Catalogue


Translating investments : metaphor and the dynamic of cultural change in Tudor-Stuart England /
Judith H. Anderson.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Fordham University Press, 2005.
description
xi, 324 p.
ISBN
082322421X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Fordham University Press, 2005.
isbn
082322421X
catalogue key
5485234
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Judith H. Anderson is Chancellor's Professor of English at Indiana University, Bloomington
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-01-01:
In a scholarly study that is at once critical and historical, Anderson (Indiana Univ.) explores "the functioning of metaphor in Tudor and early Stuart culture." The author has presented much of this in various forums, but she adds some new material in bringing her work together in one book. Linking diverse disciplines and combining wide scope and micromanagement of topics, she sets up each chapter with a different focus. She is fearless in wrestling with arcane topics such as the Ricoeur-Derrida debates over metaphor, Spenserian allegory, Ciceronian rhetoric, and Gerald de Malynes' ideas on market economies. This results in a collection that will overwhelm uninitiated readers, who will stagger under the dense prose with its long sentences, overabundance of prepositional phrases, and polysyllabic words, but it will delight specialists who will appreciate Anderson's well-documented, detailed research and extensive apparatus. In the end, curious and determined readers will agree that Anderson achieves her aim of exploring the "dynamic of metaphor in cultural history" and how metaphor can "be powerfully and validly constructive." ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections only. J. S. Carducci Winona State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Many insights are presented which throw light on both intellectual and material culture."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric and economics. She shows how history and theory can be mutually enlightening, but touches also upon the present.
Long Description
In this wide-ranging book, Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric, and economics. Invoking a provocative metaphorical concept from Andy Clark's version of cognitive science, she construes metaphor as a form of scaffolding fundamental to human culture. A more traditional or controversial conception of this is ?sublation?Hegel's Aufhebung, or ?raising, ? as the philosophers Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur have understood the term. From beginning to end, this study not only shows how history and theory can be mutually enlightening, but touches also upon the present, engaging questions about language, rhetoric, and reading within poststructuralism and neocognitivism. ?Translating Investments is a remarkable achievement. Its fine-grained discussions of theories of metaphor and translation from antiquity to contemporary philosophies of language and cognition frame a genuinely innovative examination of the early modern cultural syntax through which the figure of ?investment? became the lingua franca of schools of rhetoric, Eucharistic debates, devotional arts, fantasies of erotic violence, and emergent economic theories. Anderson has told an important story, one which enables readers to grasp often misunderstood or ignored links between topics as diverse as the famous Ricoeur-Derrida debates over metaphor, Ciceronian rhetoric, the Vestiarian controversy, Spenserian allegory, and the sacramental language of Gerrald de Malynes'writings on market economies. The book provides startling insights into the suppleness of the mechanisms of cultural change. Rarely has the chiaroscuro of thedominant culture been so acutely portrayed.'?Lowell Gallagher, University of California, Los Angeles
Long Description
The title Translating Investments, a manifold pun, refers to metaphor and clothing, authority and interest, and trading and finance. Translation, Latin translatio, is historically a name for metaphor, and investment, etymologically a reference to clothing, participates both in the complex symbolism of early modern dress and in the cloth trade of the period. In this original and wide-ranging book, Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric, and economics during the reigns of the Tudors and early Stuarts. Invoking a provocative metaphorical concept from Andy Clark's version of cognitive science, she construes metaphor itself as a form of scaffolding fundamental to human culture. A more traditional and controversial conception of such scaffolding is known as sublation-Hegel's Aufhebung, or "raising," as the philosophers Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur have understood this term. Metaphor is the agent of raising, or sublation, and sublation is inseparable from the productive life of metaphor, as distinct in its death in code or clich. At the same time, metaphor embodies the sense both of partial loss and of continuity, or preservation, also conveyed by the term Aufhebung. Anderson's study is simultaneously critical and historical. History and the theory are shown to be mutually enlightening, as are a wide variety of early modern texts and their specific cultural contexts. From beginning to end, this study touches the present, engaging questions about language, rhetoric, and reading within post-structuralism and neo-cognitivism. It highlights connections between intellectual problemsactive in our own culture and those evident in the earlier texts, controversies, and crises Anderson analyzes. In this way, the study is bifocal, like metaphor itself. While Anderson's overarching concern is with metaphor as a creative exchange, a source of code-breaking conceptual power, each of her chapters focuses on a different but related issue and cultural sector. Foci include the basic conditions of linguistic meaning in the early modern period, instantiated by Shakespeare's plays and related to modern theories of metaphor; the role of metaphor in the words of eucharistic institution under Archbishop Cranmer; the play of metaphor and metonymy in the writings of Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin and in John Donne's Devotions; the manipulation of these two tropes in the politics of the controversy over ecclesiastical vestments and in its treatment by John Foxe; the abuse of figuration in the house of Edmund Spenser's Busirane, where catachresis, an extreme form of metaphor, is the trope du jour; the conception of metaphor in the Roman rhetorics and their legacy in the sixteenth century; and the concept of exchange in the economic writing of Gerrard de Malynes, merchant and metaphorist in the reigns of Elizabeth and James. What emerges at the end of this book is a heightened critical sense of the dynamic of metaphor in cultural history.
Main Description
In this wide-ranging book, Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric, and economics. Invoking a provocative metaphorical concept from Andy Clark's version of cognitive science, she construes metaphor as a form of scaffolding fundamental to human culture. A more traditional or controversial conception of this is "sublation" - Hegel's Aufhebung, or "raising," as the philosophers Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur have understood the term. From beginning to end, this study not only shows how history and theory can be mutually enlightening, but touches also upon the present, engaging questions about language, rhetoric, and reading within poststructuralism and neocognitivism.
Main Description
In this wide-ranging book, Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric, and economics. Invoking a provocative metaphorical concept from Andy Clark's version of cognitive science, sheconstrues metaphor as a form of scaffolding fundamental to human culture. A more traditional or controversial conception of this is "sublation" - Hegel's Aufhebung, or "raising," as the philosophers Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur have understood the term. From beginning to end, this study not onlyshows how history and theory can be mutually enlightening, but touches also upon the present, engaging questions about language, rhetoric, and reading within poststructuralism and neocognitivism.
Main Description
The title Translating Investments, a manifold pun, refers to metaphor and clothing, authority and interest, and trading and finance. Translation, Latin translatio, is historically a name for metaphor, and investment, etymologically a reference to clothing, participates both in the complex symbolism of early modern dress and in the cloth trade of the period. In this original and wide-ranging book, Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric, and economics during the reigns of the Tudors and early Stuarts. Invoking a provocative metaphorical concept from Andy Clark's version of cognitive science, she construes metaphor itself as a form of scaffolding fundamental to human culture. A more traditional and controversial conception of such scaffolding is known as sublation-Hegel's Aufhebung, or "raising," as the philosophers Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur have understood this term. Metaphor is the agent of raising, or sublation, and sublation is inseparable from the productive life of metaphor, as distinct in its death in code or clich'. At the same time, metaphor embodies the sense both of partial loss and of continuity, or preservation, also conveyed by the term Aufhebung. Anderson's study is simultaneously critical and historical. History and the theory are shown to be mutually enlightening, as are a wide variety of early modern texts and their specific cultural contexts. From beginning to end, this study touches the present, engaging questions about language, rhetoric, and reading within post-structuralism and neo-cognitivism. It highlights connections between intellectual problems active in our own culture and those evident in the earlier texts, controversies, and crises Anderson analyzes. In this way, the study is bifocal, like metaphor itself. While Anderson's overarching concern is with metaphor as a creative exchange, a source of code-breaking conceptual power, each of her chapters focuses on a different but related issue and cultural sector. Foci include the basic conditions of linguistic meaning in the early modern period, instantiated by Shakespeare's plays and related to modern theories of metaphor; the role of metaphor in the words of eucharistic institution under Archbishop Cranmer; the play of metaphor and metonymy in the writings of Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin and in John Donne's Devotions; the manipulation of these two tropes in the politics of the controversy over ecclesiastical vestments and in its treatment by John Foxe; the abuse of figuration in the house of Edmund Spenser's Busirane, where catachresis, an extreme form of metaphor, is the trope du jour; the conception of metaphor in the Roman rhetorics and their legacy in the sixteenth century; and the concept of exchange in the economic writing of Gerrard de Malynes, merchant and metaphorist in the reigns of Elizabeth and James. What emerges at the end of this book is a heightened critical sense of the dynamic of metaphor in cultural history.
