Catalogue


Living with transition in Laos : market integration in Southeast Asia /
Jonathan Rigg.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
description
xviii, 235 p. : ill., map.
ISBN
0415355648 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
isbn
0415355648 (alk. paper)
contents note
Managing and coping with transitions -- New poverty and old poverty -- Subsistence affluence or subsistence struggle? -- Poverty, inequality and exclusion -- The best of intentions--policy-induced poverty -- Not in our hands--market-induced poverty and social differentiation -- Making livelihoods work -- Muddled spaces, juggled lives.
catalogue key
5562858
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jonathan Rigg is a geographer based at the University of Durham and, formerly, at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Laos - the Lao People's Democratic Republic - is one of the least understood and studied countries of Asia. Its development trajectory is also one of the most interesting, as it moves from state, or perhaps more appropriately subsistence, to market. Based on extensive original research, this book assesses how economic transition and marketisation are being translated into progress (or not) at the local level, and at the resulting impact on poverty, inequality and livelihoods. It concludes that the process of transition in fact contributes to the growth of poverty for some people, and shows how people manage to cope in very unfavourable circumstances.
Main Description
Laos - the Lao People's Democratic Republic - is one of the least understood and studied countries of Asia. Its development trajectory is also one of the most interesting as it negotiates the transition from subsistence to dependence, from command to market and, in the longer term the government hopes, from poverty to prosperity. A node of poverty lying at the geographical core of the world's most dynamic region, Laos is being progressively drawn into the wider Greater Mekong sub-region. The spatial, market and mental integration of the population of Laos is advancing as boundaries become more permeable, mobility rises and, more generally, as people are drawn into the mainstream. Drawing on original field work and unpublished reports, and taking an individual and household viewpoint, the book examines and assesses the effects of these transitions on poverty, inequality and livelihoods. Book jacket.
Long Description
Laos - the Lao People's Democratic Republic - in one of the least understood and studied countries of Asia. Its development trajectory is also one of the most interesting, as it moves from state, or perhaps more appropriately, subsistence, to market, at the same time as finding itself in a key geographical position in the fast-changing southeast Asian region, where, with boundaries more permeable, and new patterns of spatial integration forming, a new Greater Mekong sub-region is emerging. Based on extensive original research, this book, unlike others on Laos which concentrate on the macroeconomic picture, assesses how economic transition and marketization are being translated into progress (or not) at the local level, and at the resulting impact on poverty, inequality and livelihoods. It concludes that the process of transition in fact contributes to the growth of poverty for some people, and shows how people manage to cope in very unfavorable circumstances.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. viii
Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgementsp. xv
List of abbreviations and termsp. xvii
Managing and coping with transitionsp. 1
Setting the scene: structures and agenciesp. 1
Building the argumentp. 3
Managing and coping with transitionp. 9
Market transition and frissonp. 14
Setting the contextp. 17
New poverty and old poverty: livelihoods and transition in Laosp. 19
Picturing Laos: alternative visionsp. 19
Developing Laos: reforming and revitalising the economyp. 20
Economics or development: creating or ameliorating poverty?p. 24
Envisioning 'old' poverty and 'new' povertyp. 25
Livelihoods, stasis and transitionp. 35
Subsistence affluence or subsistence struggle? Unpicking tradition and illuminating the pastp. 43
Introductionp. 43
Problematising the pastp. 44
Rural livelihoods: abundance and scarcityp. 54
Subsistence affluence or subsistence struggle?p. 69
Poverty, inequality and exclusionp. 71
Introductionp. 71
The national picture of poverty in Laosp. 72
Growth, transition and inequality: a primerp. 83
Social exclusionp. 86
Gender and inequalityp. 94
Summaryp. 98
Constructing the casep. 99
The best of intentions: policy-induced povertyp. 101
Introductionp. 101
Policies, poverty (and the minorities)p. 102
Area-based development: the Focal Site strategy and the Land-Forest Allocation programmep. 103
Conclusionp. 123
Not in our hands: market-induced poverty and social differentiationp. 125
Pro-poor and anti-poor marketisationp. 125
Silver bullets: roads, remoteness and marketsp. 126
Market integration and social differentiationp. 132
Forests, livelihoods and marketisationp. 138
Culture, power and Inequalityp. 147
Making livelihoods workp. 149
Things aren't that badp. 149
Occupational multiplicity and pluriactivityp. 150
Breaking with the past?p. 151
Predictability and contingency in identifying households at riskp. 161
Structure, context and contingency: conceptualising poverty and building 'livelihood footprints'p. 167
Conclusion: reflecting on the production and re-production of povertyp. 175
Putting it togetherp. 179
Muddled spaces, juggled livesp. 181
Poverty, transition and livelihoodsp. 181
Modernisation or development?p. 188
Notesp. 191
Appendices
Summary information on published and unpublished field studies mentioned in textp. 198
Table relating to Chapter 2p. 201
Table and figures relating to Chapter 3p. 202
Tables and figures relating to Chapter 4p. 205
Table and figure relating to Chapter 7p. 212
Bibliographyp. 214
Indexp. 230
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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