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Québec during the American invasion, 1775-1776 : the journal of François Baby, Gabriel Taschereau, and Jenkin Williams /
Michael P. Gabriel, editor ; S. Pascale Vergereau-Dewey, translator.
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, 2005.
description
xlv, 141 p.
ISBN
0870137409 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Most historians assume that Canadians failed to support the American invasion of Canada in 1775. Through his superb introduction and editing of this largely unknown collection of reports by French Canadian seigneurs and priests, Michael Gabriel shows that only extensive controls and (relatively mild) punishments implemented by Governor Sir Guy Carleton and the French Canadian elite were able to prevent the Americans from receiving a good deal of support that was actually there. Gabriel's work makes the American invasion seem less foolish, more a plausible effort to liberate a sympathetic people than a blatant conquest, than it ever has in the historical literature. It also adds to the reputation of Carleton, one of the few competent generals the British possessed during the war."
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Summaries
Long Description
Available for the first time in English, the 1776 journal of Franois Baby, Gabriel Taschereau, and Jenkin Williams provides an insight into the failure to incite rebellion in Quebec by American revolutionaries. While other sources have shown how British soldiers and civilians and the French-Canadian gentry (the seigneurs) responded to the American invasion of 1775-1776, this journal focuses on French-Canadian peasants, les habitants, who made up the vast majority of the population; in other words, the journal helps explain why Quebec did not become the "fourteenth colony." After American forces were expelled from Quebec in early 1776, British governor Sir Guy Carleton sent three trusted envoys to discover who collaborated with the rebels from the south. They traveled to fifty-six parishes and missions in the Quebec and Trois Rivieres district, discharging disloyal militia officers, and replacing them with faithful subjects. They prepared a report on each parish, revealing actions taken to support the Americans or the king. Baby and his colleagues documented a wide range of responses. Some habitants enlisted with the Americans; others supplied them with food, firewood, and transportation. Some habitants refused to co-operate with the king's soldiers. In some parishes, women were the Americans' most zealous supporters. Overall, the Baby Journal clearly reveals that the habitants played an important, but often overlooked, role in the American invasion.
Main Description
Available for the first time in English, the 1776 journal of Fran ois Baby, Gabriel Taschereau, and Jenkin Williams provides an insight into the failure to incite rebellion in Quebec by American revolutionaries. While other sources have shown how British soldiers and civilians and the French-Canadian gentry (the seigneurs) responded to the American invasion of 1775–1776, this journal focuses on French-Canadian peasants (les habitants) who made up the vast majority of the population; in other words, the journal helps explain why Quebec did not become the "fourteenth colony." After American forces were expelled from Quebec in early 1776, the British governor, Sir Guy Carleton, sent three trusted envoys to discover who had collaborated with the rebels from the south. They traveled to fifty-six parishes and missions in the Quebec and Trois Rivi res district, discharging disloyal militia officers and replacing them with faithful subjects. They prepared a report on each parish, revealing actions taken to support the Americans or the king. Baby and his colleagues documented a wide range of responses. Some habitants enlisted with the Americans; others supplied them with food, firewood, and transportation. Some habitants refused to cooperate with the king’s soldiers. In some parishes, women were the Americans’ most zealous supporters. Overall, the Baby Journal clearly reveals that the habitants played an important, but often overlooked, role in the American invasion.
Main Description
Available for the first time in English, the 1776 journal of Fran ois Baby, Gabriel Taschereau, and Jenkin Williams provides an insight into the failure to incite rebellion in Quebec by American revolutionaries. While other sources have shown how British soldiers and civilians and the French-Canadian gentry (the seigneurs) respondedto the American invasion of 1775 1776, this journal focuses on French-Canadian peasants (les habitants) who made up the vast majority of the population; in other words, the journal helps explain why Quebec did not become the "fourteenth colony."After American forces were expelled from Quebec in early 1776, the British governor, Sir Guy Carleton, sent three trusted envoys to discover who had collaborated with the rebels from the south. They traveled to fifty-six parishes and missions in the Quebec and Trois Rivi res district, discharging disloyal militia officers and replacing them with faithful subjects. They prepared a report on each parish, revealing actions taken to support the Americans or the king. Baby and his colleagues documented a wide range of responses. Some habitants enlisted with the Americans; others supplied them with food, firewood, and transportation. Some habitants refused to cooperate with the king s soldiers. In some parishes, women were the Americans most zealous supporters. Overall, the Baby Journal clearly reveals that the habitants played an important, but often overlooked, role in the American invasion.
Main Description
Available for the first time in English, the 1776 journal of François Baby, Gabriel Taschereau, and Jenkin Williams provides an insight into the failure to incite rebellion in Quebec by American revolutionaries. While other sources have shown how British soldiers and civilians and the French-Canadian gentry (the seigneurs) responded to the American invasion of 17751776, this journal focuses on French-Canadian peasants (les habitants) who made up the vast majority of the population; in other words, the journal helps explain why Quebec did not become the "fourteenth colony." After American forces were expelled from Quebec in early 1776, the British governor, Sir Guy Carleton, sent three trusted envoys to discover who had collaborated with the rebels from the south. They traveled to fifty-six parishes and missions in the Quebec and Trois Rivières district, discharging disloyal militia officers and replacing them with faithful subjects. They prepared a report on each parish, revealing actions taken to support the Americans or the king. Baby and his colleagues documented a wide range of responses. Some habitants enlisted with the Americans; others supplied them with food, firewood, and transportation. Some habitants refused to cooperate with the king's soldiers. In some parishes, women were the Americans' most zealous supporters. Overall, the Baby Journal clearly reveals that the habitants played an important, but often overlooked, role in the American invasion.
Unpaid Annotation
Available for the first time in English, the 1776 journal of François Baby, Gabriel Taschereau, and Jenkin Williams provides an insight into the failure to incite rebellion in Quebec by American Revolutionaries. While other sources have shown how British soldiers and civilians and the French-Canadian gentry (the seigneurs) responded to the American invasion of 1775–1776, this journal focuses on French-Canadian peasants, les habitants, who made up the vast majority of the population; in other words, the Baby Journal helps explain why Quebec did not become America's "fourteenth colony." After American forces were expelled from Quebec in early 1776, British governor Sir Guy Carleton sent three trusted envoys to discover who collaborated with the rebels from the south. They traveled to fifty-six parishes and missions in the Quebec and Trois Riviéres district, discharging disloyal militia officers, and replacing them with faithful subjects. They prepared a report on each parish, revealing actions taken to support the Americans or the king. Baby and his colleagues documented a wide range of responses. Some habitants enlisted with the Americans; others supplied them with food, firewood, and transportation. Some habitants refused to cooperate with the king's soldiers. In some parishes, women were the Americans' most zealous supporters. Overall, the Baby Journal clearly reveals that the habitants played an important, but often overlooked, role in the American invasion.
Unpaid Annotation
The 1776 journal of Francois Baby, Gabriel Taschereau and Jenkin Williams provides an insight into the failure to incite rebellion in Quebec by American revolutionaries. The journal focuses on French-Canadian peasants, who made up the majority of the population; and helps explain why Quebec did not become the "fourteenth colony".

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