Catalogue


Making the white man's Indian : native Americans and Hollywood movies /
Angela Aleiss.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2005.
description
xix, 211 p. : ill.
ISBN
027598396X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2005.
isbn
027598396X (alk. paper)
contents note
Hollywood and the silent American, p. 11 -- A cultural division, p. 48 -- Indian adventures and interracial romances, p. 81 -- War and its Indian allies, p. 115 -- Red becomes white, p. 156 -- A shattered illusion, p. 193 -- Savagery on the frontier, p. 220 -- Beyond the western, p. 267 -- Conclusion, p. 310 -- Appendix A: motion pictures screened, p. 316. -- Appendix B: Motion picture archives, p. 325.
catalogue key
5427028
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Angela Aleiss is a former teaching fellow at UCLA's American Indian Studies Center, and currently teaches at California State University, Long Beach
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-12-01:
The literature includes dozens of books on the Hollywood Western, and perhaps a dozen just on the representation of Native Americans in Hollywood film. Among the latter one finds no one definitive study, although Armando Jose Prats' Invisible Natives: Myth and Identity in the American Western (CH, Apr'03, 40-4508) offers the most ambitious theoretical approach. Several others provide substantial rewards: Michael Hilger's From Savage to Nobleman (1995) offers a thorough filmography with brief critical descriptions and plot summaries; Hollywood's Indian, ed. by Peter Rollins and John O'Connor (CH, Sep'98, 36-0222), collects a wide range of focused, intelligent essays; and Jacquelyn Kilpatrick's Celluloid Indians (CH, Mar'00, 37-3829) starts its survey with Edison's films and continues to the present day. Aleiss (California State Univ., Long Beach) goes over many of the same films the others do, of course, but with much more emphasis on studio production. The best sections depend on research in studio archives, and the footnotes and bibliography direct the reader to manuscript collections where further research projects await. Aleiss's book is modest in terms of interpretation (in contrast to Invisible Natives), but the writing and research are scrupulous and engaging. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers. S. C. Dillon Bates College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The literature includes dozens of books on the Hollywood Western, and perhaps a dozen just on the representation of Native Americans in Hollywood film....Ýt¨he writing and research are scrupulous and engaging. Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers."-Choice
"The literature includes dozens of books on the Hollywood Western, and perhaps a dozen just on the representation of Native Americans in Hollywood film....[t]he writing and research are scrupulous and engaging. Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers." - Choice
'œWhile Aleiss's book is a serious study, it is lively and very readable, full of little-known facts and anecdotes that add interest to its analysis....[M]aking the White Man's Indian is a useful addition for most libraries.'' Multicultural Review
"While Aleiss's book is a serious study, it is lively and very readable, full of little-known facts and anecdotes that add interest to its analysis....[M]aking the White Man's Indian is a useful addition for most libraries."- Multicultural Review
'While Aleiss's book is a serious study, it is lively and very readable, full of little-known facts and anecdotes that add interest to its analysis....[M]aking the White Man's Indian is a useful addition for most libraries.'-Multicultural Review
"While Aleiss's book is a serious study, it is lively and very readable, full of little-known facts and anecdotes that add interest to its analysis....ÝM¨aking the White Man's Indian is a useful addition for most libraries."-Multicultural Review
"While Aleiss's book is a serious study, it is lively and very readable, full of little-known facts and anecdotes that add interest to its analysis.... [M]aking the White Man's Indian is a useful addition for most libraries." - Multicultural Review
"Aleiss is to be commended for providing a clear-eyed, level-headed and marvelously researched film history that explores the tangled and too frequently shameful treatment of Native Americans on the nation's screens over the past century. She takes the American film industry, warts and all, for what it is as a commercial enterprise largely under the aegis of corporate capitalism. She has illuminated a problematic page of American film history with clarity and brio."
"Aleiss is to be commended for providing a clear-eyed, level-headed and marvelously researched film history that explores the tangled and too frequently shameful treatment of Native Americans on the nation's screens over the past century. She takes the American film industry, warts and all, for what it is as a commercial enterprise largely under the aegis of corporate capitalism. She has illuminated a problematic page of American film history with clarity and brio." - Andrew Sarris, Film Critic New York Observer
'œThe literature includes dozens of books on the Hollywood Western, and perhaps a dozen just on the representation of Native Americans in Hollywood film....[t]he writing and research are scrupulous and engaging. Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers.'' Choice
'œ[D]raws on behind-the-scenes material such as correspondence, evolving scripts, studio publicity materials, reactions from film critics and Native American groups, and records of the self-censorship organization, to cast new light on the portrayal of Native Americans in US films.'' Reference & Research Book News
"[D]raws on behind-the-scenes material such as correspondence, evolving scripts, studio publicity materials, reactions from film critics and Native American groups, and records of the self-censorship organization, to cast new light on the portrayal of Native Americans in US films."- Reference & Research Book News
"[D]raws on behind-the-scenes material such as correspondence, evolving scripts, studio publicity materials, reactions from film critics and Native American groups, and records of the self-censorship organization, to cast new light on the portrayal of Native Americans in US films."-Reference & Research Book News
"ÝD¨raws on behind-the-scenes material such as correspondence, evolving scripts, studio publicity materials, reactions from film critics and Native American groups, and records of the self-censorship organization, to cast new light on the portrayal of Native Americans in US films."-Reference & Research Book News
'[D]raws on behind-the-scenes material such as correspondence, evolving scripts, studio publicity materials, reactions from film critics and Native American groups, and records of the self-censorship organization, to cast new light on the portrayal of Native Americans in US films.'-Reference & Research Book News/Art Book News Annual
"[D]raws on behind-the-scenes material such as correspondence, evolving scripts, studio publicity materials, reactions from film critics and Native American groups, and records of the self-censorship organization, to cast new light on the portrayal of Native Americans in US films." - Reference & Research Book News/Art Book News Annual
'œMaking the White Man's Indian reminds us that films were made to make money and that they reflected whatever niche Indians occupied in the American attitude toward Indians and minorities at the time the films were made. Professor Aleiss explains why Hollywood representation of Indians has swung back and forth between the Indian-as-savage and the Indian-as-noble and sympathetic. Portraying Indians as people is not new....Hollywood may shape images but it responds in a cultural context. Her reviews of many obscure or forgotten films are a bonus....[b]elongs in the mainstream of current interpretations of Indian representations.'' NDO North Dakota Quarterly
"Making the White Man's Indian reminds us that films were made to make money and that they reflected whatever niche Indians occupied in the American attitude toward Indians and minorities at the time the films were made. Professor Aleiss explains why Hollywood representation of Indians has swung back and forth between the Indian-as-savage and the Indian-as-noble and sympathetic. Portraying Indians as people is not new....Hollywood may shape images but it responds in a cultural context. Her reviews of many obscure or forgotten films are a bonus....[b]elongs in the mainstream of current interpretations of Indian representations."- NDO North Dakota Quarterly
"The literature includes dozens of books on the Hollywood Western, and perhaps a dozen just on the representation of Native Americans in Hollywood film....[t]he writing and research are scrupulous and engaging. Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers."- Choice
'The literature includes dozens of books on the Hollywood Western, and perhaps a dozen just on the representation of Native Americans in Hollywood film....[t]he writing and research are scrupulous and engaging. Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers.'-Choice
'Making the White Man's Indian reminds us that films were made to make money and that they reflected whatever niche Indians occupied in the American attitude toward Indians and minorities at the time the films were made. Professor Aleiss explains why Hollywood representation of Indians has swung back and forth between the Indian-as-savage and the Indian-as-noble and sympathetic. Portraying Indians as people is not new....Hollywood may shape images but it responds in a cultural context. Her reviews of many obscure or forgotten films are a bonus....[b]elongs in the mainstream of current interpretations of Indian representations.'-NDO North Dakota Quarterly
" Making the White Man's Indian reminds us that films were made to make money and that they reflected whatever niche Indians occupied in the American attitude toward Indians and minorities at the time the films were made. Professor Aleiss explains why Hollywood representation of Indians has swung back and forth between the Indian-as-savage and the Indian-as-noble and sympathetic. Portraying Indians as people is not new....Hollywood may shape images but it responds in a cultural context. Her reviews of many obscure or forgotten films are a bonus....[b]elongs in the mainstream of current interpretations of Indian representations." - NDO North Dakota Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Short Annotation
The image in Hollywood movies of savage Indians attacking white settlers represents only one side of a very complicated picture.
