Catalogue


The next global stage : challenges and opportunities in our borderless world /
Kenichi Ohmae.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Wharton School Pub., c2005.
description
xxvi, 282 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
013147944X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Wharton School Pub., c2005.
isbn
013147944X
catalogue key
5429280
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
Kenichi Ohmae, one of world's leading business and corporate strategists, has written over 100 books, including The Mind of the Strategist, The Borderless World, The End of the Nation State, and The Invisible Continent. After earning a doctorate in nuclear engineering from MIT and working as a senior design engineer for Hitachi, he joined McKinsey and Company, rising to senior partner where he led the firm's Japan and Asia Pacific operations. Ohmae currently manages a number of companies that he founded, including Business Breakthrough (a distance learning platform for management education), EveryD.com (a click-and-mortar grocery delivery platform), and Dalian Neusoft Information Services (a BPO platform for data entry in double-bite languages). He is Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy at UCLA, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Korea University and Professor Emeritus at Ewha Women's University in Korea, Trustee and Adjunct Professor of Bond University in Australia, as well as Dean of Kenichi Ohmae Graduate School of Management of BBT University in Japan. In September 2002, he was named the advisor of Liaoning Province and Tianjin City in China.
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
The Global Stage IntroductionIdeas do not emerge perfectly formed. They are awkward amalgams of experience, insight, hopes, and inspiration. They arrive on stage, blinking under the bright lights, hesitant, unsure as to the audience's likely reaction. They evolve and develop, alert to changing reactions and circumstances.I have been rehearsing the arguments that form the backbone ofThe Global Stagefor over two decades. My previous books, includingThe Borderless WorldandThe Invisible Continent,examined many of the issues I am still exploring. Ideas, as I say, do not emerge in a state of perfection.In its genesis,The Global Stagehas been shaped by two forces.First, bearing witness to changing circumstances. Over the last two decades, the world has changed substantially. The economic, political, social, corporate, and personal rules that now apply bear scant relation to those applicable two decades ago.Different times require a new script.The trouble is that far too often we find ourselves reading from much the same tired script. With the expansion of the global economy has come a more unified view of the business world. It is seen as a totality in itself, not constricted by national barriers. This view has been acquired, not by the traditional cognitive route of reading textbooks or learned articles. Instead, it has come directly, through exposure to the world, frequent travel, and mixing with the world's business people. Paradoxically, perhaps, this breeds a similarity of outlook. Opinions and perspectives are shared; the type of developments in the political and economic worlds that are held to be important are shared too. With shared outlooks come shared solutions. But a common view of the world will not produce the unorthodox solutions and responses required by the global stage.Over the last 30 years, I have traveled to 60 countries as a consultant, speaker, and vacationer. Some countries, like the United States, I have visited over 600 times; Korea and Taiwan, 200 times each; and Malaysia, 100 times. Recently, I have been averaging six visits a year to China and have started a company in Dalian, as well as producing 18 hours of television programs seeking to explain what is really happening there in business and politics. I also spend a lot of time on the Gold Coast in Australia and in Whistler, Canada. Of course, as a Japanese national, I live in Tokyo and travel extensively within Japan.As you can see, I believe that nothing is more important than actually visiting the place, meeting with companies, and talking to CEOs, employees, and consumers. That is how you develop a feel for what is going on. For some of my visits, I have taken groups of 40-60 Japanese executives so they can witness first hand regions that are attracting money from the rest of the world. I have taken groups to Ireland to see how cross-border Business Process Outsourcing is reshaping its economy. I have taken them to see Italy's small towns that are thriving on the global stage. We have also visited Scandinavian countries to find out why they have emerged as the world's most competitive nations and Eastern Europe to see how they may be positioned in the extended 25-member European Union. The group has also visited China and the United States twice, as well as India, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Korea, and Australia.The executives who join me on these trips change their views of the world. Even in the days of the Internet and global cable news, walking around, listening, looking, and asking a question is still the best way to learn. Seeing what is happening in the world first hand changes perspectives. Having witnessed the global stage, executives then begin to read newspapers and watch television with different eyes. Gradually, their views broaden and they feel comf
Introduction or Preface
The Global Stage Introduction Ideas do not emerge perfectly formed. They are awkward amalgams of experience, insight, hopes, and inspiration. They arrive on stage, blinking under the bright lights, hesitant, unsure as to the audience's likely reaction. They evolve and develop, alert to changing reactions and circumstances. I have been rehearsing the arguments that form the backbone of The Global Stage for over two decades. My previous books, including The Borderless World and The Invisible Continent, examined many of the issues I am still exploring. Ideas, as I say, do not emerge in a state of perfection. In its genesis, The Global Stage has been shaped by two forces. First, bearing witness to changing circumstances. Over the last two decades, the world has changed substantially. The economic, political, social, corporate, and personal rules that now apply bear scant relation to those applicable two decades ago. Different times require a new script. The trouble is that far too often we find ourselves reading from much the same tired script. With the expansion of the global economy has come a more unified view of the business world. It is seen as a totality in itself, not constricted by national barriers. This view has been acquired, not by the traditional cognitive route of reading textbooks or learned articles. Instead, it has come directly, through exposure to the world, frequent travel, and mixing with the world's business people. Paradoxically, perhaps, this breeds a similarity of outlook. Opinions and perspectives are shared; the type of developments in the political and economic worlds that are held to be important are shared too. With shared outlooks come shared solutions. But a common view of the world will not produce the unorthodox solutions and responses required by the global stage. Over the last 30 years, I have traveled to 60 countries as a consultant, speaker, and vacationer. Some countries, like the United States, I have visited over 600 times; Korea and Taiwan, 200 times each; and Malaysia, 100 times. Recently, I have been averaging six visits a year to China and have started a company in Dalian, as well as producing 18 hours of television programs seeking to explain what is really happening there in business and politics. I also spend a lot of time on the Gold Coast in Australia and in Whistler, Canada. Of course, as a Japanese national, I live in Tokyo and travel extensively within Japan. As you can see, I believe that nothing is more important than actually visiting the place, meeting with companies, and talking to CEOs, employees, and consumers. That is how you develop a feel for what is going on. For some of my visits, I have taken groups of 40-60 Japanese executives so they can witness first hand regions that are attracting money from the rest of the world. I have taken groups to Ireland to see how cross-border Business Process Outsourcing is reshaping its economy. I have taken them to see Italy's small towns that are thriving on the global stage. We have also visited Scandinavian countries to find out why they have emerged as the world's most competitive nations and Eastern Europe to see how they may be positioned in the extended 25-member European Union. The group has also visited China and the United States twice, as well as India, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Korea, and Australia. The executives who join me on these trips change their views of the world. Even in the days of the Internet and global cable news, walking around, listening, looking, and asking a question is still the best way to learn. Seeing what is happening in the world first hand changes perspectives. Having witnessed the global stage, executives then begin to read newspapers and watch television with different eyes. Gradually, thei
First Chapter

Introduction

Ideas do not emerge perfectly formed. They are awkward amalgams of experience, insight, hopes, and inspiration. They arrive on stage, blinking under the bright lights, hesitant, unsure as to the audience's likely reaction. They evolve and develop, alert to changing reactions and circumstances.

I have been rehearsing the arguments that form the backbone ofThe Global Stagefor over two decades. My previous books, includingThe Borderless WorldandThe Invisible Continent,examined many of the issues I am still exploring. Ideas, as I say, do not emerge in a state of perfection.

In its genesis,The Global Stagehas been shaped by two forces.

First, bearing witness to changing circumstances. Over the last two decades, the world has changed substantially. The economic, political, social, corporate, and personal rules that now apply bear scant relation to those applicable two decades ago.Different times require a new script.

The trouble is that far too often we find ourselves reading from much the same tired script. With the expansion of the global economy has come a more unified view of the business world. It is seen as a totality in itself, not constricted by national barriers. This view has been acquired, not by the traditional cognitive route of reading textbooks or learned articles. Instead, it has come directly, through exposure to the world, frequent travel, and mixing with the world's business people. Paradoxically, perhaps, this breeds a similarity of outlook. Opinions and perspectives are shared; the type of developments in the political and economic worlds that are held to be important are shared too. With shared outlooks come shared solutions. But a common view of the world will not produce the unorthodox solutions and responses required by the global stage.

Over the last 30 years, I have traveled to 60 countries as a consultant, speaker, and vacationer. Some countries, like the United States, I have visited over 600 times; Korea and Taiwan, 200 times each; and Malaysia, 100 times. Recently, I have been averaging six visits a year to China and have started a company in Dalian, as well as producing 18 hours of television programs seeking to explain what is really happening there in business and politics. I also spend a lot of time on the Gold Coast in Australia and in Whistler, Canada. Of course, as a Japanese national, I live in Tokyo and travel extensively within Japan.

