Catalogue


The empire strikes back? : the impact of imperialism on Britain from the mid-nineteenth century /
Andrew Thompson.
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2005.
description
xvii, 374 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0582438292 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2005.
isbn
0582438292 (pbk.)
catalogue key
5493105
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [350]-361) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Thompson is Senior Lecturer in Modern British History, and Pro-Dean for Learning and Teaching in the Arts Faculty, at the University of Leeds.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-07-01:
Students of British imperialism and modern British history alike will welcome this book. Rather than focusing on how the British Empire's rise and decline impacted the rest of the world, Thompson (Univ. of Leeds) explores how imperialism affected, and did not affect, the people of Britain at home from the mid-19th through the 20th centuries. In doing so, he provides a concise but thorough overview of the latest research and debates on the subject. Chapters cover the various social classes, women and children, politics, the economy, national identity, and the end of empire. In each chapter, Thompson clearly outlines the arguments of a wide variety of scholars and carefully analyzes the merits of the logic and evidence used for each. At the same time, he provides new insights from his own original research. The result is a useful, readable, and thought-provoking overview of an important subject that has not previously received such comprehensive attention. With an extensive bibliography and notes, this is a good starting point for anyone wishing to explore the topic further. Summing Up: Highly recommended. L. B. Williams Central Connecticut State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This wide-ranging and ambitious work begins from, but moves well beyond, the common observation that empire had a significant role in the making of modern Britain. Thompson weighs the relevant evidence from elites to the working classes, from women and children to international economics and domestic politics. In so doing he treats an enormous body of material with judicious insight. This book helps to bridge all-too divided hemispheres of the historical mind. It deserves close attention by specialist scholars as well as a prominent place on student reading lists.' Saul Dubow, Sussex University ''This is a fine piece of work: perhaps the best book so far in its field. It will surely be seen as an essential undergraduate text in many British and Imperial History courses, and in some sub-fields of Politics, Sociology and Cultural Studies too.'' Stephen Howe
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This wide-ranging and ambitious work begins from, but moves well beyond, the common observation that empire had a significant role in the making of modern Britain . Thompson weighs the relevant evidence from elites to the working classes, from women and children to international economics and domestic politics. In so doing he treats an enormous body of material with judicious insight ... It deserves close attention by specialist scholars as well as a prominent place on student reading lists. Saul Dubow, University of Sussex The concept of empire and its influence seems to be everywhere today, debated widely both in the media and academe. How did the British people regard their empire? Was it seen as a source of strength or weakness? How far did the imperial experience define British nationhood? And why are imperial legacies still debated so vigorously? The Empire Strikes Back? is the first full length study of the influence of empire on British society, past and present. In this path-breaking book, Thompson examines the impact of empire on Britain s political culture, social development and economic performance. He shows how the effects of overseas expansion on Britain were complex and even contradictory. There was not, and never could be, any single or monolithic response to imperialism. Rather, the empire markedly extended the boundaries of British domestic society, and its meaning was contested by different social groups. The book concludes by examining the British people s relation to empire in recent times, engaging with many contemporary issues, such as the Falklands conflict, the repatriation of Hong Kong, and the impact of immigration. A fascinating study for all those concerned with how the past shapes both the present and the future, this book is essential reading for students and scholars alike. Andrew Thompson is Senior Lecturer in Modern British History, and Pro-Dean for Learning and Teaching in the Arts Faculty, at the University of Leeds. His previous publications include Imperial Britain : The Empire in British Politics 1880 1932 (2000) and The Impact of the South African War, 1899 1902 (2002) , co-edited with David Omissi.
