Catalogue


Evolutionary game theory, natural selection, and Darwinian dynamics /
Thomas L. Vincent, Joel S. Brown.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
description
xvii, 382 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521841704
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
isbn
0521841704
catalogue key
5446888
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joel S. Brown is a Professor of Biology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Reviews
Review Quotes
''¦ even-handedness, together with its peerless reasoning, helps this book stand out in a crowded field '¦ masterly book. '¦ time and again, Shanahan convinces us that Darwin's approach was relentlessly reconciliatory, pluralistic, and non dogmatic '¦ Because it is equally ardent and articulate, Shanahan own relentlessly moderate voice is likely to survive the fashionable Sturn und Drang.'Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences
'? even-handedness, together with its peerless reasoning, helps this book stand out in a crowded field ? masterly book. ? time and again, Shanahan convinces us that Darwin's approach was relentlessly reconciliatory, pluralistic, and non dogmatic ? Because it is equally ardent and articulate, Shanahan own relentlessly moderate voice is likely to survive the fashionable Sturn und Drang.' Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences
Review of the hardback: 'It's complicated, but it's where biology is at, and Vincent and Brown clarify the issues wonderfully.' Biologist
Review of the hardback: '... provides a formal game-theoretic framework for addressing an impressive array of biological questions.' Journal of Mammalian Evolution
'It's complicated, but it's where biology is at, and Vincent and Brown clarify the issues wonderfully.' Biologist
'... provides a formal game-theoretic framework for addressing an impressive array of biological questions.' Journal of Mammalian Evolution
''¦ provides a formal game-theoretic framework for addressing an impressive array of biological questions.'Journal of Mammalian Evolution
Review of the hardback: '... even-handedness, together with its peerless reasoning, helps this book stand out in a crowded field ... masterly book. ... time and again, Shanahan convinces us that Darwin's approach was relentlessly reconciliatory, pluralistic, and non dogmatic ... Because it is equally ardent and articulate, Shanahan's own relentlessly moderate voice is likely to survive the fashionable Sturn und Drang.' Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences
Review of the hardback: 'The book is written in an enthusiastic style. In several places you can still perceive the excitement the authors must have felt when they embarked on their work in evolutionary dynamics ... a must-read for those interested in the history of evolutionary game theory ...' www.PalArch.nl
'The book is written in an enthusiastic style. in several places you can still perceive the excitement the authors must have felt when they embarked on their work in evolutionary dynamics ... a must-read for those interested in the history of evolutionary game theory ...' www.PalArch.nl
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Many topics in natural selection are investigated including co-evolution, speciation, and extinction. It may be described as a book on mathematical Darwinism. Darwin used logical verbal arguments to understand evolution. These arguments are presented here in a mathematical setting useful for both understanding evolution and allowing for prediction as well.
Main Description
All of life is a game, and evolution by natural selection is no exception. The evolutionary game theory developed in this 2005 book provides the tools necessary for understanding many of nature's mysteries, including co-evolution, speciation, extinction and the major biological questions regarding fit of form and function, diversity, procession, and the distribution and abundance of life. Mathematics for the evolutionary game are developed based on Darwin's postulates leading to the concept of a fitness generating function (G-function). G-function is a tool that simplifies notation and plays an important role developing Darwinian dynamics that drive natural selection. Natural selection may result in special outcomes such as the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). An ESS maximum principle is formulated and its graphical representation as an adaptive landscape illuminates concepts such as adaptation, Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, and the nature of life's evolutionary game.
Main Description
All of life is a game and evolution by natural selection is no exception. The evolutionary game theory developed in this book provides the tools necessary for understanding many of nature's mysteries, including co-evolution, speciation, extinction and the major biological questions regarding fit of form and function, diversity, procession, and the distribution and abundance of life. Mathematics for the evolutionary game are developed based on Darwin's postulates leading to the concept of a fitness generating function (G-function). G-function is a tool that simplifies notation and plays an important role developing Darwinian dynamics that drive natural selection. Natural selection may result in special outcomes such as the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). An ESS maximum principle is formulated and its graphical representation as an adaptive landscape illuminates concepts such as adaptation, Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, and the nature of life's evolutionary game.
