Catalogue


A hill among a thousand : transformations and ruptures in rural Rwanda /
Danielle de Lame.
imprint
Madison : University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.
description
xix, 540 p..
ISBN
0299215601 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison : University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.
isbn
0299215601 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5496261
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-10-01:
Affiliated with the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Belgium, the author conducted fieldwork in Rwanda for 18 months between 1988 and 1990. De Lame explains that this rather lengthy descriptive study, originally a French doctoral dissertation, is not aimed at contributing to anthropological theory, but to unraveling life among the scattered homesteads living on the "Hill." The peasants viewed themselves as a social entity, a product of the recent hostilities as well as the effects of rural development schemes. The book is divided into three major sections: "Introducing Rwanda and Its Study," "Social Ties, or Living Space and Time," and "Ritualized Exchanges: Performing the Interplay of Changing Social Relations." With most of the book written, de Lame returned to Rwanda in 1996 to the refugee camps in south Kivu. These observations are contained in the epilogue, "2004. Ten years after the massacres and genocide, what more is there to say." ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. B. M. du Toit emeritus, University of Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
"De Lame's familiarity with Rwandan historiography is unparalleled. As a field researcher, she spent long periods in Rwanda and used her time well. The result: an ethnography that gives full recognition to the complexities of a field too often treated in reductionist terms." --David Newbury, Smith College
"The most outstanding contribution to the anthropology of Rwanda during the 1980s and 1990s. Danielle de Lame's A Hill among a Thousand weaves observation and theoretical analysis into a seamless whole."Jan Vansina, author of Antecedents of Modern Rwanda: The Nyiginya Kingdom
"The most outstanding contribution to the anthropology of Rwanda during the 1980s and 1990s. Danielle de Lame's A Hill among a Thousandweaves observation and theoretical analysis into a seamless whole."Jan Vansina, author of Antecedents of Modern Rwanda: The Nyiginya Kingdom
"The most outstanding contribution to the anthropology of Rwanda during the 1980s and 1990s. Danielle de Lame'sA Hill among a Thousandweaves observation and theoretical analysis into a seamless whole."--Jan Vansina, author ofAntecedents of Modern Rwanda: The Nyiginya Kingdom
"An outstanding accomplishment. . . . The book sets a high standard for how to write about the social world of Africa."-Tony Waters, International Journal of African Historical Studies
"An outstanding accomplishment. . . . The book sets a high standard for how to write about the social world of Africa."-Tony Waters,International Journal of African Historical Studies
"De Lame's familiarity with Rwandan historiography is unparalleled. As a field researcher, she spent long periods in Rwanda and used her time well. The result: an ethnography that gives full recognition to the complexities of a field too often treated in reductionist terms." David Newbury, Smith College
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2006
Choice, October 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Sometimes called "the land of a thousand hills," Rwanda has witnessed upheavals of massive proportions. Looking at the people of one hill community, Danielle de Lame shows how they coped with unprecedented change during the twilight years of Rwanda's Second Republic. In an insightful, meticulously researched study focusing on the late 1980s and early 1990s, de Lame situates this rural community, located at the heart of the Kibuye prefecture, within the larger context of Rwandan history and society. In this country without villages, it is the networks of kinship, administration, and commerce that create complex patterns of solidarity and dependency. De Lame reveals these patterns in all their intricacy, and her treatment of the region and its rhythms speaks at the same time to the economics of production, the inequalities of power, and the dynamics of social transformation. The ultimate goal of her work is to restore the individuality of the people she studies, "making them neither executioners nor victims but men and women fashioning their own destiny, day after day." Copublished with the Royal Museum for Central Africa Wisconsin edition not for sale in Europe.
Table of Contents
Introducing Rwanda and its studyp. 1
From the "enigmatic kingdom" to the second republic : on landscapes and menp. 42
Social ties, or living space and timep. 107
The hill : living memory and rhythmsp. 114
Living time, lives of todayp. 168
Reappropriating the impersonalp. 244
Ritualized exchanges : performing the interplay of changing social relationsp. 303
Bottled beer and hoe's milkp. 306
The cows of freedomp. 341
Women, like rain?p. 385
Epilogue : of honey and blood : the wealth and violence of power and consensusp. 459
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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