the Pinochet regime's legacies for the subjects examined. The closing sections on human rights and cultural representations of Chile's evolution are the most compelling components of this brief book. An initial chapter outlines the political and legal dynamics of the human rights struggle while subsequent chapters explore how Chileans wrestle with these issues. This is highlighted by a discussion of reactions to the documentary film Fernando ha vuelto (1998) that includes transcripts of structured interviews with a cross-section of Chileans. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. H. Blake James Madison University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Almost all contributions are concise, well documented and well written, and together take stock of both the state of affairs of Chile's efforts to come to grips with its dictatorial history, and of the many pending economic, political and judicial injustices that yet need to be taken on ... a timely, well-documented collection that reminds us of the fact that to state that 'democracy has returned in Chile' is, to say the least, premature." European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies
"The interdisciplinary nature of the book enhances its ability to cover a range of topics and incorporate a variety of approaches, thus deepening the scope of questions asked (and answered) and subjects covered. The editors have done a very good job of bringing together an assorted set of chapters that they successfully weave together with helpful introductions... Although each chapter stands on its own, combined they offer a powerful answer to the question: What impact has the military coup that overthrew the Popular Unity government of Salvador Allende had on Chilean society, culture, and politics?" A Journal on Social History and Literature in Latin America
"This conference volume is unusual and valuable for its primary focus on Chile after the end of the dictatorship and the restoration of democracy in 1990. The authors in this anthology generally share the Left's critical gaze and offer a critique of Chile's much-lauded transition to democracy and neo-liberal economic miracle, lending the book an ideological cohesion." The Americas Review
"This volume gives an overall view of Chile today and it offers the reader an instructive glimpse into what the future might hold for this country." Marjorie Agosín, Wellesley College "In an important investigation of Chile after September 11, 1973, the authors and editors have effectively linked particular events and trends in the recent Chilean past with patterns of globalization in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This excellent collection will be of most use to specialists but also may be rewarding for graduate students interested in recent Chilean history and society." Hispanic American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Although Chile once again enjoys democracy, the legacies of dictatorship & authoritarian governments lasting two decades remain powerful influences on the contemporary liberal state. This conference explored the continuing relevance of the rightist coup of September 1973.
Main Description
In the 1990s, Latin America emerged from the horror of massive and systematic human rights violations as the region returned to civilian-elected regimes. Many hoped that such transitions would bring about significant political, economic and cultural change: the rebuilding a more democratic order based on a 'culture of human rights' that would reinvigorate democratic practices in the region. Despite the change in political regimes, such aspirations have come up against the 'recalcitrant realities' of enduring military enclaves demanding impunity for past crimes, the persistence of neo-liberal economics, ineffective and, in some cases, corrupt government coalitions, as well as the seemingly insatiable demands of private domestic and international capital for 'flexible' labour and unregulated capital flows. The tragic events of 9/11 have become so pivotal in current debates on US domestic and foreign policy, that the 'other' 9/11, that which took place three decades ago in Chile, seems to have been relegated to a distant footnote. This volume aims to re-examine Chile's 9/11 -- a historically and symbolically charged event -- and to explore the lasting legacy of the transformations brought about by the oppressive regimes of the '70s and '80s as they are being experienced today in the cultural, social and intellectual life of the region.
Main Description
In the 1990s, Latin America emerged from the horror of massive and systematic human rights violations as the region returned to civilian-elected regimes. Many hoped that such transitions would bring about significant political, economic and cultural change: the rebuilding a more democratic order based on a 'culture of human rights' that would reinvigorate democratic practices in the region. This volume aims to explore the lasting legacy of the transformations brought about by the oppressive regimes of the '70s and '80s as they are being experienced today in the cultural, social and intellectual life of the region.
Main Description
In the 1990s, Latin America emerged from the horror of massive and systematic human rights violations as the region returned to civilian elected regimes. Many hoped that such transitions would bring about significant political, economic and cultural change-the rebuilding of a more democratic order based on a culture of human rights that would reinvigorate democratic practices in the region. Despite the change in political regimes, such aspirations have come up against the "recalcitrant realities" of enduring military enclaves demanding impunity for past crimes, the persistence of neoliberal economics, ineffective and, in some cases, corrupt government coalitions, as well as the seemingly insatiable demands of private domestic and international capital for flexible labor and unregulated capital flows. This volume aims to re-examine Chile's 9/11-a historically and symbolically charged event-and to explore the lasting legacy of the transformations brought about by the oppressive regimes of the '70s and '80s as they are being experienced today in the cultural, social and intellectual life of the region. Winner of the MACLAS (Middle Atlantic Council of Latin American Studies) Arthur P. Whitaker Prize for best book.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction : three decades after the "other" 9/11p. 1
Finding the Pinochet file : pursuing truth, justice, and historical memory through declassified US documentsp. 14
Chile and the United States thirty years later : return of the repressed?p. 24
Small earthquakes and major eruptions : Anglo-Chilean cultural relations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuriesp. 41
Integration without real participation : the Chilean labor movementp. 59
From Pinochet's state terrorism to the "politics of participation"p. 73
Sustainable development or sustained conflict? : logging companies, neoliberal policies and Mapuche communities in Chilep. 88
Higher education in Chile thirty years after Salvador Allende : privatization, mass education, profits and exclusionp. 99
Pinochet : a study in impunityp. 116
Alternative "pasts" in post-Pinochet Chile : the relation of history/fiction and the subjectification of historyp. 131
Ephemeral histories : public art as political practice in Santiago, Chile, 1970-1973p. 142
Remembering the future : the narrative politics of Jose Miguel Varasp. 154
The marginal on the inside : nannies and maids in Chilean cultural production (1982-2000)p. 163
Exporting Chile : film and literature after 1973p. 178
Me moria : aesthetics, documentary and the creation of nostalgia in Patricio Guzman's Chile, memoria obstinadap. 185
Reception and censorship of a Chilean documentary : the plight of Fernando is backp. 192
Re/coiling inscription : incisive moments in Diamela Eltit and Jacques Derridap. 202
Epilogue : the struggle for truth and justice in Chile and the challenges of Latin American democracyp. 214
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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