Description for Bookstore
In this 2005 book, many topics in natural selection are investigated including co-evolution, speciation, and extinction. It may be described as a book on mathematical Darwinism. Darwin used logical verbal arguments to understand evolution. These arguments are presented here in a mathematical setting useful for both understanding evolution and allowing for prediction as well.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. x
Prefacep. xv
Understanding natural selectionp. 1
Natural selectionp. 2
Genetical approaches to natural selectionp. 7
Natural selection as an evolutionary gamep. 10
Road mapp. 21
Underlying mathematics and philosophyp. 26
Scalars, vectors, and matricesp. 28
Dynamical systemsp. 33
Biological population modelsp. 39
Examples of population modelsp. 42
Classical stability conceptsp. 49
The Darwinian gamep. 61
Classical gamesp. 62
Evolutionary gamesp. 72
Evolution by natural selectionp. 83
G-functions for the Darwinian gamep. 88
How to create a G-functionp. 89
Types of G-functionsp. 91
G-functions with scalar strategiesp. 92
G-functions with vector strategiesp. 93
G-functions with resourcesp. 96
Multiple G-functionsp. 99
G-functions in terms of population frequencyp. 103
Multistage G-functionsp. 106
Non-equilibrium dynamicsp. 110
Darwinian dynamicsp. 112
Strategy dynamics and the adaptive landscapep. 113
The source of new strategies: heritable variation and mutationp. 116
Ecological time and evolutionary timep. 119
G-functions with scalar strategiesp. 120
G-functions with vector strategiesp. 131
G-functions with resourcesp. 140
Multiple G-functionsp. 141
G-functions in terms of population frequencyp. 143
Multistage G-functionsp. 144
Non-equilibrium Darwinian dynamicsp. 145
Stability conditions for Darwinian dynamicsp. 147
Variance dynamicsp. 149
Evolutionarily stable strategiesp. 151
Evolution of evolutionary stabilityp. 153
G-functions with scalar strategiesp. 160
G-functions with vector strategiesp. 168
G-functions with resourcesp. 170
Multiple G-functionsp. 174
G-functions in terms of population frequencyp. 180
Multistage G-functionsp. 183
Non-equilibrium Darwinian dynamicsp. 188
The ESS maximum principlep. 197
Maximum principle for G-functions with scalar strategiesp. 198
Maximum principle for G-functions with vector strategiesp. 205
Maximum principle for G-functions with resourcesp. 211
Maximum principle for multiple G-functionsp. 213
Maximum principle for G-functions in terms of population frequencyp. 219
Maximum principle for multistage G-functionsp. 222
Maximum principle for non-equilibrium dynamicsp. 225
Speciation and extinctionp. 231
Species conceptsp. 234
Strategy species conceptp. 236
Variance dynamicsp. 243
Mechanisms of speciationp. 251
Predator-prey coevolution and community evolutionp. 264
Wright's shifting balance theory and frequency-dependent selectionp. 266
Microevolution and macroevolutionp. 268
Incumbent replacementp. 272
Procession of lifep. 273
Matrix gamesp. 275
A maximum principle for the matrix gamep. 277
The 2 x 2 bi-linear gamep. 284
Non-linear matrix gamesp. 295
Evolutionary ecologyp. 304
Habitat selectionp. 304
Consumer-resource gamesp. 309
Plant ecologyp. 324
Foraging gamesp. 333
Managing evolving systemsp. 343
Evolutionary response to harvestingp. 344
Resource management and conservationp. 350
Chemotherapy-driven evolutionp. 359
Referencesp. 364
Indexp. 377
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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