Catalogue


Imagining the book /
edited by Stephen Kelly and John J. Thompson.
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, c2005.
description
xviii, 253 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
2503516939 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, c2005.
isbn
2503516939 (hbk.)
general note
Includes papers presented at a colloquium held in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in April, 2001.
catalogue key
5476259
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Contributors discuss early printed books and manuscripts between the 14th and 16th centuries under the section headings of: 'Imagined compilers and editors', 'Imagined patrons and collectors', Imagined readings and readers' and 'Beyond the book: verbal and visual cultures'.
Long Description
" Collectively, the contributors to Imagining the Book offer a snapshot of current research in English manuscript study in the pre-modern period on the inter-related topics of patrons and collectors, compilers, editors and readers, and identities beyond the book. This volume responds to the recent development and institutionalization of 'History of the Book' within the wider English Studies discipline. Scholars working in the pre-printing era with the material vestiges of a predominantly manuscript culture are currently establishing their own models of production and reception. Research in this area is now an accepted part of twenty-first century Medieval Studies. Within such a context, it is frequently observed that scribal culture found imaginative ways to deal with the technological watersheds represented by the transition from memory to written record, roll to codex, or script to print. In such an 'eventful' environment, texts and books not infrequently slip through the semi-permeable boundaries laboured over by previous generations of medievalists, boundaries that demarcate orality and literacy; 'literary' and 'historical'; 'religious' and 'secular'; pre- and post-Conquest compositions, or 'Medieval' and 'Renaissance' attitudes and writings. Once texts are regarded as offering indices of community- or self-definition, or models of piety and good behaviour (and the codices holding them statements of prestige and influence), the book historian is left to contemplate the real or imagined importance and status of books and writting within the larger socio-political, often local, milieux in which they were once produced and read. All fourteen essays in this volume question the status of the book in a predominantly manuscript culture. Some focus on the practical politics of book production and local circumstances; others focus on the visual experience of early readers. In this volume, the idea of the pre-modern vernacular book is pursued in terms of its miscellaneity and its association with localised writing projects undertaken by (and occasionally also for) a polyglot and sometimes also socially-aware English readership. Such investigation is valuable since it enables us to recognise the textual networks, the sources and the readership that mark the pre-modern codex as an important medium of social and literary exchange quite distinct from printed books. 20050125 "
Main Description
This book offers a snapshot of current research in English manuscript study in the pre-modern period on the inter-related topics of patrons and collectors, compilers, editors and readers, and identities beyond the book. This volume responds to the recent development and institutionalization of 'History of the Book' within the wider English Studies discipline. Scholars working in the pre-printing era with the material vestiges of a predominantly manuscript culture are currently establishing their own models of production and reception. Research in this area is now an accepted part of twenty-first century Medieval Studies.
Table of Contents
Contributorsp. ix
Figuresp. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xv
Prefacep. xvii
Imagined Histories of the Book: Current Paradigms and Future Directionsp. 1
Imagined Compilers and Editors
The Whole Book: Late Medieval English Manuscript Miscellanies and their Modern Interpretersp. 17
Imagining X: A Lost Early Vernacular Miscellanyp. 31
Imagining Book Production in Fourteenth-Century Herefordshire: The Scribe of British Library, MS Harley 2253 and his 'Organizing Principles'p. 45
Imagining the Compiler: Guy of Warwick and the Compilation of the Auchinleck Manuscriptp. 61
Imagined Patrons and Collectors
Leofric of Exeter and the Practical Politics of Book Collectingp. 77
AElfric's Lives of Saints and Cotton Julius E. vii: Adaptation, Appropriation and the Disappearing Bookp. 99
A Fresh Look at the Reconstructed Carmelite Missal: London, British Library, MS Additional 29704-05p. 111
John Dygon, Fifth Recluse of Sheen: His Career, Books, and Acquaintancep. 127
Imagined Readings and Readers
Imagining a Readership for Post-Conquest Old English Manuscriptsp. 145
Constructing Audiences for Contemplative Texts: The Example of a Mystical Anthologyp. 159
EB and his Two Books: Visual Impact and the Power of Meaningful Suggestion. 'Reading' the Illustrations in MSS Douce 261 and Egerton 3132Ap. 173
Beyond the Book: Verbal and Visual Cultures
Deixis and the Untransferable Text: Anglo-Saxon Colophons, Verse-Prefaces and Inscriptionsp. 195
A Portrait of the Reader: Secular Donors and their Books in the Art of the English Parish Churchp. 209
Imagining Alternatives to the Book: The Transmission of Political Poetry in Late Medieval Englandp. 237
Index of Manuscriptsp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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