Catalogue


Russia in the European context, 1789-1914 : a member of the family /
edited by Susan P. McCaffray and Michael Melancon.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
description
x, 238 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1403968551 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
isbn
1403968551 (cloth)
catalogue key
5443336
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This book makes a significant contribution to the debate over the nature of Imperial Russian history. Not everyone will agree with it, but all those who study the subject will have to contend with its bold assertion of Russia's Europeanness." --Steven G. Marks, author ofHow Russia Shaped the Modern World "Kudos to the editors and contributors! Imperial Russia comes alive very much as a 'normal' society with commonality with the rest of Europe as well as uniqueness." --David M. Goldfrank, Georgetown University
Flap Copy
"This book makes a significant contribution to the debate over the nature of Imperial Russian history. Not everyone will agree with it, but all those who study the subject will have to contend with its bold assertion of Russia's Europeanness." --Steven G. Marks, author of "How Russia Shaped the Modern World "Kudos to the editors and contributors! Imperial Russia comes alive very much as a 'normal' society with commonality with the rest of Europe as well as uniqueness." --David M. Goldfrank, Georgetown University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-02-01:
These excellent and quite stimulating articles revisit the topic of Russia's relationship to Europe during the "long 19th century" (1789-1914) from the vantage point of contemporary scholarship. While Russia traditionally has been viewed as outside typical European developments, the authors of these articles strive to show that Russia during these years was wholly European, arguing that the usual conception of "typical" European institutions and ideas is far too restrictive. Instead, by placing Russia in the continuum of European developments, the authors provide examples of particular topics to show that Russia and Russians fully participated in the major debates and developments in Europe during these years. The essays follow one of two broad themes: the attempts by Russians both inside and outside government to construct a modern economy, and the development of Russian society in light of European events. For example, one essay provides a reinterpretation of well-known czarist political leader Sergei Witte, placing his work in the context of European railroad building and economic thought. Another essay closely examines clubs and organizations in one Russian city, showing how closely they resembled those in Germany. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. N. M. Brooks New Mexico State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book makes a significant contribution to the debate over the nature of Imperial Russian history. Not everyone will agree with it, but all those who study the subject will have to contend with its bold assertion of Russia's Europeanness."--Steven G. Marks, author of "How Russia Shaped the Modern World"Kudos to the editors and contributors! Imperial Russia comes alive very much as a 'normal' society with commonality with the rest of Europe as well as uniqueness."--David M. Goldfrank, Georgetown University
"This book makes a significant contribution to the debate over the nature of Imperial Russian history. Not everyone will agree with it, but all those who study the subject will have to contend with its bold assertion of Russia's Europeanness." --Steven G. Marks, author of How Russia Shaped the Modern World "Kudos to the editors and contributors! Imperial Russia comes alive very much as a 'normal' society with commonality with the rest of Europe as well as uniqueness." --David M. Goldfrank, Georgetown University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Contributors survey Russian society & economy in the 19th century & argue that Russian institutions, practices & ideas fit the general European pattern for that period of rapid change.
Description for Bookstore
This volume surveys nineteenth century Russian society and economy and finds that Russian institutions, practices and ideas fit the general European pattern for that period of rapid change. In the nineteenth century there were still many different ways to be European, and excessive generalization obscures the great diversity that still characterized European civilization. Moreover, these essays bring to light several points at which Russian legislation and thinking provided models for others to follow. The authors focus on key elements of how Russians envisaged and constructed their economy and society. This is an important contribution that increases understanding of Russian history at a time when Russia's relationship with the "West" is again debated.
Short Annotation
"This book makes a significant contribution to the debate over the nature of Imperial Russian history. Not everyone will agree with it, but all those who study the subject will have to contend with its bold assertion of Russia's Europeanness." --Steven G. Marks, author of How Russia Shaped the Modern World
Table of Contents
Notes on Contributorsp. ix
Introduction: A Member of the Family-Russia's Place in Europe, 1789-1914p. 1
Envisioning an Economyp. 11
The Ties that Bind: The Role of the Russian Clan in Inheritance and Property Lawp. 13
Capital, Industriousness, and Private Banks in the Economic Imagination of a Nineteenth-Century Statesmanp. 33
Toward a Comprehensive Law: Tsarist Factory Labor Legislation in European Context, 1830-1914p. 49
Rereading Old Texts: Sergei Witte and the Industrialization of Russiap. 71
Religious and Nationalist Aspects of Entrepreneurialism in Russiap. 85
Envisioning a Societyp. 95
The Role of "Europe" in Russian Nationalism: Reinterpreting the Relationship between Russia and the West in Slavophile Thoughtp. 97
Statistics, Social Science, and Social Justice: The Zemstvo Statisticians of Pre-Revolutionary Russiap. 113
"The Temple of Idleness": Associations and the Public Sphere in Provincial Russiap. 141
Russian Punishments in the European Mirrorp. 161
St. Petersburg Workers and Implementation of the Social Insurance Law of 1912p. 189
Russia's Outlooks on the Present and Future, 1910-1914: What the Press Tells Usp. 203
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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