Catalogue


Immigrant women in the settlement of Missouri /
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2005.
description
xiii, 149 p.
ISBN
0826215912 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2005.
isbn
0826215912 (alk. paper)
abstract
"Focuses on the lives of immigrant women in Missouri from the colonial period to the Civil War to industrialization. Draws heavily on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of immigrant women from many social classes and ethnic backgrounds and contains photographs and narratives relating to immigrant life"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
5461187
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering first looked at how immigration has affected Missouri's cultural landscape in their popular bookGerman Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways. Now they tell the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri. Drawing heavily on the women's own stories,Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouriillustrates common elements of their lives without minimizing the diversity and complexity of each individual's experience. The book begins with descriptions culled from diaries, letters, and memoirs documenting preparations for the journey, the perilous Atlantic crossing, and the sometimes equally long and arduous trip from the port of entry to Missouri. Burnett and Luebbering go on to examine how women, once in Missouri, coped with the problems of daily life in an unfamiliar and occasionally hostile environment. Whether it was the hardships of the frontier, the harsh realities of urban life, childbirth, the deaths of family members, isolation, or prejudice, their new lives brought numerous challenges. Many found success and contentment, as well, and the book also documents their joys and triumphs: physical survival, economic prosperity, thriving families, friendships, and community celebrations. Because it examines the lives of women from many social classes and ethnic backgrounds,Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouridoes much to explain the rich cultural diversity Missouri enjoys today. The photographs and narratives relating to Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, and Polish life will remind descendants of immigrants that many customs and traditions they grew up practicing have roots in their home countries and will also promote understanding of the customs of other cultures. In addition to the ethnic and class differences that affected these women's lives, the book also notes the impact of the various eras in which they lived, their education, the circumstances of their migrations, and their destinations across Missouri. With their engaging and straightforward narrative, Burnett and Luebbering take the reader chronologically through the history of the state from the colonial period to the Civil War and industrialization. Like all Missouri Heritage Readers, this one is presented in an accessible format with abundant illustrations, and it is sure to please both general readers and those engaged in immigrant and women's studies.
Main Description
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering first looked at how immigration has affected Missouri’s cultural landscape in their popular book German Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways. Now they tell the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri. Drawing heavily on the women’s own stories, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouriillustrates common elements of their lives without minimizing the diversity and complexity of each individual’s experience. The book begins with descriptions culled from diaries, letters, and memoirs documenting preparations for the journey, the perilous Atlantic crossing, and the sometimes equally long and arduous trip from the port of entry to Missouri. Burnett and Luebbering go on to examine how women, once in Missouri, coped with the problems of daily life in an unfamiliar and occasionally hostile environment. Whether it was the hardships of the frontier, the harsh realities of urban life, childbirth, the deaths of family members, isolation, or prejudice, their new lives brought numerous challenges. Many found success and contentment, as well, and the book also documents their joys and triumphs: physical survival, economic prosperity, thriving families, friendships, and community celebrations. Because it examines the lives of women from many social classes and ethnic backgrounds, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouridoes much to explain the rich cultural diversity Missouri enjoys today. The photographs and narratives relating to Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, and Polish life will remind descendants of immigrants that many customs and traditions they grew up practicing have roots in their home countries and will also promote understanding of the customs of other cultures. In addition to the ethnic and class differences that affected these women’s lives, the book also notes the impact of the various eras in which they lived, their education, the circumstances of their migrations, and their destinations across Missouri. With their engaging and straightforward narrative, Burnett and Luebbering take the reader chronologically through the history of the state from the colonial period to the Civil War and industrialization. Like all Missouri Heritage Readers, this one is presented in an accessible format with abundant illustrations, and it is sure to please both general readers and those engaged in immigrant and women’s studies.
Short Annotation
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering first looked at how immigration has affected Missouri's cultural landscape in their popular book German Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways. Now they tell the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri.
