Catalogue


Plain folk's fight : the Civil War and Reconstruction in Piney Woods Georgia /
Mark V. Wetherington.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2005.
description
383 p.
ISBN
0807829633 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2005.
isbn
0807829633 (alk. paper)
contents note
On the cotton frontier -- Into a revolution -- We will be ready to march -- The contest for my country -- I represent the war -- Not in the flesh again -- We done honor to ourselves -- The land is full of poverty and misery -- We lift our hat to the wire grass region.
catalogue key
5606797
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark V. Wetherington is director of the Filson Historical Society in Louisville, Kentucky, and author of the award-winning The New South Comes to Wiregrass Georgia, 1860-1910
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-07-01:
Surveys of motives encouraging participation in the US Civil War invariably center on slavery and the slave system. Often forgotten are the motives that promoted participation among the thousands of common southerners who filled the ranks of the Confederate Army. Wetherington (Filson Historical Society, Lexington, KY) breaks new ground in revealing sources of support for the Confederacy among the plain folk in the wire grass region of southern Georgia. Breaking with the standard view that the plain folk merely fought the battles for the slaveholding elite, Wetherington instead argues that common southerners in this region fought to preserve the way of life peculiar to their own neighborhoods. As the destruction of the war intruded deeper into Georgia, many of these same men called for an end to the fighting to preserve remaining resources necessary to sustain their communities in the war's aftermath. Impressive research supports Wetherington's refreshing reconsideration of common southerners' perceptions of the war and Reconstruction. His book is certain to attract attention from Civil War scholars and will prove entertaining for the interested public. It will offer an excellent perspective for debate in graduate seminars and will serve as a captivating study in undergraduate southern history courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. S. C. Hyde Southeastern Louisiana University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Impressive research supports Wetherington's refreshing reconsideration of common southerners' perceptions of the war and Reconstruction. His book is certain to attract attention from Civil War scholars and will prove entertaining for the interested public. . . . Highly Recommended."--Choice
"Impressive research supports Wetherington's refreshing reconsideration of common southerners' perceptions of the war and Reconstruction. His book is certain to attract attention from Civil War scholars and will prove entertaining for the interested public. . . . Highly Recommended." -- Choice
"Impressive research supports Wetherington's refreshing reconsideration of common southerners' perceptions of the war and Reconstruction. His book is certain to attract attention from Civil War scholars and will prove entertaining for the interested public. . . . Highly Recommended." _ Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2006
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Summaries
Long Description
In an examination of the effects of the Civil War on the rural Southern home front, Mark V. Wetherington looks closely at the experiences of white "plain folk"--mostly yeoman farmers and craftspeople--in the wiregrass region of southern Georgia before, during, and after the war. Although previous scholars have argued that common people in the South fought the battles of the region's elites, Wetherington contends that the plain folk in this Georgia region fought for their own self-interest.Plain folk, whose communities were outside areas in which slaves were the majority of the population, feared black emancipation would allow former slaves to move from cotton plantations to subsistence areas like their piney woods communities. Thus, they favored secession, defended their way of life by fighting in the Confederate army, and kept the antebellum patriarchy intact in their home communities. Unable by late 1864 to sustain a two-front war in Virginia and at home, surviving veterans took their fight to the local political arena, where they used paramilitary tactics and ritual violence to defeat freedpeople and their white Republican allies, preserving a white patriarchy that relied on ex-Confederate officers for a new generation of leadership.
Main Description
In an examination of the effects of the Civil War on the rural Southern home front, Mark V. Wetherington looks closely at the experiences of white "plain folk"--mostly yeoman farmers and craftspeople--in the wiregrass region of southern Georgia before, during, and after the war. Although previous scholars have argued that common people in the South fought the battles of the region's elites, Wetherington contends that the plain folk in this Georgia region fought for their own self-interest. Plain folk, whose communities were outside areas in which slaves were the majority of the population, feared black emancipation would allow former slaves to move from cotton plantations to subsistence areas like their piney woods communities. Thus, they favored secession, defended their way of life by fighting in the Confederate army, and kept the antebellum patriarchy intact in their home communities. Unable by late 1864 to sustain a two-front war in Virginia and at home, surviving veterans took their fight to the local political arena, where they used paramilitary tactics and ritual violence to defeat freedpeople and their white Republican allies, preserving a white patriarchy that relied on ex-Confederate officers for a new generation of leadership.
Main Description
Wetherington examines the local effects of the Civil War on a section of southern Georgia, in part of the region known as Wiregrass Country. The author looks closely at the experiences of white "plain folk"--mostly yeoman farmers and craftspeople--who feared that emancipation would encourage freed slaves to move from cotton plantations into the piney woods communities they had claimed for themselves.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Civil War was not just a rich man's war to rural whites.
Table of Contents
Prologue: Plain Folkp. 1
On the Cotton Frontierp. 11
Into a Revolutionp. 45
We Will Be Ready to Marchp. 81
The Contest for My Countryp. 113
I Represent the Warp. 147
Not in the Flesh Againp. 179
We Done Honor to Ourselvesp. 201
The Land Is Full of Poverty and Miseryp. 231
We Lift Our Hat to the Wire Grass Regionp. 261
Epilogue: Losing the Peacep. 295
Notesp. 307
Bibliographyp. 349
Indexp. 367
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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