Catalogue


Karl Kraus, apocalyptic satirist, : the post-war crisis and the rise of the Swastika /
Edward Timms.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2005.
description
xxi, 639 p.
ISBN
030010751X (cl. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2005.
isbn
030010751X (cl. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5562540
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Edward Timms is Research Professor in History at the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, University of Sussex and a Life Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-03-01:
With this second volume of his biography of Kraus (v. 1, CH, Mar'87), Timms (history, Univ. of Sussex, UK) establishes himself as the premier Kraus scholar writing in English. This book is as much a major study of Austria and Germany between the wars as it is biography and analysis of Kraus's work, which once enjoyed high regard outside Austria. Kraus worked ceaselessly to raise the standard of moral literacy in Europe, drawing creative inspiration from Shakespeare, Goethe, Offenbach, and Johann Nestroy. A monarchist turned pacifist during WW I turned supporter of the authoritarian Austrian state before the Anschluss of 1938 (perceiving it as the lesser of evils), Kraus fought untiringly with his pen as a writer, his voice as a performer, and his legal skills as a litigator to ward off catastrophe in Europe. The list of his enemies is intimidating, but the list of his friends and supporters is even more impressive (Bertolt Brecht, Walter Benjamin, Elias Canetti, Ernst Krenek, Arnold Schoenberg, Sidonie Nadherny). Kraus' reputation was slow to revive after WW II, but now scholars recognize his contributions. Marked by impeccable scholarship and fine style, this book lacks only a bibliography (which is tucked away in the notes). ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels. R. C. Conard University of Dayton
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Edward Timms meticulously interprets this major writer's most complex period of literary, cultural, and political activity, providing what amounts to an entire cultural history of the period."--Professor Gilbert Carr, Trinity College Dublin
�Edward Timms meticulously interprets this major writer�s most complex period of literary, cultural, and political activity, providing what amounts to an entire cultural history of the period.��Professor Gilbert Carr, Trinity College Dublin
Edward Timms meticulously interprets this major writer s most complex period of literary, cultural, and political activity, providing what amounts to an entire cultural history of the period. Professor Gilbert Carr, Trinity College Dublin
"Edward Timms meticulously interprets this major writer's most complex period of literary, cultural, and political activity, providing what amounts to an entire cultural history of the period."Professor Gilbert Carr, Trinity College Dublin
"Edward Timms meticulously interprets this major writer's most complex period of literary, cultural, and political activity, providing what amounts to an entire cultural history of the period."-Professor Gilbert Carr, Trinity College Dublin
"Timms establishes himself as the premier Kraus scholar writing in English. . . . Marked by impeccable scholarship and fine style. . . Essential."
�Timms establishes himself as the premier Kraus scholar writing in English. . . . Marked by impeccable scholarship and fine style. . . Essential.�
Timms establishes himself as the premier Kraus scholar writing in English. . . . Marked by impeccable scholarship and fine style. . . Essential.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Edward Timms continues to explore the life & works of satirist Karl Kraus. This volume covers the years between the world wars & the various roles played by Kraus in responding to the political developments of the time.
Long Description
In this second volume of "Karl Kraus: Apocalyptic Satirist, "Edward Timms takes up Kraus's story in November 1918, when the satirist responded to the creation of the new republics with a defiant hope, invoking international law against the dual threat of reactionary politics and irresponsible media. While contemporaries like Walter Benjamin regarded Kraus as heroically isolated, this book places him within a dynamic field of cultural production. Timms highlights the court cases Kraus pursued with his lawyer Oskar Samek and the theatrical projects that earned him Brecht's friendship. In the final section of the book, the author refutes the legend that Kraus responded with stunned silence to Hitler's seizure of power. His career culminated in "Third Walpurgis Night, "an analysis of Nazi ideology that has proved enduringly influential. Timms concludes that Kraus's lifelong critique of the media, combining Orwell's political radicalism with Joyce's linguistic playfulness, incisively anticipates the propaganda techniques of our own age.
