Catalogue


A common hunger : land rights in Canada and South Africa /
Joan G. Fairweather.
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2006.
description
xxi, 260 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1552381927 (pbk.), 9781552381922
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2006.
isbn
1552381927 (pbk.)
9781552381922
catalogue key
5486080
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-245) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-06-01:
The abuses against justice and human dignity suffered by indigenous populations in Canada and South Africa are highlighted by their loss of rights to land, as is remarkably well chronicled and documented here. Archivist Fairweather has done an incredibly thorough job of describing and analyzing how the European myth of "empty lands" was used to justify an incredible variety of abuses (some of which still persist) against populations that were treated not only as less than equal but, in many respects, less than human. Without even hinting at ideas of genocide, Fairweather does a remarkable job recounting in intelligible detail the many ways--culturally, socially, politically, and economically--in which European expansion hurt native populations in both countries from the earliest contacts, and how even recent administrative and judicial attempts to redress those hurts are still falling short. This is not a diatribe against colonialism; in fact, there is almost no polemic in it. But sensitive readers cannot help but be struck by the many parallels that recurred over more than three centuries in the dynamics of interethnic relations even in such vastly different settings. For anyone who cares about minority rights anywhere, and especially anyone who wants to better understand the history of Canada and/or South Africa. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. D. B. Heath Brown University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
Geographically, demographically, and politically, South Africa and Canada are two countries that are very far apart. What they have in common are indigenous populations, which, because of their historical and ongoing experience of colonization and dispossession, share a hunger for land and human dignity. Based on extensive research carried out in both countries, A Common Hunger is a comparative work on the history of indigenous land rights in Canada and post-apartheid South Africa. Author Joan Fairweather has constructed a balanced examination of the impact of land dispossession on the lives of indigenous peoples in both countries and their response to centuries of European domination. By reclaiming rights to the land and an equitable share in the wealth-producing resources they contain, the first peoples of Canada and South Africa are taking important steps to confront the legacies of poverty that characterize many of their communities. A Common Hunger provides historical context to the current land claim process in these two former British colonies and examines the efforts of governments and the courts to ensure that justice is done.
Main Description
The impact of colonial dispossession & the subsequent social & political ramifications places a unique burden on governments having to establish equitable means of addressing previous injustices. This book considers the efforts by both Canada & South Africa to reconcile the damage left by colonial expansion, in part, looking back with a critical eye, but also pointing the way towards a solution that will satisfy the common need for human dignity.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text considers the effects by both Canada and South Africa to reconcile the damage left by colonial expansion, in part, looking back with a critical eye, but also pointing the way towards a solution that will satisfy the common need for human dignity.
Main Description
Geographically, demographically, and politically, South Africa and Canada are two countries that are very far apart. What they have in common are indigenous populations, which, because of their historical and ongoing experience of colonization and dispossession, share a hunger for land and human dignity. Based on extensive research carried out in both countries, A Common Hunger is a comparative work on the history of indigenous land rights in Canada and post-apartheid South Africa. Joan Fairweather has constructed a balanced examination of the impact of land dispossession on the lives of indigenous peoples in both countries and their response to centuries of European domination. By reclaiming rights to the land and an equitable share in the wealth-producing resources they contain, the first peoples of Canada and South Africa are taking important steps to confront the legacies of poverty that characterize many of their communities. A Common Hunger provides historical context to the current land claim process in these two former British colonies and examines the efforts of governments and the courts to ensure that justice is done.
Main Description
The impact of colonial dispossession and the subsequent social and political ramifications place a unique burden on governments having to establish equitable means of addressing previous injustices. A Common Hunger considers the efforts by both of these countries to reconcile the damage left by colonial oppression, in part, looking back with a critical eye, but also pointing the way toward a solution that will satisfy the common need for human dignity.
Main Description
Geographically, demographically, and politically, South Africa and Canada are two countries that are very far apart. What they have in common are indigenous populations, which, because of their historical and ongoing experience of colonisation and dispossession, share a hunger for land and human dignity. Based on extensive research carried out in both countries, A Common Hunger is a comparative work on the history of indigenous land rights in Canada and post-apartheid South Africa. Joan Fairweather has constructed a balanced examination of the impact of land dispossession on the lives of indigenous peoples in both countries and their response to centuries of European domination. By reclaiming rights to the land and an equitable share in the wealth-producing resources they contain, the first peoples of Canada and South Africa are taking important steps to confront the legacies of poverty that characterise many of their communities. A Common Hunger provides historical context to the current land claim process in these two former British colonies and examines the efforts of governments and the courts to ensure that justice is done.
Main Description
Geographically, demographically, and politically, South Africa and Canada are two countries that are very far apart. What they have in common are indigenous populations, which, because of their historical and ongoing experience of colonization and dispossession, share a hunger for land and human dignity. Based on extensive research carried out in both countries, "A Common Hunger "is a comparative work on the history of indigenous land rights in Canada and post-apartheid South Africa. Author Joan Fairweather has constructed a balanced examination of the impact of land dispossession on the lives of indigenous peoples in both countries and their response to centuries of European domination. By reclaiming rights to the land and an equitable share in the wealth-producing resources they contain, the first peoples of Canada and South Africa are taking important steps to confront the legacies of poverty that characterize many of their communities. "A Common Hunger" provides historical context to the current land claim process in these two former British colonies and examines the efforts of governments and the courts to ensure that justice is done.
Main Description
The impact of colonial dispossession and the subsequent social and political ramifications places a unique burden on governments having to establish equitable means of addressing previous injustices. This book considers the efforts by both Canada and South Africa to reconcile the damage left by colonial expansion, in part, looking back with a critical eye, but also pointing the way towards a solution that will satisfy the common need for human dignity.
Table of Contents
The land and the people
Land rights and treaties
Sovereignty and segregation
Litigation
Negotiating restitution
Self-government
Restoring dignity
Reconciliation
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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