Catalogue


Religion and identity in modern Russia : the revival of Orthodoxy and Islam /
[edited] by Juliet Johnson, Marietta Stepaniants, and Benjamin Forest.
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2005.
description
xiv, 149 p.
ISBN
0754642720 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2005.
isbn
0754642720 (alk. paper)
contents note
Religion after communism : belief, identity, and the Soviet legacy in Russia / Juliet Johnson -- Ethno-religious identity in modern Russia -- Orthodoxy and Islam compared / Marietta Stepaniants -- Orthodoxy, ethnicity, and mass ethnophobias in the late tsarist era / Liudmila Gatagova -- In search of the "Russian idea" : a view from inside the Russian Orthodox Church / Georgii Chistiakov -- Tolerance and extremism : Russian ethnicity in the Orthodox discourse of the 1990s / Svetlana Ryzhova -- Islam and the emergence of Tatar national identity / Aidar Yuzeev -- Islam and the construction of Tatar sociolinguistic identity / Suzanne Wertheim -- The search for ethnic and religious identity in Dagestan / Zagir Arukhov -- Modern identities in Russia : a new struggle for the soul? / Juliet Johnson.
catalogue key
5454952
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2005
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Focusing on the roles of Russian Orthodoxy and Islam in constituting, challenging and changing national and ethnic identities in Russia, this study takes Tsarist and Soviet legacies into account.
Unpaid Annotation
This book focuses on the roles of Russian Orthodoxy and Islam in constituting, challenging and changing national and ethnic identities in Russia.
Long Description
Focusing on the roles of Russian Orthodoxy and Islam in constituting, challenging and changing national and ethnic identities in Russia, this study takes Tsarist and Soviet legacies into account, paying special attention to the evolution of the relationship between religious teachings and political institutions through the late 19th and 20th centuries. The volume explicitly discusses and compares the role of Russia's two major religions, Orthodoxy and Islam, in forging identity in the modern era and brings an innovative blend of sociological, historical, linguistic and geographic scholarship to the problem of post-Soviet Russian identity.This comprehensive volume is suitable for courses on post-Soviet politics, Russian studies, religion and political culture.
Main Description
Focusing on the roles of Russian Orthodoxy and Islam in constituting, challenging and changing national and ethnic identities in Russia, this study takes Tsarist and Soviet legacies into account, paying special attention to the evolution of the relationship between religious teachings and political institutions through the late 19th and 20th centuries.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The contributors to this volume focus on the roles of Russian Orthodoxy and Islam in constituting, challenging, and changing national and ethnic identities in Russia.
Table of Contents
Religion after Communism: belief, identity, and the Soviet legacy in Russia
Ethno-religious identity in modern Russia: orthodoxy and Islam compared
Orthodoxy, ethnicity, and mass Ethnophobias in the late Tsarist era
In search of the "Russian Idea": a view from inside the Russian Orthodox church
Tolerance and extremism
Russian ethnicity in the Orthodox discourse of the 1990s
Islam and the emergence of Tatar National identity
Islam and the construction of Tatar sociolinguistic identity
The Ponticization of Ethnic religious identity in Dagestan
Modern identities in Russia: a new struggle for the soul?
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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