As you can see, I believe that nothing is more important than actually visiting the place, meeting with companies, and talking to CEOs, employees, and consumers. That is how you develop a feel for what is going on. For some of my visits, I have taken groups of 40-60 Japanese executives so they can witness first hand regions that are attracting money from the rest of the world. I have taken groups to Ireland to see how cross-border Business Process Outsourcing is reshaping its economy. I have taken them to see Italy's small towns that are thriving on the global stage. We have also visited Scandinavian countries to find out why they have emerged as the world's most competitive nations and Eastern Europe to see how they may be positioned in the extended 25-member European Union. The group has also visited China and the United States twice, as well as India, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Korea, and Australia.

The executives who join me on these trips change their views of the world. Even in the days of the Internet and global cable news, walking around, listening, looking, and asking a question is still the best way to learn. Seeing what is happening in the world first hand changes perspectives. Having witnessed the global stage, executives then begin to read newspapers and watch television with different eyes. Gradually, their views broaden and they feel comfortable in their roles as actors on the global stage. It does not necessarily come easily. New skills are required.

The second defining force behindThe Global Stageis that, over the last 20 years, I have witnessed some of the pioneers of the global economy first hand.

One of the first business leaders to be sympathetic to the notion of the truly global economy was the former CEO of Smith Kline Beecham, Henry Wendt. He saw cross-border alliances as a potential savior for the American pharmaceuticals industry and recognized that internationally based strategic alliances would become important, if not vital.

Henry realized that there were three dominant markets in the world – the US, Japan and the Far East, and Europe. Nosinglecompany could deal with and service all these markets effectively, no matter how powerful and dominant it might feel. No corporation could hope to cover a market of 700 million people that had a per capita GNP income in excess of $10,000.

Companies traditionally used a marketing strategy that depended on a sequential penetration of each market, whether it was a region or a country. Once you established yourself and your product in market A, then (and only then) you moved on to market B. But Henry Wendt proposed that when you have a good product you have to adopt a sprinkler model, penetrating various marketssimultaneously. One way to achieve this is through strategic, cross-border alliances.1

Henry Wendt entered into negotiations with Beecham, a company with a particularly high reputation in R&D, and a strong presence in Europe, and in time these negotiations led to a merger. Not only did he opt to go down the merger path, but also, with powerful symbolism, he moved the company's corporate headquarters from Pittsburgh to London.

Henry Wendt had foresight and vision. His notion of cross border alliances was truly innovative. In those days, such alliances and mergers were difficult since each large company was embedded in its domestic markets. These companies were also under the thumb of their respective domestic governments, with which they were closely linked and with which they closely identified. It is very difficult to abandon your home turf. (Witness the more recent outcry about outsourcing.) For one thing, there may be government resistance (as we have seen in merger talks across Germany and France). There are also media commentators, like mammoths or dinosaurs stuck in a freezing swamp, who describe such moves as unpatriotic and unprincipled. They tend to report on one or other side "winning" in any merger – witness Daimler Chrysler.

In a world where borders were weakening, cross-border alliances were the only way for a company to survive and prosper. In the pharmaceuticals world, drugs were becoming more standardized. The important and potentially profitable compounds and formulas became less distinct. This was accompanied by an astronomical rise in the cost of R&D. New regulations piled on both costs and delays. Yet the amount of money invested in R&D only had an indirect link to the level of success that could be achieved. A company could build up the best-equipped laboratories, staffed with the optimal mixture of experience and youthful brilliance. This never guaranteed success. There was still an element of chance whether the right leads would be pursued and the breakthroughs realized.

The dilemma is that when the R&D is successful and a super drug is born, you may not have adequate sales forces in the key markets of the world. So, the amortization of R&D money is less and, at the same time, you may have to keep expensive people in the field even when you don't have drugs to sell. This is the problem with industries like pharmaceuticals where high fixed costs demand size to justify them. That is why you need to seek strategic alliances and, sometimes, to go one step further to total cross-border mergers. In the mid-1980s, examples were few and far between. But now we see examples of cross border alliances and M&As almost daily in banking, airlines, retailing, power generation, automobiles, consumer and business electronics, machinery, and semi-conductors.

Size and capitalization did play a part. A medium-sized pharmaceuticals company might well spend $1 billion in R&D and have no results, but a larger company might be able to sink $3 billion, maybe more, into R&D. It could afford to miss the target more often and still remain profitable. Cross border alliances allowed more companies to do this. It was only possible, though, once they saw beyond their home markets. Today, the concept of cross border alliances is no longer a novelty. Henry's path breaking role deserves recognition.

Another early pioneer of the global economy was Walter Wriston, former chairman of Citibank. He saw globalization as an imperative, not because of management or business theories, but because of technological breakthroughs. He prophesized that competition between banks would no longer be based on banking services, but on acquiring better technology. Effectively, the company able to make decisions quicker, often in the fraction of a nanosecond, would be the winner.

Walter Wriston understood the future shape of banking – and of the global economy. It was to be based in a world without borders; it would float around decisions made in a split second, maybe sometimes by non-humans. Technology was to be the key to success in banking, and so the person at the helm of Citibank had to be technology savvy. But his vision left him in a minority. Twenty years ago, most top bankers were traditionalists. They saw relationships of trust and confidentiality forged among business and governmental hierarchies as the key to success, rather than technology. Technology was all very well, but it was for whiz kids, not bankers.

John Reid, Wriston's handpicked successor as head of Citibank in 1984, was not a product of the traditional east-coast banking establishment. Reid was a technologist. An MIT graduate, he had been working in Citibank on ATM applications and other electronic banking projects. At the time of his appointment, he was virtually unknown within the corporation. Some even greeted his appointment with the question: "John Who?"

Walter Wriston defended his decision by saying that it was very hard to teach technology to an established banker, but relatively easy to teach banking to a technology specialist. As for relationships, these would develop over time. Under Reid's stewardship Citibank became the largest bank in the world. Along the way, he astutely led Citibank through the Latin American financial crisis.

Yet another business leader who was ahead of his time was Akio Morita, co-founder of Sony. The original business was called Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo or Totsuko – TTK. This name, even in its abbreviated form, was too difficult for western markets. So Morita came up with the four-letter "Sony" to represent the quality of sound from his transistor radios. For Morita, the world was one big market with few or no barriers. He thought big, but was no megalomaniac. He famously advised companies to Think Globally, Act Locally. This philosophy was christened "glocal" by the Japanese magazine,Nikkei Business, and led to the coining of a new word,glocalization.

These visionaries shared many of my views about the then emerging global economy – explained in such books asTriad PowerandThe Borderless World.I was fortunate enough to exchange views with all three of them and many others in the mid-1980s and beyond. However, discussions on the importance of the region state proved more elusive and troublesome. I had to wait until the developments within China post-1998 to gain any sort of useful practical perspective on this issue.

Some Stage Directions

InThe Global Stage,with these intellectual antecedents in mind, I begin by looking at the state of the world and how we make sense of it.Part Onelooks at some of the areas of explosive growth (The World Tour) and identifies some of the characteristics of the global economy. It then looks back at the birth point of this new era (Opening Night). The section ends with an examination of the failure of traditional economics – and economists – to make sense of the global economy (The End of Economics).

In Part Two, I examine the major trends emerging on the global stage. In the opening section (Play Makers) I explore the development of the nation state and the dynamics of what I call the region state, the most useful and potent means of economic organization in the global economy. I go on (inPlatforms for Progress) to introduce the idea of platforms, such as the use of English, Windows, branding, and the U.S. dollar, as global means of communication, understanding, and commerce. Finally, I explore what parts of business have to change in line with the emerging economy. These include business systems and processes (Out and About: BPO); and products, people, logistics (Breaking the Chains).

InPart Three,I provide analysis of how these changes and trends will impact on governments (Reinventing Government), corporations, and individuals (The Futures Market). I look at some of the regions which might be the economic dynamos shaping the world beyond the global stage (The Next Stage). In the final section, I re-visit my book,The Mind of the Strategist, and think through the need for changes in the frameworks we use in developing corporate strategy on the global stage.

The Global Stagemakes sense of the world as I see it. Twenty years ago, globalization was a term, a theoretical concept. Now it is a reality.The Global Stageis part of a process of understanding the new rules that apply in this new world – and often there aren't rules to adequately explain what we now experience on a daily basis. It is not an end-point, nor is it a beginning, but I hope it is an important step forward for companies and individuals, as well as regional and national leaders.

Kenichi Ohmae
Tokyo
September 2004

1I explored this theme inTriad Power – The Coming Shape of Global Competition(1985).


