Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

"War governor of the South" : North Carolina's Zeb Vance in the Confederacy /
Joe A. Mobley ; foreword by John David Smith.
imprint
Gainsville : University Press of Florida, 2005.
description
xiv, 264 p.
ISBN
0813028493 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainsville : University Press of Florida, 2005.
isbn
0813028493 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
5488389
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joe A. Mobley is editor of the Letter Press documentary series The Papers of Zebulon Baird Vance, former editor in chief of the North Carolina Historical Review, and the author of several books for the North Carolina Office of Archives and History
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-03-01:
One reason often forwarded for Confederate defeat is the doctrine of States' Rights, and a name linked with that theory is Zebulon Vance. Mobley (editor, The Papers of Zebulon Baird Vance, 1963-95) strongly refutes this accusation in his well-written and researched work. The author concludes that once secession occurred, the Tar Heel governor threw his support behind the Confederacy and Jefferson Davis and remained loyal. Although Vance often quarreled with Confederate officials on issues ranging from impressment and the draft to blockade running and railroad gauges, in the end, he almost always acceded to the wishes of the Richmond government. As a firm believer in white supremacy, Vance recognized that only Southern independence could preserve the South's peculiar institution. Nonetheless, one cannot escape the conclusion that had Vance been less concerned about personal and state prerogatives, Davis's task would have certainly been easier, if ultimately not more successful. Although less critical of Vance's wartime activities than Gordon McKinney's recent Zeb Vance: North Carolina's Civil War Governor and Gilded Age Political Leader (CH, May'05, 42-5475), this book is an excellent companion to that volume. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Should be purchased by libraries with collections on Southern history. D. Butts Gordon College (GA)
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Zebulon B. Vance, governor of North Carolina during the devastating years of the Civil War. He has been portrayed as a loyal Confederate, viciously characterized as one of the principal causes of the Confederate defeat, and called 'the Lincoln of the South.
Description for Bookstore
"This thoughtful, deeply researched book definitively demonstrates that Zeb Vance was committed to southern independence and protection of civil liberties. His disagreements with the Davis administration allowed him to placate the dissidents in North Carolina while reflecting his main concern about the accretion of power by the Confederate government."-Max R. Williams, professor emeritus of history, Western Carolina University Zebulon B. Vance, governor of North Carolina during the devastating years of the Civil War, has long sparked controversy and spirited political comment among scholars. He has been portrayed as a loyal Confederate, viciously characterized as one of the principal causes of the Confederate defeat, and called "the Lincoln of the South." Joe A. Mobley clarifies the nature of Vance's leadership, focusing on the young governor's commitment to Southern independence, military and administrative decisions, and personality clashes with President Jefferson Davis. As a confirmed Unionist before the outbreak of the war, Vance endorsed secession reluctantly. Elected governor in 1862, Vance managed to hold together the state, which was divided over support for the war and for a central government in Richmond. Mobley reveals him as a man conflicted by his prewar Unionist beliefs and the necessity to lead the North Carolina war effort while contending with widespread fears created by Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and such issues as the role of women in the war, lawlessness and desertion among the troops, the importance of the state's blockade-runners, and the arrival of Sherman's troops. While the governor's temperament and sensitivity to any perceived slight to him or his state made negotiations between Raleigh and Richmond difficult, Mobley shows that in the end Vance fully supported the attempt to achieve southern independence.
Description for Bookstore
“This thoughtful, deeply researched book definitively demonstrates that Zeb Vance was committed to southern independence and protection of civil liberties. His disagreements with the Davis administration allowed him to placate the dissidents in North Carolina while reflecting his main concern about the accretion of power by the Confederate government.”-Max R. Williams, professor emeritus of history, Western Carolina University Zebulon B. Vance, governor of North Carolina during the devastating years of the Civil War, has long sparked controversy and spirited political comment among scholars. He has been portrayed as a loyal Confederate, viciously characterized as one of the principal causes of the Confederate defeat, and called “the Lincoln of the South.” Joe A. Mobley clarifies the nature of Vance’s leadership, focusing on the young governor’s commitment to Southern independence, military and administrative decisions, and personality clashes with President Jefferson Davis. As a confirmed Unionist before the outbreak of the war, Vance endorsed secession reluctantly. Elected governor in 1862, Vance managed to hold together the state, which was divided over support for the war and for a central government in Richmond. Mobley reveals him as a man conflicted by his prewar Unionist beliefs and the necessity to lead the North Carolina war effort while contending with widespread fears created by Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and such issues as the role of women in the war, lawlessness and desertion among the troops, the importance of the state’s blockade-runners, and the arrival of Sherman’s troops. While the governor’s temperament and sensitivity to any perceived slight to him or his state made negotiations between Raleigh and Richmond difficult, Mobley shows that in the end Vance fully supported the attempt to achieve southern independence.
Main Description
Zebulon B. Vance, governor of North Carolina during the devastating years of the Civil War, has long sparked controversy and spirited political comment among scholars. He has been portrayed as a loyal Confederate, viciously characterized as one of the principal causes of the Confederate defeat, and called "the Lincoln of the South." Joe A. Mobley clarifies the nature of Vance's leadership, focusing on the young governor's commitment to Southern independence, military and administrative decisions, and personality clashes with President Jefferson Davis. As a confirmed Unionist before the outbreak of the war, Vance endorsed secession reluctantly. Elected governor in 1862, Vance managed to hold together the state, which was divided over support for the war and for a central government in Richmond. Mobley reveals him as a man conflicted by his prewar Unionist beliefs and the necessity to lead the North Carolina war effort while contending with widespread fears created by Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and such issues as the role of women in the war, lawlessness and desertion among the troops, the importance of the state's blockade-runners, and the arrival of Sherman's troops. While the governor's temperament and sensitivity to any perceived slight to him or his state made negotiations between Raleigh and Richmond difficult, Mobley shows that in the end Vance fully supported the attempt to achieve southern independence.
Main Description
Zebulon B. Vance, governor of North Carolina during the devastating years of the Civil War, has long sparked controversy and spirited political comment among scholars. He has been portrayed as a loyal Confederate, viciously characterized as one of the principal causes of the Confederate defeat, and called “the Lincoln of the South.” Joe A. Mobley clarifies the nature of Vance’s leadership, focusing on the young governor’s commitment to Southern independence, military and administrative decisions, and personality clashes with President Jefferson Davis. As a confirmed Unionist before the outbreak of the war, Vance endorsed secession reluctantly. Elected governor in 1862, Vance managed to hold together the state, which was divided over support for the war and for a central government in Richmond. Mobley reveals him as a man conflicted by his prewar Unionist beliefs and the necessity to lead the North Carolina war effort while contending with widespread fears created by Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and such issues as the role of women in the war, lawlessness and desertion among the troops, the importance of the state’s blockade-runners, and the arrival of Sherman’s troops. While the governor’s temperament and sensitivity to any perceived slight to him or his state made negotiations between Raleigh and Richmond difficult, Mobley shows that in the end Vance fully supported the attempt to achieve southern independence.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
"My Hand Fell Slowly and Sadly by the Side of a Secessionist"p. 13
"Let Every Patriot in the Land Assist"p. 36
"Humanity Shudders at What May Take Place"p. 76
"To Their Hands I Am Content to Leave It"p. 99
"My Life Popularity and Everything Shall Go into This Contest"p. 113
"Through a Most Rigorous and Dangerous Blockade"p. 127
"Women Has Nerved the Arm of the Stalwart Soldier"p. 148
"I Am Not Out of Heart"p. 168
"All Hell Can't Make Me Do It"p. 194
Epilogue: "To the Last Gasp with Truth and Loyalty"p. 214
Notesp. 223
Bibliographyp. 249
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem