Catalogue


White Creole culture, politics and identity during the age of abolition /
David Lambert.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
description
viii, 245 p. : ill., facsims., maps. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521841313 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
isbn
0521841313 (hbk.)
catalogue key
5493102
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-234) and index.
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-02-01:
In this dense, carefully argued study, Lambert (Univ. of London) reopens the topic of the position of whites and freemen in colonial West Indian societies, an issue that fascinated historians a generation ago. Building on the earlier work of Handler, Cohen, Greene, Sheppard, and Beckles, among others, Lambert advances the subject by applying a modernist and geographical perspective to the question of articulation of identities. In doing so, he is able to point to inconsistencies of white Creole identification in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, when abolitionist sentiment in England flourished. Threatened by metropolitan demands for amelioration of slave conditions, Barbadian planters, as well as poorer whites, questioned one of the bedrock premises of their identity, i.e., colonial loyalty to imperial authority. Additionally, Lambert suggests that a belief in white supremacy (in which planters dominated not only their slaves, but also the poorer whites), a planter ideal ("the good, paternalistic master"), and colonial opposition (especially to Methodists and anyone espousing abolition) informed white Creole identity. These conflicting "discourses" created identity crises as abolition approached and continued through the postslavery apprenticeship period and beyond. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. M. Delson American Museum of Natural History
Reviews
Review Quotes
Review of the hardback: 'Lambert is the first writer since Edward Braithwaite to examine in depth how whites in the Caribbean developed an embryonic white Creole ... The major virtue of Lambert's sensitive delineations of white identities is that it will force historians to pay more attention to divisions within the master class and to how whiteness, and by implication blackness, were contested discourses with significant political implications.' English Historical Review
Review of the hardback: '... theoretically stimulating and empirically rich.' H-HistGeog
Review of the hardback: 'White Creole Culture is an exemplary cultural history, with its in-depth exploration of individuals and moments, its interdisciplinary range, its utilisation of a range of texts from court cases and poetry to rebel flags and the colonial press, and its eloquent account of the conjunctural formation of white colonial identities across metropole and colony.' Journal of Historical Geography
'... theoretically stimulating and empirically rich.'
'... theoretically stimulating and empirically rich.' H-HistGeog
''¦ theoretically stimulating and empirically rich.' H-HistGeog
'White Creole Culture is an exemplary cultural history, with its in-depth exploration of individuals and moments, its interdisciplinary range, its utilisation of a range of texts from court cases and poetry to rebel flags and the colonial press, and its eloquent account of the conjunctural formation of white colonial identities across metropole and colony.'
'Lambert is the first writer since Edward Braithwaite to examine in depth how whites in the Caribbean developed an embryonic white Creole ... The major virtue of Lambert's sensitive delineations of white identities is that it will force historians to pay more attention to divisions within the master class and to how whiteness, and by implication blackness, were contested discourses with significant political implications.'
"Its sophistication...lends insight to those interested in the cultural politics of identity construction that found articulation in four primary discourses: white supremacism, the planter ideal, colonial loyalty, and colonial opposition (p. 208). It is also helpful for those readers interested in the application of postcolonial theory to an ample assortment of primary sources within the contexts of regional and transnational studies of the West Indies. In the end, Lambert has made an important contribution to the understanding of "the geographical 'problem of slavery,'" a topic that David Brion Davis so eloquently introduced to so many historians and that Lambert has continued to develop even further (p. 10)." - Michael Pasquier, Department of Religion, Florida State University, H-NET
'White Creole Culture is an exemplary cultural history, with its in-depth exploration of individuals and moments, its interdisciplinary range, its utilisation of a range of texts from court cases and poetry to rebel flags and the colonial press, and its eloquent account of the conjunctural formation of white colonial identities across metropole and colony.' Journal of Historical Geography
'Lambert is the first writer since Edward Braithwaite to examine in depth how whites in the Caribbean developed an embryonic white Creole ... The major virtue of Lambert's sensitive delineations of white identities is that it will force historians to pay more attention to divisions within the master class and to how whiteness, and by implication blackness, were contested discourses with significant political implications.' English Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2006
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Summaries
Main Description
David Lambert explores the political and cultural articulation of white creole identity in the British Caribbean colony of Barbados during the age of abolitionism (c.1780-1833), the period in which the British antislavery movement emerged, first to attack the slave trade and then the institution of chattel slavery itself. Supporters of slavery in Barbados and beyond responded with their own campaigning, resulting in a series of debates and moments of controversy, both localised and transatlantic in significance. They exposed tensions between Britain and its West Indian colonies, and raised questions about whether white slaveholders could be classed as fully 'British' and if slavery was compatible with 'English' conceptions of liberty and morality. David Lambert considers what it meant to be a white colonial subject in a place viewed as a vital and loyal part of the empire but subject to increasing metropolitan attack because of the existence of slavery.
Description for Bookstore
This book considers what it meant to be a white Briton in the West Indian colony of Barbados during the age of abolitionism. David Lambert offers a unique perspective into the consequences of these tumultuous times for a colony once renowned as the most loyal in the British Empire.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Acknowledgements
Introduction: white Creole culture, politics and identity
The geographical 'problem of slavery'
Joshua Steele and the 'improvement' of slavery
Making a 'well constituted society' - the ambitions and limits of white unity
Locating blame for the 1816 Rebellion
Methodist persecution and the uncertain place of Barbados
'Days of misery and nights of fear' - white ideas of freedom at the end of slavery
Epilogue
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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