Reviews
Review Quotes
Harvard Business Review's Review of The Next Global Stage The Next Global Stage:Challenges and Opportunities in Our Borderless World Kenichi Ohmae(Wharton School Publishing, 2005)In the early 1900s, German physicist Werner Heisenberg laid the foundations for quantum mechanics, a set of rules showing that at the subatomic level Newtonian physics was irrelevant. Just as quantum mechanics upstaged Newton, says strategist Kenichi Ohmae, a radical new model is upending old notions about the global economy. In this sprawling book, Ohmae warns that governments, businesses, and leaders that cling to their Newtonian approaches will become irrelevant themselves.The heart of Ohmae's thesis will be familiar to readers of his previous books, including The Borderless World (1990) and The Invisible Continent (2000): In the new global economy, the nation-state, and the protectionist economic thinking that goes with it, is obsolete. Nation-states have borders, armies, flags, currencies, and a development-stifling instinct to protect their economies from the outside world. As global economic players, they're being displaced by "region states"-borderless centers of vibrant economic activity that welcome global trade and investment, like the Shutoken metropolitan area of Japan and Guangzhou in China.If the rules of the old economy no longer apply, Ohmae ventures, then neither do the old rules of business. Fair enough. The problem is, he says, no one knows, or can know, what the new rules are: "By the time any rule book or user's manual appears...the 'new rules' will already be obsolete." What business leaders can be sure of, Ohmae argues, is that massive change without requires massive change within. That means wall-to-wall rethinking of corporate mission, strategy, and organization. Companies must cut loose from their "ancestry" and, for instance, compete by selling the very products that threaten them. Clinging to the core, as Kodak did in the face of predation by digital-camera makers, is a recipe for failure in this new age.Companies must cast off their sentimental attachment to the nation-states where they're headquartered and jettison their hierarchies and old approaches to markets. Their leaders must become visionary facilitators without preconceived attitudes about their roles-ready to embrace even the idea that the best leader may be a team, not an individual. There can be no half measures in this radical transformation, Ohmae says, no testing the waters before taking the plunge.It's a strong prescription. Unfortunately, this lively book can't, by its own admission, give business readers what they want most: practical advice for competing in the global economy. But it does remind executives to pry their gaze from the present and set it firmly on the future. As Heisenberg well understood, the more doggedly you map where a moving target is, the less you know about where it's headed.-Gardiner Morse
Harvard Business Review's Review of The Next Global Stage The Next Global Stage:Challenges and Opportunities in Our Borderless World Kenichi Ohmae (Wharton School Publishing, 2005) In the early 1900s, German physicist Werner Heisenberg laid the foundations for quantum mechanics, a set of rules showing that at the subatomic level Newtonian physics was irrelevant. Just as quantum mechanics upstaged Newton, says strategist Kenichi Ohmae, a radical new model is upending old notions about the global economy. In this sprawling book, Ohmae warns that governments, businesses, and leaders that cling to their Newtonian approaches will become irrelevant themselves. The heart of Ohmae's thesis will be familiar to readers of his previous books, includingThe Borderless World(1990) andThe Invisible Continent(2000): In the new global economy, the nation-state, and the protectionist economic thinking that goes with it, is obsolete. Nation-states have borders, armies, flags, currencies, and a development-stifling instinct to protect their economies from the outside world. As global economic players, they're being displaced by "region states"-borderless centers of vibrant economic activity that welcome global trade and investment, like the Shutoken metropolitan area of Japan and Guangzhou in China. If the rules of the old economy no longer apply, Ohmae ventures, then neither do the old rules of business. Fair enough. The problem is, he says, no one knows, or can know, what the new rules are: "By the time any rule book or user's manual appears...the 'new rules'will already be obsolete." What business leaders can be sure of, Ohmae argues, is that massive change without requires massive change within. That means wall-to-wall rethinking of corporate mission, strategy, and organization. Companies must cut loose from their "ancestry" and, for instance, compete by selling the very products that threaten them. Clinging to the core, as Kodak did in the face of predation by digital-camera makers, is a recipe for failure in this new age. Companies must cast off their sentimental attachment to the nation-states where they're headquartered and jettison their hierarchies and old approaches to markets. Their leaders must become visionary facilitators without preconceived attitudes about their roles-ready to embrace even the idea that the best leader may be a team, not an individual. There can be no half measures in this radical transformation, Ohmae says, no testing the waters before taking the plunge. It's a strong prescription. Unfortunately, this lively book can't, by its own admission, give business readers what they want most: practical advice for competing in the global economy. But it does remind executives to pry their gaze from the present and set it firmly on the future. As Heisenberg well understood, the more doggedly you map where a moving target is, the less you know about where it's headed. -Gardiner Morse
