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An end to evil : how to win the war on terror /
David Frum, Richard Perle.
edition
1st mass market ed.
imprint
New York : Ballantine, 2004.
description
vii, 280 p. ; 18 cm.
ISBN
0345477170
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Ballantine, 2004.
isbn
0345477170
catalogue key
5467917
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Frum, a former special assistant to President George W. Bush, is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a contributing editor of National Review Richard Perle served as an assistant secretary of defense in the Reagan administration and as chairman of the Defense Policy Board under President George W. Bush. He is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
Chapter 1 WHAT NOW? These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. -THOMAS PAINE, The American Crisis, 1780 We too live in trying times-and thus far our fellow Americans have passed every test. They have shown themselves, as President Bush said in his speech in the National Cathedral on September 14, 2001, "generous and kind, resourceful and brave." They have fought and won two campaigns on the opposite side of the globe, saving millions of Afghans from famine and the nation of Iraq from tyranny. They have hunted down terrorists and killers, while respecting the rights of the innocent. And they have uncomplainingly accepted inconvenience and danger through tiresome years of lineups at airports, searches at public buildings, and exposure to further acts of terror. Now comes the hardest test of all. The war on terror is not over. In many ways, it has barely begun. Al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, and Hamas still plot murder, and money still flows from donors worldwide to finance them. Mullahs preach jihad from the pulpits of mosques from Bengal to Brooklyn. Iran and North Korea are working frantically to develop nuclear weapons. While our enemies plot, our allies dither and carp, and much of our own government remains ominously unready for the fight. We have much to do and scant time in which to do it. Yet at this dangerous moment many in the American political and media elite are losing their nerve for the fight. Perhaps it is the political cycle: For some Democrats, winning the war has become a less urgent priority than winning the next election. Perhaps it is the media, rediscovering its bias in favor of bad news and infecting the whole country with its own ingrown pessimism. Perhaps it is Congress, resenting the war's cost and coveting the money for its own domestic spending agendas. Or perhaps it is just fatigue. President Bush warned Americans from the start that the war on terror would be long and difficult and expensive. But in 2001 those warnings were just words. Today they are realities. And while the American people have shouldered those realities magnificently, America's leaders too often seem to flinch from them. Every difficulty, every casualty, every reverse seems to throw Washington, D.C., into a panic-as if there had ever been a war without difficulties, without casualties, without reverses. In the war on terror, the United States has as yet suffered no defeats, except of course for 9/11 itself. But defeats may well occur, for they too are part of war, and we shudder to think how some of our leaders in their current mood will respond. We can feel the will to win ebbing in Washington; we sense the reversion to the bad old habits of complacency and denial. Throughout the 1990s, thousands of terrorists received training in the al-Qaeda camps of Afghanistan-and our government passively monitored the situation. Terrorists attacked and murdered Americans in East Africa, in Yemen, in Saudi Arabia-and America responded to these acts of war as if they were ordinary crimes. Iraq flagrantly violated the terms of its 1991 armistice-and our government from time to time fired a cruise missile into Baghdad but otherwise did little. Iran defied the Monroe Doctrine and sponsored murder in our own hemisphere, killing eighty-six people and wounding some three hundred at a Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires-and our government did worse than nothing: It opened negotiations with the murderers. Mullahs and imams incited violence and slaughter against Christians and Jews-and our government failed to acknowledge that anything important was occurring.
First Chapter
Chapter 1
WHAT NOW?

These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.
-THOMAS PAINE, The American Crisis, 1780

We too live in trying times-and thus far our fellow Americans have passed every test. They have shown themselves, as President Bush said in his speech in the National Cathedral on September 14, 2001, "generous and kind, resourceful and brave." They have fought and won two campaigns on the opposite side of the globe, saving millions of Afghans from famine and the nation of Iraq from tyranny. They have hunted down terrorists and killers, while respecting the rights of the innocent. And they have uncomplainingly accepted inconvenience and danger through tiresome years of lineups at airports, searches at public buildings, and exposure to further acts of terror.

Now comes the hardest test of all. The war on terror is not over. In many ways, it has barely begun. Al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, and Hamas still plot murder, and money still flows from donors worldwide to finance them. Mullahs preach jihad from the pulpits of mosques from Bengal to Brooklyn. Iran and North Korea are working frantically to develop nuclear weapons. While our enemies plot, our allies dither and carp, and much of our own government remains ominously unready for the fight. We have much to do and scant time in which to do it.

Yet at this dangerous moment many in the American political and media elite are losing their nerve for the fight. Perhaps it is the political cycle: For some Democrats, winning the war has become a less urgent priority than winning the next election. Perhaps it is the media, rediscovering its bias in favor of bad news and infecting the whole country with its own ingrown pessimism. Perhaps it is Congress, resenting the war's cost and coveting the money for its own domestic spending agendas.

Or perhaps it is just fatigue. President Bush warned Americans from the start that the war on terror would be long and difficult and expensive. But in 2001 those warnings were just words. Today they are realities. And while the American people have shouldered those realities magnificently, America's leaders too often seem to flinch from them. Every difficulty, every casualty, every reverse seems to throw Washington, D.C., into a panic-as if there had ever been a war without difficulties, without casualties, without reverses. In the war on terror, the United States has as yet suffered no defeats, except of course for 9/11 itself. But defeats may well occur, for they too are part of war, and we shudder to think how some of our leaders in their current mood will respond.

We can feel the will to win ebbing in Washington; we sense the reversion to the bad old habits of complacency and denial.

Throughout the 1990s, thousands of terrorists received training in the al-Qaeda camps of Afghanistan-and our government passively monitored the situation. Terrorists attacked and murdered Americans in East Africa, in Yemen, in Saudi Arabia-and America responded to these acts of war as if they were ordinary crimes. Iraq flagrantly violated the terms of its 1991 armistice-and our government from time to time fired a cruise missile into Baghdad but otherwise did little. Iran defied the Monroe Doctrine and sponsored murder in our own hemisphere, killing eighty-six people and wounding some three hundred at a Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires-and our government did worse than nothing: It opened negotiations with the murderers. Mullahs and imams incited violence and slaughter against Christians and Jews-and our government failed to acknowledge that anything important was occurring.

