Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Governing Soviet journalism : the press and the socialist person after Stalin /
Thomas C. Wolfe.
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2005.
description
xxi, 240 p.
ISBN
0253345898 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2005.
isbn
0253345898 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Journalism and the person in the Soviet sixties -- Agranovskii's essays -- Journalism against socialism, socialism against journalism -- Perestroika and the end of government by journalism -- Teaching tabloids.
catalogue key
5406338
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-12-01:
One of the author's purposes is to reveal that the Soviet press was more than propaganda. Consequently, he emphasizes its educational function. Wolfe (Univ. of Minnesota) approaches the Soviet press from a Foucaultist premise and is on the right track, pointing out that the function of the press, regardless of the ideological system, is to service the state. This is not to say that since the governments are different, that the presses in many particulars would not also be different. For example, the Soviets did not have a secondary press that was free of corporate influences. Regretfully, Wolfe has limited his study to the late Soviet press from the time of Brezhnev to Gorbachev's perestroika, when the Soviet state paradigm began to peter out. The work is well footnoted and contains an extensive bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. College and research libraries. A. Ezergailis Ithaca College
Reviews
Review Quotes
[Draws] on recent theories of media and communication [and] also deserves to be read as one of the most compelling arguments available for the utility of the Foucauldian concept of governmentality. The importance of attending to the ways in which different kinds of modern subjects have been shaped through the regulation of the 'conduct of conduct' are nowhere more effectively and lucidly explored than here....
"[Draws] on recent theories of media and communication [and] also deserves to be read as one of the most compelling arguments available for the utility of the Foucauldian concept of governmentality. The importance of attending to the ways in which different kinds of modern subjects have been shaped through the regulation of the 'conduct of conduct' are nowhere more effectively and lucidly explored than here...." -- Douglas Rogers, Miami University, Kritika : Explorations Russian & Eurasian History, Vol. 7.3 2006
"[Draws] on recent theories of media and communication [and] also deserves to be read as one of the most compelling arguments available for the utility of the Foucauldian concept of governmentality. The importance of attending to the ways in which different kinds of modern subjects have been shaped through the regulation of the 'conduct of conduct' are nowhere more effectively and lucidly explored than here...." -Douglas Rogers, Miami University, Kritika : Explorations Russian & Eurasian History, Vol. 7.3 2006
... Governing Soviet Journalism offers an interesting narrative of the stance of the press across different periods. The material from the former party archive is particularly interesting...
"... Governing Soviet Journalism offers an interesting narrative of the stance of the press across different periods. The material from the former party archive is particularly interesting..." -- Journal of Cold War Studies
"... Governing Soviet Journalism offers an interesting narrative of the stance of the press across different periods. The material from the former party archive is particularly interesting..." -Journal of Cold War Studies
"One of the author's purposes is to reveal that the Soviet press was more than propaganda. Consequently, he emphasizes its educational function. Wolfe (Univ. of Minnesota) approaches the Soviet press from a Foucaultist premise and is on the right track, pointing out that the function of the press, regardless of the ideological system, is to service the state. This is not to say that since the governments are different, that the presses in many particulars would not also be different. For example, the Soviets did not have a secondary press that was free of corporate influences. Regretfully, Wolfe has limited his study to the late Soviet press from the time of Brezhnev to Gorbachev's perestroika, when the Soviet state paradigm began to peter out. The work is well footnoted and contains an extensivebibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. College and research libraries. -- A. Ezergailis, Ithaca College" -- Choice, December 2006
"One of the author's purposes is to reveal that the Soviet press was more than propaganda. Consequently, he emphasizes its educational function. Wolfe (Univ. of Minnesota) approaches the Soviet press from a Foucaultist premise and is on the right track, pointing out that the function of the press, regardless of the ideological system, is to service the state. This is not to say that since the governments are different, that the presses in many particulars would not also be different. For example, the Soviets did not have a secondary press that was free of corporate influences. Regretfully, Wolfe has limited his study to the late Soviet press from the time of Brezhnev to Gorbachev's perestroika, when the Soviet state paradigm began to peter out. The work is well footnoted and contains an extensivebibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. College and research libraries.-A. Ezergailis, Ithaca College" -Choice, December 2006
... Recommended. College and research libraries.
"... Recommended. College and research libraries." -- Choice
"... Recommended. College and research libraries." -Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Soviet project of creating a new culture and society entailed a plan for the modeling of "new" persons who embodied and fulfilled the promise of socialism, and this vision was expressed in the institutions of government. Using archival sources, essays, and interviews with journalists, Thomas C. Wolfe provides an account of the final four decades of Soviet history viewed through the lens of journalism and media. Whereas most studies of the Soviet press approach its history in terms of propaganda or ideology, Wolfe's focus is on the effort to imagine a different kind of person and polity. Foucault's concept of governmentality illuminates the relationship between the idea of the socialist person and everyday journalistic representation, from the Khrushchev period to the 1990s and the appearance of the tabloid press. This thought-provoking study provides insights into the institutions of the Soviet press and the lives of journalists who experienced important transformations of their work.
Main Description
The Soviet project of creating a new culture and society entailed a plan for the model-ing of "new" persons who embodied and fulfilled the promise of socialism, and this vision was expressed in the institutions of government. Using archival sources, essays, and interviews with journalists, Thomas C. Wolfe provides an account of the final four decades of Soviet history viewed through the lens of journalism and media. Whereas most studies of the Soviet press approach its history in terms of propaganda or ideology, Wolfe's focus is on the effort to imagine a different kind of person and polity. Foucault's concept of governmentality illuminates the relationship between the idea of the socialist person and everyday journalistic representation, from the Khrushchev period to the 1990s and the appearance of the tabloid press. This thought-provoking study provides insights into the institutions of the Soviet press and the lives of journal-ists who experienced important transformations of their work. Thomas C. Wolfe is Assistant Professor of History and Anthropology and in the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.
Main Description
The Soviet project of creating a new culture and society entailed a plan for the model-ingof "new" persons who embodied and fulfilled the promise of socialism, and thisvision was expressed in the institutions of government. Using archival sources, essays,and interviews with journalists, Thomas C. Wolfe provides an account of the final fourdecades of Soviet history viewed through the lens of journalism and media. Whereasmost studies of the Soviet press approach its history in terms of propaganda or ideology,Wolfe's focus is on the effort to imagine a different kind of person and polity.Foucault's concept of governmentality illuminates the relationship between the idea ofthe socialist person and everyday journalistic representation, from the Khrushchevperiod to the 1990s and the appearance of the tabloid press. This thought-provokingstudy provides insights into the institutions of the Soviet press and the lives of journal-istswho experienced important transformations of their work.Thomas C. Wolfe is Assistant Professor of History and Anthropology and in theInstitute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.
Table of Contents
Journalism and the person in the Soviet sixtiesp. 33
Agranovskii's essaysp. 71
Journalism against socialism, socialism against journalismp. 104
Perestroika and the end of government by journalismp. 143
Teaching tabloidsp. 176
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem