Catalogue

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Blood in the sand : imperial fantasies, right-wing ambitions, and the erosion of American democracy /
Stephen Eric Bronner.
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
description
vii, 207 p. : maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0813123674 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
isbn
0813123674 (hardcover : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
5562523
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-05-01:
The title communicates immediately this is not going to be a scholarly, dispassionate work. This collection of essays is organized chronologically, from the war in Afghanistan to that in Iraq. In a typical chapter titled "Dub'ya's Fellow Travelers," Bronner (Rutgers Univ.) takes to task intellectuals on the Left who rallied behind the current war in Iraq. "They never noticed," he writes, "that distinct whiff of the beer-hall putsch that hovered over these feral Republicans." Though they read as throwaway lines, such remarks are meant to carry forward the book's ambition, which is "to develop the framework for a democratic foreign policy." A good foreign policy, Bronner believes, will be multilateral, cosmopolitan, and transparent. Because the "progressive needs of the moment" will not always be clear, the ends of a good foreign policy will be derived as well as justified by its means. Rallying the masses, or at least their vanguard who read university press books, with witty denunciations of such villainous actors as "feral Republicans" will, presumably, bring the US closer to this blessed state of affairs. Despite its stridency, the volume manages to convey genuine insights and is both well written and well produced. ^BSumming Up: Optional. General readers, faculty. T. S. Langston Tulane University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Conveys genuine insights and is both well written and well produced." -- Choice
"Conveys genuine insights and is both well written and well produced.-- Choice" -- Choice
"Explores the roots and consequences of the new drive for US hegemony, and provides plenty of red meat for the left." -- International History Review
"Explores the roots and consequences of the new drive for US hegemony, and provides plenty of red meat for the left.-- International History Review" -- International History Review
"This hard-hitting and intelligent book is a remarkable reflection on the paradoxical moment in which Americans find themselves: citizens of the greatest power in world history, and yet with an acute sense of vulnerability, dominating completely far-away countries like Iraq, and yet barely in control there. Bronner's analysis gives usthe tools to understand how we reached this state,and how we might transcend it." -- Rashid Khalidi, Edward SaidProfessor of Arab Studies, Columbia University, and a
"This hard-hitting and intelligent book is a remarkable reflection on the paradoxical moment in which Americans find themselves: citizens of the greatest power in world history, and yet with an acute sense of vulnerability, dominating completely far-away countries like Iraq, and yet barely in control there. Bronner's analysis gives usthe tools to understand how we reached this state,and how we might transcend it.-- Rashid Khalidi, Edward SaidProfessor of Arab Studies, Columbia University, and author of Resurrecting Empire: WesternFootprints and America's Perilous Path in the MiddleEast" -- Rashid Khalidi, Edward SaidProfessor of Arab Studies, Columbia University, and a
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a critique of American foreign and domestic policy, ranging from the government's initial response to 9/11 and the assault on Afghanistan through the Iraqi War and the ramifications of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Main Description
Following the attacks of September 11, 2001, clouds of ash blackened the skies over New York City, Washington, D.C., and rural Pennsylvania. In the wake of the destruction, the United States seemingly entered a new era marked by radical changes in the nation's discourse and in the policies of the Bush administration. With the toppling of the Taliban in Afghanistan, the invasion of Iraq, and saber rattling elsewhere, America's global war on terror began to take shape. Lofty rhetoric about expanding democracy and defending freedom filled the halls of elite power and dominated mainstream media coverage of American politics. Blood in the Sand offers both an incisive analysis and a confrontational critique of America's recent international pursuits and its dominant political culture. Stephen Eric Bronner challenges the notion that everything changed in the aftermath of 9/11. He shows instead how a criminal act served to legitimize political manipulation and invigorate traditional nationalistic enthusiasms for militarism and imperial expansion. Employing his own experiences in the Middle East, Bronner acknowledges -- but refuses to overstate -- recent progressive developments in the region. He criticizes the neo-conservative penchant for unilateral military aggression and debunks the dubious notion of fostering democracy at gunpoint. While Bronner analyzes authoritarian repression, human rights violations, shrinking civil liberties, and severe socioeconomic inequalities, Blood in the Sand is neither a narrow political diatribe nor a futile exercise in anti-American negativism. The author honors America by condemning the betrayal of the nation's finest ideals by so many of those who, hypocritically or naively, invoke those ideals the most. Bronner sheds new light on those who insist on publicly waving the flag while privately subverting that for which it stands. Blood in the Sand sounds a clarion call for revitalizing the American polity and reshaping foreign policy along democratic lines. Committed to a political renewal, Bronner urges the American people to recall what is best about their national heritage and the genuine beacon of hope it might offer other countries and other cultures.
Short Annotation
Blood in the Sand is Stephen Eric Bronner's powerful critique of the current state of American foreign and domestic policy, ranging from the government's initial response to 9/11 and the assault on Afghanistan through the Iraqi War and the ramifications of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Unpaid Annotation
Blood in the Sand is Stephen Eric Bronner's powerful critique of the current state of American foreign and domestic policy, ranging from the government's initial response to 9/11 and the assault on Afghanistan through the Iraqi War and the ramifications of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Bronner, who just months before the war began spent time in Iraq as part of a peace delegation, examines the state of twenty-first century America, a nation in which security against future terrorist attacks has become an obsession, "moral values" have turned into a slogan, and belief in the right to engage in a preemptive strike has come to define foreign policy. In Blood in the Sand, Bronner develops a bold new framework for a modern democratic foreign policy. In doing so, he passionately warns of the consequences of failure to alter the current course of events in America: extreme economic inequalities of power, political authoritarianism, imperialist ambitions, and an increasingly constrained cultural climate.
Table of Contents
Introduction : the legacy of 9/11 - chronicles of a dark timep. 1
Gandhi's voice : nonviolence and the violence of our timesp. 15
Us and them : reflections on Afghanistan, terrorism, and the axis of evilp. 26
Baghdad memoriesp. 38
American landscape : lies, fears, and the distortion of democracyp. 49
States of despair : history, politics, and the struggle for Palestinep. 60
Anatomy of a disaster : class war, Iraq, and the contours of American foreign policyp. 82
Dub'ya's fellow travelers : left intellectuals and Mr. Bush's warp. 102
Constructing neoconservatismp. 119
It happened here : the Bush sweep, the left, and the American futurep. 140
Epilogue : democracy, foreign policy, and warp. 160
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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