Unpaid Annotation
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering first looked at how immigration has affected Missouri's cultural landscape in their popular book German Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways. Now they tell the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri. Drawing heavily on the women's own stories, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouri illustrates common elements of their lives without minimizing the diversity and complexity of each individual's experience. The book begins with descriptions culled from diaries, letters, and memoirs documenting preparations for the journey, the perilous Atlantic crossing, and the sometimes equally long and arduous trip from the port of entry to Missouri. Burnett and Luebbering go on to examine how women, once in Missouri, coped with the problems of daily life in an unfamiliar and occasionally hostile environment. Whether it was the hardships of the frontier, the harsh realities of urban life, childbirth, the deaths of family members, isolation, or prejudice, their new lives brought numerous challenges. Many found success and contentment, as well, and the book also documents their joys and triumphs: physical survival, economic prosperity, thriving families, friendships, and community celebrations. Because it examines the lives of women from many social classes and ethnic backgrounds, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouri does much to explain the rich cultural diversity Missouri enjoys today. The photographs and narratives relating to Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, and Polish life will remind descendants of immigrants that many customs and traditions they grew up practicing have roots in their home countries and will also promote understanding of the customs of other cultures. In addition to the ethnic and class differences that affected these women's lives, the book also notes the impact of the various eras in which they lived, their education, the circumstances of their migrations, and their destinations across Missouri. With their engaging and straightforward narrative, Burnett and Luebbering take the reader chronologically through the history of the state from the colonial period to the Civil War and industrialization. Like all Missouri Heritage Readers, this one is presented in an accessible format with abundant illustrations, and it is sure to please both general readers and those engaged in immigrant and women's studies.
Bowker Data Service Summary
"Focuses on the lives of immigrant women in Missouri from the colonial period to the Civil War to industrialization. Draws heavily on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of immigrant women from many social classes and ethnic backgrounds and contains photographs and narratives relating to immigrant life"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering first looked at how immigration has affected Missouri's cultural landscape in their popular book German Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways. Now they tell the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri. Drawing heavily on the women's own stories, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouriillustrates common elements of their lives without minimizing the diversity and complexity of each individual's experience. The book begins with descriptions culled from diaries, letters, and memoirs documenting preparations for the journey, the perilous Atlantic crossing, and the sometimes equally long and arduous trip from the port of entry to Missouri. Burnett and Luebbering go on to examine how women, once in Missouri, coped with the problems of daily life in an unfamiliar and occasionally hostile environment. Whether it was the hardships of the frontier, the harsh realities of urban life, childbirth, the deaths of family members, isolation, or prejudice, their new lives brought numerous challenges. Many found success and contentment, as well, and the book also documents their joys and triumphs: physical survival, economic prosperity, thriving families, friendships, and community celebrations. Because it examines the lives of women from many social classes and ethnic backgrounds, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouridoes much to explain the rich cultural diversity Missouri enjoys today. The photographs and narratives relating to Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, and Polish life will remind descendants of immigrants that many customs and traditions they grew up practicing have roots in their home countries and will also promote understanding of the customs of other cultures. In addition to the ethnic and class differences that affected these women's lives, the book also notes the impact of the various eras in which they lived, their education, the circumstances of their migrations, and their destinations across Missouri. With their engaging and straightforward narrative, Burnett and Luebbering take the reader chronologically through the history of the state from the colonial period to the Civil War and industrialization. Like all Missouri Heritage Readers, this one is presented in an accessible format with abundant illustrations, and it is sure to please both general readers and those engaged in immigrant and women's studies.
Long Description
Tells the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Robyn Burnett and Ken Luebbering tell the stories of women from all across Europe who left the Old World for Missouri. Drawing heavily on the women's own stories, the book illustrates common elements of their lives without minimizing the diversity and complexity of each individual's experience.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Immigrant Settlement in Missourip. 5
Women Immigrantsp. 13
Women in Early French Villagesp. 23
Women in Colonial St. Louisp. 30
Journey to Missourip. 36
Life in Early St. Louisp. 45
Immigrant Women on the Frontierp. 54
German Women and the Churchp. 60
Immigrant Women in Religious Ordersp. 69
Women and the Civil Warp. 79
Immigration after the Civil Warp. 87
Immigrant Farm Familiesp. 95
Town Lifep. 103
Immigrant Neighborhoods in St. Louisp. 111
Women and Work in Industrializing Missourip. 119
The First Decades of the Twentieth Centuryp. 126
Missouri's Patchwork Quiltp. 133
For More Readingp. 139
Indexp. 143
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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