Harvard Business Review's Review of The Next Global Stage The Next Global Stage:Challenges and Opportunities in Our Borderless World Kenichi Ohmae (Wharton School Publishing, 2005) In the early 1900s, German physicist Werner Heisenberg laid the foundations for quantum mechanics, a set of rules showing that at the subatomic level Newtonian physics was irrelevant. Just as quantum mechanics upstaged Newton, says strategist Kenichi Ohmae, a radical new model is upending old notions about the global economy. In this sprawling book, Ohmae warns that governments, businesses, and leaders that cling to their Newtonian approaches will become irrelevant themselves. The heart of Ohmae's thesis will be familiar to readers of his previous books, including The Borderless World (1990) and The Invisible Continent (2000): In the new global economy, the nation-state, and the protectionist economic thinking that goes with it, is obsolete. Nation-states have borders, armies, flags, currencies, and a development-stifling instinct to protect their economies from the outside world. As global economic players, they're being displaced by "region states"-borderless centers of vibrant economic activity that welcome global trade and investment, like the Shutoken metropolitan area of Japan and Guangzhou in China. If the rules of the old economy no longer apply, Ohmae ventures, then neither do the old rules of business. Fair enough. The problem is, he says, no one knows, or can know, what the new rules are: "By the time any rule book or user's manual appears...the 'new rules' will already be obsolete." What business leaders can be sure of, Ohmae argues, is that massive change without requires massive change within. That means wall-to-wall rethinking of corporate mission, strategy, and organization. Companies must cut loose from their "ancestry" and, for instance, compete by selling the very products that threaten them. Clinging to the core, as Kodak did in the face of predation by digital-camera makers, is a recipe for failure in this new age. Companies must cast off their sentimental attachment to the nation-states where they're headquartered and jettison their hierarchies and old approaches to markets. Their leaders must become visionary facilitators without preconceived attitudes about their roles-ready to embrace even the idea that the best leader may be a team, not an individual. There can be no half measures in this radical transformation, Ohmae says, no testing the waters before taking the plunge. It's a strong prescription. Unfortunately, this lively book can't, by its own admission, give business readers what they want most: practical advice for competing in the global economy. But it does remind executives to pry their gaze from the present and set it firmly on the future. As Heisenberg well understood, the more doggedly you map where a moving target is, the less you know about where it's headed. -Gardiner Morse
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Summaries
Long Description
The future takes shape! Preview tomorrow's global economy... and the new rules for politics, business, and personal success. - Beyond the nation-state: towards a world driven by regional states and economic 'platforms'.- Why yesterday's economic theories no longer work: the accelerating power of complexity in today's global economy.- New ways to prepare for success on the global stage -- in your business, and in your life.
Main Description
A radically new world is taking shape from the ashes of yesterday's nation-based economic world. To succeed, you'll need to act on a global stage - and master entirely new rules about the sources of economic power and the drivers of growth. In The Global Stage, legendary business strategist Kenichi Ohmae synthesizes today's emerging trends into the first coherent view of tomorrow's global economy, and its implications for politics, business, and personal success. As important as Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating and relevant as Friedman's The Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's happened: it prepares you for what will happen next.
Long Description
Globalization is a fact. You can't stop it; it has already happened; it is here to stay. and we are moving into a new global stage. A radically new world is taking shape from the ashes of yesterday's nation-based economic world. To succeed, you must act on the global stage, leveraging radically new drivers of economic power and growth. Legendary business strategist Kenichi Ohmaewho in The Borderless World, published in 1990, predicted the rise and success of globalization, coining the very wordsynthesizes today's emerging trends into the first coherent view of tomorrow's global economyand its implications for politics, business, and personal success. Ohmae explores the dynamics of the new "region state," tomorrow's most potent economic institution, and demonstrates how China is rapidly becoming the exemplar of this new economic paradigm. The Next Global Stage offers a practical blueprint for businesses, governments, and individuals who intend to thrive in this new environment. Ohmae concludes with a detailed look at strategy in an era where it's tougher to define competitors, companies, and customers than ever before. As important as Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating as Friedman's The Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's already happened: It offers a roadmap for action in the world that's beginning to emerge. New economics for a borderless world Why Keynes' and Milton Friedman's economics are historyand what might replace them Leveraging today's most powerful platforms for growth From Windows to English to your global brand Technology: driving business deathand rebirth Anticipating technological obsolescenceand jumping ahead of it Government in the post-national era What government can do when nation-states don't matter Leadership and strategy on the global stage Honing your global vision and global leadership skills
Back Cover Copy
Globalization's a done deal. The big question is: What comes next? In The Next Global Stage, Kenichi Ohmae reveals the post-globalized world-and shows what it'll take to succeed there, as a company, a nation, and as an individual. Ohmae shows why yesterday's economic theories are collapsing, and illuminates a new world driven by "region states" and new economic platforms, not traditional nations or traditional economics. He offers powerful insights into the implications of unprecedented complexity...tomorrow's new work and geographical growth centers...the emerging global tribe of "net-ians," and the role of leaders in a truly borderless world. As important as Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating as Friedman's The Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's already happened: It offers a roadmap for action in the world that's beginning to emerge. * Radically new rules for politics, business, and personal success * Leveraging tomorrow's potent new drivers of growth and economic power * The fall of the nation-state-and what's replacing it * Strategy and leadership in the truly borderless economy * A must-read for every executive, business planner, policymaker, and citizen.
Back Cover Copy
Globalization is a fact. You can't stop it; it has already happened; it is here to stay. And we are moving into a new global stage. A radically new world is taking shape from the ashes of yesterday's nation-based economic world. To succeed, you must act on the global stage, leveraging radically new drivers of economic power and growth. Legendary business strategist Kenichi Ohmae-who inThe Borderless World, published in 1990, predicted the rise and success of globalization, coining the very word-synthesizes today's emerging trends into the first coherent view of tomorrow's global economy-and its implications for politics, business, and personal success. Ohmae explores the dynamics of the new "region state," tomorrow's most potent economic institution, and demonstrates how China is rapidly becoming the exemplar of this new economic paradigm.The Next Global Stageoffers a practical blueprint for businesses, governments, and individuals who intend to thrive in this new environment. Ohmae concludes with a detailed look at strategy in an era where it's tougher to define competitors, companies, and customers than ever before. As important as Huntington'sThe Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating as Friedman'sThe Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's already happened: It offers a roadmap for action in the world that's beginning to emerge. New economics for a borderless world Why Keynes'and Milton Friedman's economics arehistory-and what might replace them Leveraging today's most powerful platforms for growth From Windows to English to your global brand Technology: driving business death-and rebirth Anticipating technological obsolescence-and jumping ahead of it Government in the post-national era What government can do when nation-states don't matter Leadership and strategy on the global stage Honing your global vision and global leadership skills
Back Cover Copy
Globalization is a fact. You can't stop it; it has already happened; it is here to stay. And we are moving into a new global stage.A radically new world is taking shape from the ashes of yesterday's nation-based economic world. To succeed, you must act on the global stage, leveraging radically new drivers of economic power and growth. Legendary business strategist Kenichi Ohmae-who in The Borderless World, published in 1990, predicted the rise and success of globalization, coining the very word-synthesizes today's emerging trends into the first coherent view of tomorrow's global economy-and its implications for politics, business, and personal success.Ohmae explores the dynamics of the new "region state," tomorrow's most potent economic institution, and demonstrates how China is rapidly becoming the exemplar of this new economic paradigm. The Next Global Stage offers a practical blueprint for businesses, governments, and individuals who intend to thrive in this new environment. Ohmae concludes with a detailed look at strategy in an era where it's tougher to define competitors, companies, and customers than ever before.As important as Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating as Friedman's The Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's already happened: It offers a roadmap for action in the world that's beginning to emerge.-New economics for a borderless worldWhy Keynes' and Milton Friedman's economics are history-and what might replace them-Leveraging today's most powerful platforms for growthFrom Windows to English to your global brand-Technology: driving business death-and rebirthAnticipating technological obsolescence-and jumping ahead of it-Government in the post-national eraWhat government can do when nation-states don't matter-Leadership and strategy on the global stageHoning your global vision and global leadership skills
