Catalogue


The empire triumphant : race, religion and rebellion in the Star wars films /
Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2005.
description
ix, 214 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
078642219X (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2005.
isbn
078642219X (softcover : alk. paper)
abstract
"The first topic of this examination is how the films use the language of colonialism to emphasize the idea of imperialism. Next the author looks at how Asian influences provide a subtext for much of the action. Then turns to the representation of people of color in the Star Wars universe, and how other ethnicities are represented overall" -- Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
5606669
 
Filmography: p. 201-208.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-200) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr., is a professor of theater at Loyola Marymount University
Summaries
Main Description
George Lucas's first Star Wars trilogy shows the influences of its era; Cold War tension is evident in its theme of rebellion against totalitarianism. Recent entries in the Star Wars saga--The Phantom Menace (1999) and Attack of the Clones (2002)--are much more concerned with evil corporations, terrorists, and the corruption of the political process. Each film is influenced by the times in which it was released, but also by cultural subtexts and by other films that had direct and indirect effects on Lucas as writer, producer, and director. This work focuses on all six Star Wars films. The first topic of this multifaceted examination is how the films use the language of colonialism (The Rebellion, The Empire) to emphasize the idea of imperialism. Next the author looks at how Asian influences--including religious undertones from Taoism and Buddhism and the works of Kurosawa and other Asian filmmakers--provide a subtext for much of the action. Next the discussion turns to the representation of people of color in the Star Wars universe, and how other ethnicities are represented overall, particularly through the literalization of the word aliens. These topics of discussion provide for penetrating conclusions about Lucas's films and how they represent race, religion, and rebellion.
Main Description
George Lucas's first Star Wars trilogy shows the influences of its era; Cold War tension is evident in its theme of rebellion against totalitarianism. Recent entries in the Star Wars saga--The Phantom Menace (1999) and Attack of the Clones (2002)--are much more concerned with evil corporations, terrorists, and the corruption of the political process. Each film is influenced by the times in which it was released, but also by cultural subtexts and by other films that had direct and indirect effects on Lucas as writer, producer, and director.This work focuses on all six Star Wars films. The first topic of this multifaceted examination is how the films use the language of colonialism ("The" Rebellion, "The" Empire) to emphasize the idea of imperialism. Next the author looks at how Asian influences--including religious undertones from Taoism and Buddhism and the works of Kurosawa and other Asian filmmakers--provide a subtext for much of the action. Next the discussion turns to the representation of people of color in the Star Wars universe, and how other ethnicities are represented overall, particularly through the literalization of the word "aliens." These topics of discussion provide for penetrating conclusions about Lucas's films and how they represent race, religion, and rebellion.
Main Description
George Lucas's first Star Wars trilogy shows Cold War tension in its theme of rebellion against totalitarianism. The films of the second trilogy are more concerned with evil corporations, terrorists, and the corruption of the political process. Each film is influenced by its era, as well as by cultural subtexts and by films that affected Lucas as writer, producer, and director.
Description for Library
"The first topic of this examination is how the films use the language of colonialism to emphasize the idea of imperialism. Next the author looks at how Asian influences provide a subtext for much of the action. Then turns to the representation of people of color in the Star Wars universe, and how other ethnicities are represented overall"--Provided by publisher.
Long Description
This work focuses on the themes, influences and cultural subtexts of the Star Wars series. The first topic of this multifaceted examination is how the films use the language of colonialism ("The" Rebellion, "The" Empire) to emphasize the idea of imperialism. Next the author looks at how Asian influences provide a subtext for much of the action. The discussion then turns to the representation of people of color in the Star Wars universe, and how other ethnicities are represented overall, particularly through the literalization of the word "aliens."
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: Of Fanon and Fanboysp. 1
Frantz Fanon in a Galaxy Far, Far Away, or What Is an Empire Without Colonies?p. 19
The Power of Mythmaking / May the Tao Be with You: Myth, Religion and Star Warsp. 78
"Help Me, Kurosawa Akira, You're My Only Hope": Asian Culture and Star Warsp. 102
"Making the Galaxy Safe for White People": People of Color in the Star Wars Universep. 126
"Bridge on the Planet Naboo": Asians (and Others) as Aliensp. 151
Conclusion: The Empire Triumphant: Cultural Appropriation and Postcolonial Discoursep. 184
Chapter Notesp. 189
Filmographyp. 201
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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