Catalogue


Jewish scholarship and culture in nineteenth-century Germany : between history and faith /
Nils H. Roemer.
imprint
Madison Wisconsin : The University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.
description
x, 251 p.
ISBN
0299211703 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison Wisconsin : The University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.
isbn
0299211703 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5563150
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nils Roemer is the Ian Karten Lecturer in Jewish History at the University of Southampton
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-03-01:
Challenging the widely held assumptions that assimilation, secularization, and cultural decline colored 19th-century German-Jewish history, this thoughtfully crafted book has much to offer its readers. Roemer (Univ. of Southampton) moves deftly through the maze of German-Jewish historiography, tracing its gradual evolution from an intellectual to a popularizing force by the fin de siecle, and illuminating how the historical craft (known as Wissenschaft des Judentums) helped to revitalize and reshape cultural and religious identity among Germany's literate Jewish population in the face of modernization and emancipation. The author demonstrates how through their scholarship, German-Jewish historians were able to reacquaint German Jews with their past and simultaneously speak to contemporary concerns. But, as Roemer explains at length, the educational strides achieved by German-Jewish historiography proved controversial among the Orthodox, Reform, and Zionist communities. Readers are also treated to a stimulating discussion of the development and expansion of Jewish literary associations and their membership. In general, Roemer has written an erudite monograph that should be read by all serious students of German-Jewish history. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. Shevin-Coetzee formerly, George Washington University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2006
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Summaries
Main Description
German Jews were fully assimilated and secularized in the nineteenth century-or so it is commonly assumed. In Jewish Scholarship and Culture in the Nineteenth Century , Nils Roemer challenges this assumption, finding that religious sentiments, concepts, and rhetoric found expression through a newly emerging theological historicism at the center of modern German Jewish culture. Modern German Jewish identity developed during the struggle for emancipation, debates about religious and cultural renewal, and battles against anti-Semitism. A key component of this identity was historical memory, which Jewish scholars had begun to infuse with theological perspectives beginning in the 1850s. After German reunification in the early 1870s, Jewish intellectuals reevaluated their enthusiastic embrace of liberalism and secularism. Without abandoning the ideal of tolerance, they asserted a right to cultural religious difference for themselves--an ideal they held to even more tightly in the face of growing anti-Semitism. This newly re-theologized Jewish history, Roemer argues, helped German Jews fend off anti-Semitic attacks by strengthening their own sense of their culture and tradition.
Unpaid Annotation
German Jews were fully assimilated and secularized in the nineteenth century--or so it is commonly assumed. In "Jewish Scholarship and Culture in the Nineteenth Century, Nils Roemer challenges this assumption, finding that religious sentiments, concepts, and rhetoric found expression through a newly emerging theological historicism at the center of modern German Jewish culture. Modern German Jewish identity developed during the struggle for emancipation, debates about religious and cultural renewal, and battles against anti-Semitism. A key component of this identity was historical memory, which Jewish scholars had begun to infuse with theological perspectives beginning in the 1850s. After German reunification in the early 1870s, Jewish intellectuals reevaluated their enthusiastic embrace of liberalism and secularism. Without abandoning the ideal of tolerance, they asserted a right to cultural religious difference for themselves--an ideal they held to even more tightly in the face of growing anti-Semitism. This newly re-theologized Jewish history, Roemer argues, helped German Jews fend off anti-Semitic attacks by strengthening their own sense of their culture and tradition.
Bowker Data Service Summary
German Jews were fully assimilated and secularised in the 19th century - or were they? Nils Roemer challenges this assumption, finding that religious sentiments, concepts and rhetoric found expression through a newly emerging theological historicism at the center of modern German Jewish culture.
Main Description
German Jews were fully assimilated and secularized in the nineteenth centuryor so it is commonly assumed. In Jewish Scholarship and Culture in the Nineteenth Century, Nils Roemer challenges this assumption, finding that religious sentiments, concepts, and rhetoric found expression through a newly emerging theological historicism at the center of modern German Jewish culture. Modern German Jewish identity developed during the struggle for emancipation, debates about religious and cultural renewal, and battles against anti-Semitism. A key component of this identity was historical memory, which Jewish scholars had begun to infuse with theological perspectives beginning in the 1850s. After German reunification in the early 1870s, Jewish intellectuals reevaluated their enthusiastic embrace of liberalism and secularism. Without abandoning the ideal of tolerance, they asserted a right to cultural religious difference for themselves--an ideal they held to even more tightly in the face of growing anti-Semitism. This newly re-theologized Jewish history, Roemer argues, helped German Jews fend off anti-Semitic attacks by strengthening their own sense of their culture and tradition.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
Historicizing Judaism
Between Theology and Historyp. 15
Returning Judaism to Historyp. 26
Recovering Jewish History in the Age of Emancipation and Reformp. 35
Fissures and Unity
Jewish Historiography at the Center of Debatep. 49
"Bringing Forth Their Past Glories"p. 60
Finding Common Ground in the Creation of a German Jewish Reading Publicp. 71
Challenges and Responses
Wissenschaft on Trialp. 81
History as a Shield of Judaismp. 92
Reconciling the Hearts of the Parents with the Hearts of the Childrenp. 101
Reading Jewish History in the Fin De Siecle
Past, Present, and Future of Jewish History: Between Hope and Despairp. 111
The Jewish Past at the Center of Popular Culturep. 124
Libraries with and without Wallsp. 132
Conclusionp. 143
Notesp. 155
Bibliographyp. 215
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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