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring the dynamics of the 'region state', and demonstrating how China is becoming the exemplar of this economic paradigm, this work offers a practical blueprint for businesses, governments, and individuals who intend to thrive in this environment.
Back Cover Copy
Globalization is a fact. You can't stop it; it has already happened; it is here to stay. And we are moving into a new global stage. A radically new world is taking shape from the ashes of yesterday's nation-based economic world. To succeed, you must act on the global stage, leveraging radically new drivers of economic power and growth. Legendary business strategist Kenichi Ohmae--who in The Borderless World, published in 1990, predicted the rise and success of globalization, coining the very word--synthesizes today's emerging trends into the first coherent view of tomorrow's global economy--and its implications for politics, business, and personal success. Ohmae explores the dynamics of the new "region state," tomorrow's most potent economic institution, and demonstrates how China is rapidly becoming the exemplar of this new economic paradigm. The Next Global Stageoffers a practical blueprint for businesses, governments, and individuals who intend to thrive in this new environment. Ohmae concludes with a detailed look at strategy in an era where it's tougher to define competitors, companies, and customers than ever before. As important as Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating as Friedman's The Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's already happened: It offers a roadmap for action in the world that's beginning to emerge. New economics for a borderless world Why Keynes' and Milton Friedman's economics are history--and what might replace them Leveraging today's most powerful platforms for growth From Windows to English to your global brand Technology: driving business death--and rebirth Anticipating technological obsolescence--and jumping ahead of it Government in the post-national era What government can do when nation-states don't matter Leadership and strategy on the global stage Honing your global vision and global leadership skills
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Plot
The Stage
The World Tour
The Curtain Rises
The World as a Stage
A Speedy Global Tour
Meanwhile in Ireland
Finland: In from the Cold
What Is the Global Economy?
Borderless
Invisible
Cyber-Connected
Measured in Multiples
Opening Night
The World AG
Leading the Dinosaur
The View From the Hotel: Detroit
Busting the Budget
Gates to the Future
14 AG: China
Putting an "e" in Christmas
The End of Economics
Reinventing Economics
Economic Theories That Once Fitted the Times
New Fundamentals Require New Thinking
Turning the Taps On and Off
Deflation and the GDP Deflator
Interests Rates and Nest Eggs
Can Physics Help?
A Complex World
The Curve Ball
Oscillating Wildly
Paradigm II
The Power of Politics
The Difficulty of Changing Habits
Uncle Sam Goes Global
The New Economic Paradigm
Stage Directions
Playmakers
Finding Your Bearings on the Global Stage
How Nation-States Retard Economic Development
The Nation-State Fetish
Strong States
The Rise of the Region
Defining the Region-State
Indian Summers
Carried Away in China
Not All Regions Are Created Equal
Surprising China
Microregions
Flexibility
Size and Scale Matter, But Not in a Traditional Way
Regions Are Gaining Their Deserved Recognition
Practical Considerations
What a Successful Region Has to Do
Branding Places
The Will to Succeed
Organizing Regions
Other Unions
Free Trade Area or Fortress?
Platforms for Progress
Relentlessly Forward
Developing Technology Platforms
Language as Platform
English Inc
The Platform Profusion
Other Platforms
Out and About
Border Crossings
Technology: The Fairy Godmother
BPO: India as a Launch Pad
Dormant India
More Than a One-Country Wonder
BPO as a Platform
Home Sweet Home
Myths and Half-Truths
The View from India
Reaping the Benefits
BPO in a Borderless World
Breaking the Chains
The Portal Revolution
The Search
Have You Been Googled Recently?
Paying the Bill: The Payment Revolution
On the Rails
Delivery: The Logistics Revolution
The Arrival of the Micro Tag
Cool Chains and Fresh Food
Deliverance
Using Logistics to Solve Bigger Problems
For Dinner
The Script
Reinventing Government
Disappearing Power
Beyond Distribution
Size Matters
Downsizing and Resizing
A Vision for Change
The Japanese Vision
Mapping the Future
Visions Versus Mirages
Government Vision
Getting Noticed
Only Educate
Closing Down Distance
A New Role for Government
China: Governing the Ungovernable
Malaysia's Corridors of Power
Singapore's Appetite for Reinvention
Swedish Rhapsody
The Craic of the Irish
The Futures Market
All Change
The Technological Future
Technological Progress Means Death Is a Fact of Business Life
The Rise of VoIP and Its Impact on Telecoms
Join the March Early
The Personal Future
Embrace Leadership
Value Information and Innovation
Embrace Flexibility
The Corporate Future
The Homeless Corporation
Innovation, Inc
The Adaptive Corporation
Beyond Hierarchy
The Next Stage
The Regional Future
Hainan Island
Petropavlosk-Kamchatsily, Russia
Vancouver and British Columbia
Estonia
The Baltic Corner
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Khabarovsk, Maritime (Primorye) Province and Sakhalin Island, Russia
São Paulo, Brazil
Kyushu, Japan
Postscript
Reopening the Mind of the Strategist
Beyond the Daydream
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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