Catalogue


Wormwood forest : a natural history of Chernobyl /
Mary Mycio.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Joseph Henry Press, c2005.
description
xii, 259 p.
ISBN
0309094305 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Joseph Henry Press, c2005.
isbn
0309094305 (cloth)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
5561670
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2005-09-15:
Chernobyl, dubbed the "zone of alienation," evokes images of a vast nuclear wasteland. After spending ten years traveling its periphery, Ukrainian American Mycio, a former Kiev correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, presents a starkly different view. With Ukrainian botanists and an eclectic variety of Chernobyl scientists as her guides and the help of a dosimeter measuring radioactivity levels, Mycio recounts her observations of wildlife and flora. Not only are local residents still living there, but the area surrounding Chernobyl has also become Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary, teeming with large animals such as moose, elk, wolves, and 270 bird species (including the rare black stork)-all with no evidence of animal mutations from the radioactivity. In many areas, the native flora have reclaimed much of the cultivated land, with an abundance of the plant wormwood, hence the book's title. In conjunction with the photographs found in Robert Polidori's Zones of Exclusion: Pripyat and Chernobyl, one can see the growth of vegetation in the countryside surrounding the zone. A fascinating look at an isolated area that few will ever visit; recommended for academic and public library natural history collections.-Eva Lautemann, Georgia Perimeter Coll. Lib., Clarkston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2005-07-11:
Mycio takes us on a timely tour of the eerie, surprisingly vigorous area around the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that's too radioactive for safe human habitation, yet where, 20 years after the explosion, flora and fauna are "thriving." Among abandoned towns, thousands of cormorants nest, and Przewalskis, a breed of wild horse, live seemingly unharmed on irradiated grass. A few people remain: workers decommissioning the plant, bureaucrats and scientists struggling with chronic underfunding, and samosels, elderly squatters so homesick that Ukraine finally let them stay. Mycio, former Kiev correspondent for the L.A. Times, is a good guide, clearly conveying the niceties of radionuclides; the elaborate, jerry-built structures containing the worst of the radiation; and the impossibility of cleaning the place up. She finds occasional humor and plenty of astonishment, as when a herd of red deer cross her path: "My recorder preserved my inarticulate reaction: `Super. Wow. My God, they're beautiful!' " Mycio gives plenty of fuel for the discussion of nuclear power as an alternative to fossil fuel. Not all readers will share her cautious optimism, yet her verdict, that Chernobyl is not simply a disaster but a terrible paradox, is convincing. B&w photos, map. Agent, Andrea Pedolsky. (Sept. 6) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2006-04-01:
This book anticipates the upcoming 20th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster. Mycio is Ukrainian American, a resident of Kiev for more than a decade, and a journalist with biology and law degrees. This is a well-written account of her several trips into "The Zone of Alienation" in both Ukraine and Belarus. Far from a lifeless wasteland, the zone is poorly populated by humans but it is a virtual wildlife refuge that includes several species locally exterminated a century ago. Mycio describes the effects on the soil, plant life, animals, water and water systems, and humans, both in and out of the zone. The book is also a discussion of risk, because apparently healthy living outside radiation limits seems entirely possible. The author even promotes the intelligent use of nuclear power to reduce the use of carbon-based fuels. Discussions of radiation may be confusing due to a plethora of units. The basic physics may be somewhat inadequate, but the science is good overall. The book has only one (inadequate) map and needs far more. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and up. R. E. Buntrock formerly, University of Maine
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Today Pripyat is a radioactive ghost town that will be abandoned for thousands of years."
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, July 2005
Library Journal, September 2005
Choice, April 2006
Boston Globe, May 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 1986, when the Chernobyl nuclear reactor melted down, 135,000 people were evacuated. However, 20 years on, pockets of defiant local residents survive there and the area has become Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary. Mary Mycio explores the world's only radioactive wilderness.
Description for Bookstore
When a titanic explosion ripped through the Number Four reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant in 1986, spewing flames and chunks of burning, radioactive material into the atmosphere, one of our worst nightmares came true. As the news gradually seeped out of the USSR and the extent of the disaster was realized, it became clear how horribly wrong things had gone. Dozens died--two from the explosion and many more from radiation illness during the following months--while scores of additional victims came down with acute radiation sickness. Hundreds of thousands were evacuated from the most contaminated areas. The prognosis for Chernobyl and its environs--succinctly dubbed the Zone of Alienation--was grim. Today, 20 years after the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, intrepid journalist Mary Mycio dons dosimeter and camouflage protective gear to explore the world's most infamous radioactive wilderness. As she tours the Zone to report on the disaster's long-term effects on its human, faunal, and floral inhabitants, she meets pockets of defiant local residents who have remained behind to survive and make a life in the Zone. And she is shocked to discover that the area surrounding Chernobyl has become Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary, a flourishing--at times unearthly--wilderness teeming with large animals and a variety of birds, many of them members of rare and endangered species. Like the forests, fields, and swamps of their unexpectedly inviting habitat, both the people and the animals are all radioactive. Cesium-137 is packed in their muscles and strontium-90 in their bones. But quite astonishingly, they are also thriving. If fears of the Apocalypse and a lifeless, barren radioactive future have been constant companions of the nuclear age, Chernobyl now shows us a different view of the future. A vivid blend of reportage, popular science, and illuminating encounters that explode the myths of Chernobyl with facts that are at once beautiful and horrible, Wormwood Forestbrings a remarkable land--and its people and animals--to life to tell a unique story of science, surprise and suspense.
Long Description
When a titanic explosion ripped through the Number Four reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant in 1986, spewing flames and chunks of burning, radioactive material into the atmosphere, one of our worst nightmares came true. As the news gradually seeped out of the USSR and the extent of the disaster was realized, it became clear how horribly wrong things had gone. Dozens died--two from the explosion and many more from radiation illness during the following months--while scores of additional victims came down with acute radiation sickness. Hundreds of thousands were evacuated from the most contaminated areas. The prognosis for Chernobyl and its environs--succinctly dubbed the Zone of Alienation--was grim. Today, 20 years after the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, intrepid journalist Mary Mycio dons dosimeter and camouflage protective gear to explore the world's most infamous radioactive wilderness. As she tours the Zone to report on the disaster's long-term effects on its human, faunal, and floral inhabitants, she meets pockets of defiant local residents who have remained behind to survive and make a life in the Zone. And she is shocked to discover that the area surrounding Chernobyl has become Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary, a flourishing--at times unearthly--wilderness teeming with large animals and a variety of birds, many of them members of rare and endangered species. Like the forests, fields, and swamps of their unexpectedly inviting habitat, both the people and the animals are all radioactive. Cesium-137 is packed in their muscles and strontium-90 in their bones. But quite astonishingly, they are also thriving. If fears of the Apocalypse and a lifeless, barren radioactive future have been constant companions of the nuclear age, Chernobyl now shows us a different view of the future. A vivid blend of reportage, popular science, and illuminating encounters that explode the myths of Chernobyl with facts that are at once beautiful and horrible, Wormwood Forest brings a remarkable land--and its people and animals--to life to tell a unique story of science, surprise and suspense.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Wormwoodp. 1
Four Seasonsp. 35
Birding in Belarusp. 67
Nuclear Sanctuaryp. 99
Back to the Wildp. 127
Wormwood Watersp. 153
Homo chernobylusp. 183
The Nature of the Beastp. 217
Acknowledgmentsp. 243
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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