Main Description
In this second volume ofKarl Kraus: Apocalyptic Satirist,Edward Timms takes up Kraus's story in November 1918, when the satirist responded to the creation of the new republics with a defiant hope, invoking international law against the dual threat of reactionary politics and irresponsible media. While contemporaries like Walter Benjamin regarded Kraus as heroically isolated, this book places him within a dynamic field of cultural production. Timms highlights the court cases Kraus pursued with his lawyer Oskar Samek and the theatrical projects that earned him Brecht's friendship. In the final section of the book, the author refutes the legend that Kraus responded with stunned silence to Hitler's seizure of power. His career culminated inThird Walpurgis Night,an analysis of Nazi ideology that has proved enduringly influential. Timms concludes that Kraus's lifelong critique of the media, combining Orwell's political radicalism with Joyce's linguistic playfulness, incisively anticipates the propaganda techniques of our own age.
Main Description
In this second volume of Karl Kraus: Apocalyptic Satirist,Edward Timms takes up Kraus's story in November 1918, when the satirist responded to the creation of the new republics with a defiant hope, invoking international law against the dual threat of reactionary politics and irresponsible media. While contemporaries like Walter Benjamin regarded Kraus as heroically isolated, this book places him within a dynamic field of cultural production. Timms highlights the court cases Kraus pursued with his lawyer Oskar Samek and the theatrical projects that earned him Brecht's friendship.In the final section of the book, the author refutes the legend that Kraus responded with stunned silence to Hitler's seizure of power. His career culminated in Third Walpurgis Night,an analysis of Nazi ideology that has proved enduringly influential. Timms concludes that Kraus's lifelong critique of the media, combining Orwell's political radicalism with Joyce's linguistic playfulness, incisively anticipates the propaganda techniques of our own age.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Prefacep. xv
List of Abbreviationsp. xx
Apocalypse Postponed
The Post-War German Mentalityp. 3
Innocent Victimizers and the Rise of the Swastikap. 4
At War with Nature: The Buffalo and the Herdp. 11
Creeping Fascism and the German Saviourp. 15
Austrian Identity Politicsp. 21
Divided Loyalties in 'German-Austria'p. 21
The Antisemitic Consensusp. 27
Citizenship, Self-Hatred and Self-Esteemp. 33
Austrian Amnesia and the Executions at Kragujevacp. 38
International Law and the Clash of Civilizationsp. 41
Kant and the International Court of Justicep. 41
Bolshevism as a Moral Problemp. 46
Masaryk and Multicultural Democracyp. 50
French Rapprochement and Chinese Dreamp. 56
Ink, Technology and Deathp. 64
Diplomats, Telegrams and Liesp. 64
Propaganda and Poison Gasp. 68
The Phrases We're Ruled Byp. 77
Weapons of Mass Deceptionp. 79
Promotional Trips to Hellp. 81
Culture and the Press
From the Jungle of Press Freedomp. 87
The New Journalismp. 87
Snapshot Photography and Antisemitic Caricaturep. 95
Advertising Scamsp. 98
The Misused Miraclep. 101
Power without Responsibilityp. 102
The Cultural Fieldp. 105
Red Viennap. 105
Circles, Clubs and Coffee-housesp. 107
The Christian and Pan-German Campsp. 111
Public Morality and Erotic Revolutionp. 116
Polarizing Tendencies and the Radicalism of the Centrep. 120
The Scene of Writingp. 123
Between the Study and the Streetp. 123
Polyphonic Voicesp. 129
Gutenberg and the 'Brungled Imboglio'p. 132
The Chimera of Languagep. 137
Conceptual Muddlesp. 137
Reanimated Metaphorsp. 143
Linguistic Decay and Mongrel Languagep. 146
Apocalyptic Tone and Mosaic Stylep. 152
The Creative Origin
Childhood, Myth and Memoryp. 159
The Battered Childp. 159
Pedagogic Reform and Education for Humanityp. 163
Rewriting the Freudian Scriptp. 167
Dream-Plays and Anal Psychologistsp. 174
Archetype and Experiencep. 178
Images of Women and Shadows from the Pastp. 180