Back Cover Copy
This wide-ranging and ambitious work begins from, but moves well beyond, the common observation that empire had a significant role in the making of modern Britain . Thompson weighs the relevant evidence from elites to the working classes, from women and children to international economics and domestic politics. In so doing he treats an enormous body of material with judicious insight ... It deserves close attention by specialist scholars as well as a prominent place on student reading lists. Saul Dubow, University of Sussex The concept of empire and its influence seems to be everywhere today, debated widely both in the media and academe. How did the British people regard their empire? Was it seen as a source of strength or weakness? How far did the imperial experience define British nationhood? And why are imperial legacies still debated so vigorously? The Empire Strikes Back? is the first full length study of the influence of empire on British society, past and present. In this path-breaking book, Thompson examines the impact of empire on Britain's political culture, social development and economic performance. He shows how the effects of overseas expansion on Britain were complex and even contradictory. There was not, and never could be, any single or monolithic response to imperialism. Rather, the empire markedly extended the boundaries of British domestic society, and its meaning was contested by different social groups. The book concludes by examining the British people's relation to empire in recent times, engaging with many contemporary issues, such as the Falklands conflict, the repatriation of Hong Kong, and the impact of immigration. A fascinating study for all those concerned with how the past shapes both the present and the future, this book is essential reading for students and scholars alike. Andrew Thompson is Senior Lecturer in Modern British History, and Pro-Dean for Learning and Teaching in the Arts Faculty, at the University of Leeds. His previous publications include Imperial Britain : The Empire in British Politics 18801932 (2000) and The Impact of the South African War, 18991902 (2002), co-edited with David Omissi.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Why does Britain still seem so attached to the days of empire? Andrew Thompson explores the part played by Empire in shaping British society, past & present.
Long Description
The Empire Strikes Back' will inject the empire back into the domestic history of modern Britain. In the nineteenth century and for much of the twentieth century, Britain's empire was so large that it was truly the global superpower. Much of Africa, Asia and America had been subsumed. Britannia's tentacles had stretched both wide and deep. Culture, Religion, Health, Sexuality, Law and Order were all impacted in the dominated countries. The Empire Strikes Back' shows how the dependent states were subsumed and then hit back, affecting in turn England itself.
Main Description
From global superpower to British state. This highly topical book looks at how the British Empire's tentacles stretched far and wide from the African and Asian contintents to the Americas, and how these dependent states hit back, affecting in turn England itself. Empire is highly topical: release of Hong Kong, civil wars in Africa, troubled legacy of Indian independence The various series on Empire, Jewel in the Crown, Rhodes and film have branded a strong general interest in England's glorious global past (as oppose to rather ignmon. present).
Main Description
'The Empire Strikes Back' will inject the empire back into the domestic history of modern Britain. In the nineteenth century and for much of the twentieth century, Britain's empire was so large that it was truly the global superpower. Much of Africa, Asia and America had been subsumed. Britannia's tentacles had stretched both wide and deep. Culture, Religion, Health, Sexuality, Law and Order were all impacted in the dominated countries. 'The Empire Strikes Back' shows how the dependent states were subsumed and then hit back, affecting in turn England itself.
Main Description
This wide-ranging and ambitious work begins from, but moves well beyond, the common observation that empire had a significant role in the making of modern Britain. Thompson weighs the relevant evidence from elites to the working classes, from women and children to international economics and domestic politics. In so doing he treats an enormous body of material with judicious insight ... It deserves close attention by specialist scholars as well as a prominent place on student reading lists. Saul Dubow, Universityof Sussex The concept of empire and its influence seems to be everywhere today, debated widely both in the media and academe. How did the British people regard their empire? Was it seen as a source of strength or weakness? How far did the imperial experience define British nationhood? And why are imperial legacies still debated so vigorously? The Empire Strikes Back? is the first full length study of the influence of empire on British society, past and present. In this path-breaking book, Thompson examines the impact of empire on Britain's political culture, social development and economic performance. He shows how the effects of overseas expansion on Britain were complex and even contradictory. There was not, and never could be, any single or monolithic response to imperialism. Rather, the empire markedly extended the boundaries of British domestic society, and its meaning was contested by different social groups. The book concludes by examining the British people's relation to empire in recent times, engaging with many contemporary issues, such as the Falklands conflict, the repatriation of Hong Kong, and the impact of immigration. A fascinating study for all those concerned with how the past shapes both the present and the future, this book is essential reading for students and scholars alike. Andrew Thompson is Senior Lecturer in Modern British History, and Pro-Dean for Learning and Teaching in the Arts Faculty, at the University of Leeds. His previous publications include Imperial Britain: The Empire in British Politics 18801932 (2000) and The Impact of the South African War, 18991902 (2002), co-edited with David Omissi.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. viii
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. x
Publisher's Acknowledgementsp. xii
Prefacep. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xvi
Introductionp. 1
Elitesp. 9
The Lower Middle Class and the Working Class at Homep. 38
The Working Class at Workp. 64
The Working Class at Playp. 83
Women and Childrenp. 96
Domestic Politicsp. 124
Metropolitan Economicsp. 155
The Forging of British Identitiesp. 179
After-Effectsp. 203
Afterwordp. 239
Appendixp. 245
Notesp. 248
Select Bibliographyp. 350
Indexp. 362
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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