Main Description
The title Translating Investments, a manifold pun, refers to metaphor and clothing, authority and interest, and trading and finance. Translation, Latin translatio, is historically a name for metaphor, and investment, etymologically a reference to clothing, participates both in the complex symbolism of early modern dress and in the cloth trade of the period. In this original and wide-ranging book, Judith Anderson studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric, and economics during the reigns of the Tudors and early Stuarts. Invoking a provocative metaphorical concept from Andy Clark's version of cognitive science, she construes metaphor itself as a form of scaffolding fundamental to human culture. A more traditional and controversial conception of such scaffolding is known as sublation-Hegel's Aufhebung, or "raising," as the philosophers Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur have understood this term. Metaphor is the agent of raising, or sublation, and sublation is inseparable from the productive life of metaphor, as distinct in its death in code or cliché. At the same time, metaphor embodies the sense both of partial loss and of continuity, or preservation, also conveyed by the term Aufhebung. Anderson's study is simultaneously critical and historical. History and the theory are shown to be mutually enlightening, as are a wide variety of early modern texts and their specific cultural contexts. From beginning to end, this study touches the present, engaging questions about language, rhetoric, and reading within post-structuralism and neo-cognitivism. It highlights connections between intellectual problems active in our own culture and those evident in the earlier texts, controversies, and crises Anderson analyzes. In this way, the study is bifocal, like metaphor itself. While Anderson's overarching concern is with metaphor as a creative exchange, a source of code-breaking conceptual power, each of her chapters focuses on a different but related issue and cultural sector. Foci include the basic conditions of linguistic meaning in the early modern period, instantiated by Shakespeare's plays and related to modern theories of metaphor; the role of metaphor in the words of eucharistic institution under Archbishop Cranmer; the play of metaphor and metonymy in the writings of Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin and in John Donne's Devotions; the manipulation of these two tropes in the politics of the controversy over ecclesiastical vestments and in its treatment by John Foxe; the abuse of figuration in the house of Edmund Spenser's Busirane, where catachresis, an extreme form of metaphor, is the trope du jour; the conception of metaphor in the Roman rhetorics and their legacy in the sixteenth century; and the concept of exchange in the economic writing of Gerrard de Malynes, merchant and metaphorist in the reigns of Elizabeth and James. What emerges at the end of this book is a heightened critical sense of the dynamic of metaphor in cultural history.
Unpaid Annotation
This book studies the functioning of metaphor as a constructive force within language, religious doctrine and politics, literature, rhetoric and economics. It shows how history and theory can be mutually enlightening, and it touches upon the present, asking questions about language, rhetoric and reading within poststructuralism and neocognitivism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Renaissance Metaphor and the Dynamic of Cultural Change: An Introductory Road Mapp. 1
Translating Investments: The Metaphoricity of Language, Hamlet, and 2 Henry IVp. 8
Language and History in the Reformation: Translating Matter to Metaphor in the Sacramentp. 36
Donne's Tropic Awareness: Metaphor, Metonymy, and Devotions upon Emergent Occasionsp. 61
Vesting Significance and Authority: The Vestiarian Controversy under Cranmer and Its Treatment by Foxep. 78
Busirane's Place: The House of Abusive Rhetoric in The Faerie Queenep. 112
Catachresis and Metaphor: "Be Bold, Be Bold, Be Not Too Bold" in the Latin Rhetorical Tradition and Its Renaissance Adaptorsp. 129
Exchanging Values: The Economic and Rhetorical World Seen by Gerrard de Malynes, Merchantp. 166
Notesp. 217
Works Citedp. 289
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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