A Private Nemesisp. 180
Sexual Ambivalencep. 184
Eros, Thanatos and the Poetsp. 187
How Women Experience Menp. 196
Almost Too Much Lovep. 199
The Faith of a Jewish Renegadep. 208
Forward Striding and Forsakennessp. 210
Promised Lands and Chosen Placesp. 213
Artistic and Divine Creationp. 218
The Long Breath of Languagep. 221
Origins and Angelsp. 223
Expressionist Politics and Constructions of the 'Other'p. 227
Fellow Travellers and the Syntax of Collective Experiencep. 227
Goebbels and the Emotional Bonds of Communityp. 231
Werfel as Inner Antagonistp. 234
Rilke and the 'mentalite juive'p. 236
Mirror Menp. 240
Defending the Republic
Satire and Social Democracyp. 249
Friedrich Austerlitz and the Capitalist Pressp. 250
Otto Bauer and the Bourgeois Worldp. 253
Karl Seitz, Ghosts and Parasitesp. 257
David Bach and the Socialist Cultural Idealp. 260
Marxism on Moral Foundationsp. 266
The Twisted Crossp. 268
Friedrich Funder and the Newspaper Christiansp. 269
Ignaz Seipel and the Salvaging of Soulsp. 273
Richard Kralik and the Christian-Germanic Idealp. 276
Hofmannsthal, Reinhardt and the Salzburg World Theatrep. 281
'Cloud-Cuckoo-Land'p. 283
The Contest for the Lawp. 287
The Rehabilitation of Justicep. 288
Oskar Samek and the Art of Correctionp. 292
Wall of Judgment and Despairing Righteousnessp. 294
In the Name of the Republicp. 296
Hangman's Justicep. 299
Sharks in the Danubep. 302
Masters of Viennap. 303
The Metaphysics of Sharksp. 308
Stigmatizationp. 311
The Law of Inertia and the Hour of Judgementp. 317
The Redemption of the Cityp. 322
The Destruction of Justicep. 328
Zigzag Tacticsp. 328
The Burning of the Palace of Justicep. 332
Mediocrity Drunk with Powerp. 336
The Wounded Republicp. 339
Beyond Moralityp. 344
The Politics of Performance
Theatre against the Modern Agep. 351
The Good School of the Burgtheaterp. 351
Life Enhancement and Cultural Memoryp. 355
Jargon Theatre and the Dilemma of Assimilationp. 357
Berlin Theatrical Affairsp. 363
The Scene as a Tribunalp. 368
Dramatic Poetry from Shakespeare to Brechtp. 373
Visual Spectacle and Theatre of Poetryp. 373
The Unknown Goethep. 377
Dialogues with Musicp. 382
Epic Theatre, Masks and Songsp. 385
Re-creating Shakespearep. 388
Heine, Nestroy and Satirical Versep. 393
Heine's Versified Journalismp. 393
Rhyme, Resistance and Rapportp. 396
Political Poetry and Acoustic Plausibilityp. 397
Topical Strophes in the Spirit of Nestroyp. 402
The Educated Audience and the Wild Huntp. 409
The Crisis of Musical Culturep. 412
King Lehar and the City of Songsp. 413
Wagner and the Total Art Workp. 421
Musical Ideas: From the Harmonielehre to Lulup. 426
Offenbach and the Aryansp. 433
Double-Tonguing and Role Reversalp. 433
Operatic Politics: From Richard Strauss to Ernst Krenekp. 441
Male-Voice Choirs and Barbaric Melodiesp. 448
Into the Third Reich
Twilight of Democracyp. 455
A German-Austrian Communal Destiny?p. 455
The Enemy Withinp. 460
The Heimwehr as Pacemakers of Fascismp. 464
The Limits of Satirep. 468
Goodbye to Berlinp. 470
Dollfuss and the Defence of Austriap. 473
Bad Timingp. 473
War on Two Frontsp. 478
Double Book-keepingp. 481
Austria as an Orderly Statep. 483
Propaganda Trips to Praguep. 488
Third Walpurgis Nightp. 492
Language and Silencep. 492
Prolixity and Plotp. 496
Goethe and the Laws of Naturep. 503
Shakespeare and Secret Murderp. 505
Hitler's Lethal Synthesisp. 508
Inferiority Complexes and Machismop. 511
National Socialism and the Ethics of Languagep. 516
Modernity, Technology and Newspeakp. 516
Violence, Duplicity and Hit Tunesp. 519
Goebbels the Spin Doctorp. 523
Heidegger's House of Beingp. 528
Diaries in the Nightp. 530
Linguistic-Theological Observationsp. 534
Writing and Erasurep. 539
Epilogue: Apocalypse and Afterp. 543
Karl Kraus in Dachaup. 543
The Post-War German Revivalp. 545
Virtual Realityp. 547
Reference Notesp. 551
Bibliographical Notep. 608
Sources of Illustrationsp. 610
Indexp. 616
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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