Unpaid Annotation
In this new study, author Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans as portrayed in film, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files, and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters. Behind-the-scenes anecdotes of filmmakers and Native Americans, as well as rare archival photographs, supplement the discussion, which often shows a stark contrast between depiction and reality.
Long Description
The image in Hollywood movies of savage Indians attacking white settlers represents only one side of a very complicated picture. In fact sympathetic portrayals of Native Americans stood alongside those of hostile Indians in the silent films of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, and flourished during the early 1930s with Hollywood's cycle of pro-Indian adventures. Decades later, the stereotype became even more complicated, as films depicted the savagery of whites ( The SearcherS≪/i>) in contrast to the more peaceful Indian ( Broken Arrow). By 1990 the release of Dances with WolveS≪/i> appeared to have recycled the romantic and savage portrayals embedded in early cinema. In this new study, author Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans on the silver screen, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files, and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters. Behind-the-scenes anecdotes of filmmakers and Native Americans, as well as rare archival photographs, supplement the discussion, which often shows a stark contrast between depiction and reality. The book traces chronologically the development of the Native American's screen image while also examining many forgotten or lost Western films. Each chapter will feature black and white stills from the films discussed.
Long Description
The image in Hollywood movies of savage Indians attacking white settlers represents only one side of a very complicated picture. In fact sympathetic portrayals of Native Americans stood alongside those of hostile Indians in the silent films of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, and flourished during the early 1930s with Hollywood's cycle of pro-Indian adventures. Decades later, the stereotype became even more complicated, as films depicted the savagery of whites ( The Searchers) in contrast to the more peaceful Indian ( Broken Arrow). By 1990 the release of Dances with Wolves appeared to have recycled the romantic and savage portrayals embedded in early cinema. In this new study, author Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans on the silver screen, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files, and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters. Behind-the-scenes anecdotes of filmmakers and Native Americans, as well as rare archival photographs, supplement the discussion, which often shows a stark contrast between depiction and reality. The book traces chronologically the development of the Native American's screen image while also examining many forgotten or lost Western films. Each chapter will feature black and white stills from the films discussed.
Long Description
The image in Hollywood movies of savage Indians attacking white settlers represents only one side of a very complicated picture. In fact sympathetic portrayals of Native Americans stood alongside those of hostile Indians in the silent films of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, and flourished during the early 1930s with Hollywood's cycle of pro-Indian adventures. Decades later, the stereotype became even more complicated, as films depicted the savagery of whites (The Searchers) in contrast to the more "peaceful" Indian (Broken Arrow). By 1990 the release of Dances with Wolves appeared to have recycled the romantic and savage portrayals embedded in early cinema. In this new study, author Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans on the silver screen, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files, and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters. Behind-the-scenes anecdotes of filmmakers and Native Americans, as well as rare archival photographs, supplement the discussion, which often shows a stark contrast between depiction and reality. The book traces chronologically the development of the Native American's screen image while also examining many forgotten or "lost" Western films. Each chapter will feature black and white stills from the films discussed.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans in the cinema, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters.
Long Description
The image in Hollywood movies of savage Indians attacking white settlers represents only one side of a very complicated picture. In fact sympathetic portrayals of Native Americans stood alongside those of hostile Indians in the silent films of D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, and flourished during the early 1930s with Hollywood's cycle of pro-Indian adventures. Decades later, the stereotype became even more complicated, as films depicted the savagery of whites (The Searchers) in contrast to the more "peaceful" Indian (Broken Arrow). By 1990, the release of Dances with Wolves appeared to have recycled the romantic and savage portrayals embedded in early cinema. In this new study, author Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans on the silver screen, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files, and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters. Behind-the-scenes anecdotes of filmmakers and Native Americans, as well as rare archival photographs, supplement the discussion, which often shows a stark contrast between depiction and reality.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. xv
Hollywood and the Silent Americanp. 1
A Cultural Divisionp. 19
Indian Adventures and Interracial Romancesp. 39
War and Its Indian Alliesp. 59
Red Becomes Whitep. 81
A Shattered Illusionp. 101
Savagery on the Frontierp. 119
Beyond the Westernp. 141
Conclusionp. 163
Motion Pictures Screenedp. 167
Motion Picture Archivesp. 173
Notesp. 175
Selected Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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