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-01-05:
From one former and one present Bush staffer comes a highly charged domestic and foreign policy manifesto for dealing with the terrorist threat. In delivering their "manual for victory" for the war on terror, Frum (The Right Man) and Perle (a mamber of the Defense Policy Board) urge "a new commitment to security at home, a new audacity in our strategy abroad, and a new boldness in the advocacy of American ideals." In direct, often bulleted prose, the authors voice strong support for President Bush's current policies and initiatives, including the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and for his policy of preemptive strikes where there is a perceived threat. They also push for a more vigilant "self-policed" America, the use of national ID cards, unwavering support for Israel, a hard line with Libya, Syria and the Saudis, and indifference toward European governments that stand in our way. The book's most compelling argument, however, is for the need to reform the bureaucracy that failed us on 9/11-this includes both the CIA and the FBI, as well as the need to better enforce existing immigration laws. Despite the authors' insider resumes, little here is groundbreaking. Many of their opinions and arguments are those debated daily in the media. The book is also highly partisan-former President Clinton is treated with contempt, described as "weak-willed" and "lacking the character" to deal properly with the budding threat posed by Osama bin Laden or with Saddam Hussein's expulsion of U.N. inspectors. Nevertheless, this is a comprehensive, no-nonsense primer on the conservative approach to handling the terrorist threat. (Jan. 6) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-09-01:
Frum (The Right Man) and Perle, former assistant secretary of defense, are on the lookout for the next generation of terrorists-while having some unkind things to say about France, Saudi Arabia, and the UN. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A not completely crazy case can be made that the most influential thinker in the foreign-policy apparatus of the Administration of George W. Bush during its first two years was not one of the familiar members of the gold-shielded Praetorian Guardnot Dick Cheney or Colin Powell, not Condi or Rummy, not Tenet or Wolfowitzbut, rather, a forty-two-year-old Canadian named David Frum." Hendrik Hertzberg, The New Yorker "[Richard Perle is the] intellectual guru of the hard-line neoconservative movement in foreign policy. . . . [He] has profound influence over Bush policies and officials in the competition for the hearts of the president and his national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice." Dana Milbank, The Washington Post From the Hardcover edition.
This item was reviewed in:
Los Angeles Times, February 2004
New York Times Book Review, February 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
From two of Washington's most influential insiders, An End to Evil charts the agenda for what's next in the war on terrorism. This world is an unsafe place for Americans-and a massive all-fronts effort is essential to protecting our people. Now David Frum and Richard Perle sound the alert about the dangers around us: the continuing threat from terrorism and Islamist extremism, the danger from North Korea, the daunting challenge of homeland security. Frum and Perle provide a detailed, candid account of America's vulnerabilities: a military whose leaders resist change, intelligence agencies mired in bureaucracy, diplomats who put friendly relations ahead of the nation's security interests. With keen insiders' perspective, Frum and Perle lay out a bold program to defend America-and to win the war on terror. They make a convincing argument for why the toughest line is the safest line.
Main Description
An End to Evil charts the agenda for what's next in the war on terrorism, as articulated by David Frum, former presidential speechwriter and bestselling author of The Right Man, and Richard Perle, former assistant secretary of defense and one of the most influential foreign-policy leaders in Washington. This world is an unsafe place for Americansand the U.S. government remains unready to defend its people. In An End to Evil, David Frum and Richard Perle sound the alert about the dangers around us: the continuing threat from terrorism, the crisis with North Korea, the aggressive ambitions of China. Frum and Perle provide a detailed, candid account of America's vulnerabilities: a military whose leaders resist change, intelligence agencies mired in bureaucracy, diplomats who put friendly relations with their foreign colleagues ahead of the nation's interests. Perle and Frum lay out a bold program to defend Americaand to win the war on terror. Among the topics this book addresses: why the United States risks its security if it submits to the authority of the United Nations why France and Saudi Arabia have to be treated as adversaries, not allies, in the war on terror why the United States must take decisive action against Irannow what to do in North Korea if negotiations fail why everything you read in the newspapers about the Israeli-Arab dispute is wrong how our government must be changed if we are to fight the war on terror to victorynot just stalemate where the next great terror threat is coming fromand what we can do to protect ourselves An End to Evil will define the conservative point of view on foreign policy for a new generationand shape the agenda for the 2004 presidential-election year and beyond. With a keen insiders' perspective on how our leaders are confrontingor not confrontingthe war on terrorism, David Frum and Richard Perle make a convincing argument for why the toughest line is the safest line. From the Hardcover edition.
Main Description
An End to Evilcharts the agenda for what's next in the war on terrorism, as articulated by David Frum, former presidential speechwriter and bestselling author of The Right Man,and Richard Perle, former assistant secretary of defense and one of the most influential foreign-policy leaders in Washington. This world is an unsafe place for Americansand the U.S. government remains unready to defend its people. In An End to Evil,David Frum and Richard Perle sound the alert about the dangers around us: the continuing threat from terrorism, the crisis with North Korea, the aggressive ambitions of China. Frum and Perle provide a detailed, candid account of America's vulnerabilities: a military whose leaders resist change, intelligence agencies mired in bureaucracy, diplomats who put friendly relations with their foreign colleagues ahead of the nation's interests. Perle and Frum lay out a bold program to defend Americaand to win the war on terror. Among the topics this book addresses: why the United States risks its security if it submits to the authority of the United Nations why France and Saudi Arabia have to be treated as adversaries, not allies, in the war on terror why the United States must take decisive action against Irannow what to do in North Korea if negotiations fail why everything you read in the newspapers about the Israeli-Arab dispute is wrong how our government must be changed if we are to fight the war on terror to victorynot just stalemate where the next great terror threat is coming fromand what we can do to protect ourselves An End to Evilwill define the conservative point of view on foreign policy for a new generationand shape the agenda for the 2004 presidential-election year and beyond. With a keen insiders' perspective on how our leaders are confrontingor not confrontingthe war on terrorism, David Frum and Richard Perle make a convincing argument for why the toughest line is the safest line. From the Hardcover edition.
Table of Contents
What Now?p. 3
End of the Beginningp. 11
The New Axisp. 41
The War at Homep. 61
The War Abroadp. 97
The War of Ideasp. 147
Organizing for Victoryp. 193
Friends and Foesp. 235
A War for Libertyp. 275
Appendixp. 281
Acknowledgmentsp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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