Catalogue


Ties that bind : the story of an Afro-Cherokee family in slavery and freedom /
Tiya Miles.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
description
xix, 306 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520241320 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
isbn
0520241320 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Captivity -- Slavery -- Motherhood -- Property -- Christianity -- Nationhood -- Gold rush -- Removal -- Capture -- Freedom.
catalogue key
5434075
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-291) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tiya Miles is Assistant Professor in the Program in American Culture, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, and the Native American Studies Program at the University of Michigan
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"In this lyrical narrative about Shoeboots, Doll, and their descendants, Tiya Miles explores the constant push and tug between family connections and racial divides. Building on meticulous and inspired historical detective work, Miles shows what it might have felt like to be a slave and reassesses the convoluted ideas about race that slavery generated and left as a legacy."--Nancy Shoemaker, author of A Strange Likeness: Becoming Red and White in Eighteenth-Century North America " Ties That Bind is a haunting and innovative book. Tiya Miles refuses to avoid or cover over the most painful aspects of the shared stories of Indians and African Americans. Instead, Miles passionately defends the need to explore history, even when the facts provided by history are not those that contemporary people want to hear."--Peggy Pascoe, author of Relations of Rescue: The Search for Female Moral Authority in the American West, 1874-1939
Flap Copy
"In this lyrical narrative about Shoeboots, Doll, and their descendants, Tiya Miles explores the constant push and tug between family connections and racial divides. Building on meticulous and inspired historical detective work, Miles shows what it might have felt like to be a slave and reassesses the convoluted ideas about race that slavery generated and left as a legacy."--Nancy Shoemaker, author ofA Strange Likeness: Becoming Red and White in Eighteenth-Century North America "Ties That Bindis a haunting and innovative book. Tiya Miles refuses to avoid or cover over the most painful aspects of the shared stories of Indians and African Americans. Instead, Miles passionately defends the need to explore history, even when the facts provided by history are not those that contemporary people want to hear."--Peggy Pascoe, author ofRelations of Rescue: The Search for Female Moral Authority in the American West, 1874-1939
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-11-01:
Miles (Univ. of Michigan) traces the family of the Cherokee warrior Shoe Boots, his slave Doll, and their descendants from origins in early-19th-century Georgia through the Trail of Tears and subsequent history in Indian Territory in Oklahoma. The book focuses on Doll's life and struggle to define the legal, social, and racial status of herself and her children in the matrix of black, red, slave, and free. Unfortunately, a lack of sources leads the author to an overreliance on fictional works and, to fill in the gaps, far too many paragraphs beginning with "perhaps" and "maybe". Further, the book contains several questionable assertions, such as the claim that the Constitution reserved citizenship rights only for whites, and that American Indian people are "the only population indigenous to the United States." However, despite its shortcomings, the work should stimulate discussion on a number of issues regarding race, slavery, and how far historical methodology can be stretched to provide a voice for the voiceless. As such, libraries with collections on slavery and Native American history should purchase this book. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Undergraduates and above. D. Butts Gordon College (GA)
Reviews
Review Quotes
Along with a fascinating biography, this book offers an utterly original angle on American history itself.
Along with a fascinating biography, this book offers an utterly original angle on American history itself.-- New Haven Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This beautifully written book tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history--including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom. Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her--her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children--but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots's widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century.
Main Description
This beautifully written book tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history--including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom. Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, "Ties That Bind "vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her--her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children--but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Bootss widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century.
Long Description
This beautifully written book tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave, and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history--including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom. Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources,Ties That Bindvividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her--her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children--but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots's widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Shoeboots Family Tree
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Bone of my Bone: Slavery, Race, and Nation--East
Captivity
Slavery
Motherhood
Property
Christianity
Nationhood
Gold Rush
Of Blood and Bone: Freedom, Kinship, and Citizenship--West
Removal
Capture
Freedom Epilogue: Citizenship Coda: The Shoeboots Family Today
Research Methods and Challenges
Definition and Use of Terms
Cherokee Names and Mistaken Identities
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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