Catalogue


Women scientists in fifties science fiction films /
Bonnie Noonan.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., 2005.
description
ix, 225 p.
ISBN
0786421304 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., 2005.
isbn
0786421304 (softcover : alk. paper)
abstract
"This book proposes that the social ideology of the 1950s, which was partly concerned with gender issues, saturated the "B" science fiction films of that era and inspired a new appreciation for the role of women in scientific advancements and other social achievements"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
5443828
 
Filmography.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Bonnie Noonan is a professor of English at Xavier University of Louisiana.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
In the 1950s, science was rapidly advancing, and so were scientific opportunities for women. Modern science fiction films reflected these simultaneous social developments. This book proposes that the social ideology of the 1950s, which was partly concerned with gender issues, saturated the B science fiction films of that era and inspired a new appreciation for the role of women in scientific advancements and other social achievements.Drawing on feminist literary and cultural theory, the author argues that the emergence of the modern American science fiction film in 1950 and the situation of post-World War II female scientists together created a film genre. That genre was explicitly amenable to exploring the tension between a woman's place in her home and her place in the work force, particularly in scientific fields. Early chapters provide a general introduction to the science fiction genre and specifically describe 1950s B science fiction films as they resonate with concerns proper to feminist theory. Subsequent chapters offer detailed, historically situated readings of 10 B science fiction films from the 1950s that feature women in science. The cinematic representations of female scientists are compared and contrasted with real female professionals of the time, illuminating the changing gender dynamics reflected in popular film in the 1950s. Films analyzed include Rocketship X-M, It Came from Beneath the Sea, Them!, Tarantula, The Deadly Mantis, Beginning of the End, Kronos, Cat-Women of the Moon, World Without End, and Queen of Outer Space.
Main Description
In the 1950s, science was rapidly advancing, and so were scientific opportunities for women. Modern science fiction films reflected these simultaneous social developments. This book proposes that the social ideology of the 1950s, which was partly concerned with gender issues, saturated the B science fiction films of that era and inspired a new appreciation for the role of women in scientific advancements and other social achievements. Drawing on feminist literary and cultural theory, the author argues that the emergence of the modern American science fiction film in 1950 and the situation of post-World War II female scientists together created a film genre. That genre was explicitly amenable to exploring the tension between a woman's place in her home and her place in the work force, particularly in scientific fields. Early chapters provide a general introduction to the science fiction genre and specifically describe 1950s B science fiction films as they resonate with concerns proper to feminist theory. Subsequent chapters offer detailed, historically situated readings of 10 B science fiction films from the 1950s that feature women in science. The cinematic representations of female scientists are compared and contrasted with real female professionals of the time, illuminating the changing gender dynamics reflected in popular film in the 1950s. Films analyzed include Rocketship X-M, It Came from Beneath the Sea, Them!, Tarantula, The Deadly Mantis, Beginning of the End, Kronos, Cat-Women of the Moon, World Without End, and Queen of Outer Space.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Prefacep. 1
Definitions and Historiesp. 9
Constructing a Canon of 1950s B Science Fiction Filmsp. 25
Representation of Women Scientistsp. 48
Professionalism and Femininity in the Giant Insect Filmsp. 72
Cinematically Representing a Heteroglot Worldp. 103
Dreaming, Analyzing, and Joking in the Women-in-Power Filmsp. 127
Conclusion. Where to Go from Herep. 155
Filmographyp. 163
Female Leads and Their Father Figuresp. 193
Female Leads and Their Love Interestsp. 194
Notesp. 195
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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