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The birth of a great power system, 1740-1815 /
H.M. Scott.
imprint
Harlow, England ; Toronto : Pearson Longman, 2006.
description
xiv, 433 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0582217172 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow, England ; Toronto : Pearson Longman, 2006.
isbn
0582217172 (pbk.)
catalogue key
5396800
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [378]-409) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-06-01:
Nobody knows more about the diplomacy of the 18th century than Hamish Scott. The Rise of the Great Powers, 1648-1815 (with Derek McKay, CH, Dec'83) was the first of several books that combined clear prose with an encyclopedic grasp of diplomatic daily life. Scott focuses here on the uncommon conjuncture of 1740-1815, which marks the emergence of readily identifiable great powers that would remain essentially unchanged (with the marginal exception of Italy) through the end of WW I. The outbreak of the Silesian Wars added Prussia and Russia to the existing troika of Austria, France, and Great Britain, followed by the Ottoman Empire at the end of the century. At the same time, other countries' receding power and ambition made it easy to distinguish between truly great and former contenders such as the Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden and the previously pretentious principalities of Germany and Italy. Paul Schroeder's work deeply influenced Scott's conceptualization in the special quality Scott affords to Russia and Great Britain as "flanking powers." Schroeder similarly influenced Scott's emphasis on a new, supremely stable state system by 1815 that emphasized the maintenance of a great-power "equilibrium" relying on consensus reached through negotiation rather than on the brutal calculus of the balance of power. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. Ingrao Purdue University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a clear and interesting contribution not only to work on the history of European international relations but also to the theory that this subject is best approached in terms of a system..."This is a useful book that, within its particular parameters, is the best available."Jeremy Black, The Times Higher, February 24 2006.
"...a clear and interesting contribution not only to work on the history of European international relations but also to the theory that this subject is best approached in terms of a system..."This is a useful book that, within its particular parameters, is the best available." Jeremy Black, The Times Higher, February 24 2006.
"...a clear and interesting contribution not only to work on the history of European international relations but also to the theory that this subject is best approached in terms of a system..."This is a useful book that, within its particular parameters, is the best available." Jeremy Black, The Times Higher, February 24 2006.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2006
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"Scotts serene command of an enormous array of facts and remarkable skill at integrating them into a smooth, readable, and convincing narrative and analysis make the work indispensable for mature scholars and students alike."Paul W. Schroeder, Professor of History and Political Science (emeritus), Universityof Illinois "This happy marriage of lucid narrative and penetrating analysis has created a modern classic."Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History, University of Cambridge "The Birth of a Great Power System, 17401815" examines a key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive state system. H.M. Scott demonstrates how the well-known and dramatic events of these decades the emergence of Russia and Prussia; the three partitions of Poland; the continuing retreat of the Ottoman Empire; the unprecedented territorial expansion of Revolutionary and Napoleonic France, halted by the final defeat of Napoleon were part of a wider process that created the modern great power system, dominated by Europes five leading states. Enhanced by maps and a chronology of principal events, this comprehensive and accessible textbook is fully up-to-date in its coverage of recent scholarship. Unlike many other treatments of this period, Scott extends his beyond the French Revolution of 1789 in order to demonstrate how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history. This book addresses "the "crucial phase in the emergence of the modern international system which, with the subsequent addition of the USA, Japan and Russia, has prevaileduntil the present day. H.M. Scott is Professor of International History at the University of St Andrews. He is a leading authority on eighteenth century international relations. His previous books include "The Emergence of the Eastern Powers 17561775 "(2001).
Back Cover Copy
Scott¿s serene command of an enormous array of facts and remarkable skill at integrating them into a smooth, readable, and convincing narrative and analysis make the work indispensable for mature scholars and students alike. Paul W. Schroeder, Professor of History and Political Science (emeritus), University of Illinois   This happy marriage of lucid narrative and penetrating analysis has created a modern classic. Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History, University of Cambridge     The Birth of a Great Power System, 1740¿1815 examines a key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive state system.   H.M. Scott demonstrates how the well-known and dramatic events of these decades ¿ the emergence of Russia and Prussia; the three partitions of Poland; the continuing retreat of the Ottoman Empire; the unprecedented territorial expansion of Revolutionary and Napoleonic France, halted by the final defeat of Napoleon ¿ were part of a wider process that created the modern great power system, dominated by Europe¿s five leading states.   Enhanced by maps and a chronology of principal events, this comprehensive and accessible textbook is fully up-to-date in its coverage of recent scholarship. Unlike many other treatments of this period, Scott extends his beyond the French Revolution of 1789 in order to demonstrate how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history.   This book addresses the crucial phase in the emergence of the modern international system which, with the subsequent addition of the USA, Japan and Russia, has prevailed until the present day.     H.M. Scott is Professor of International History at the University of St Andrews. He is a leading authority on eighteenth century international relations. His previous books include The Emergence of the Eastern Powers 1756¿1775 (2001).    
Back Cover Copy
Scotts serene command of an enormous array of facts and remarkable skill at integrating them into a smooth, readable, and convincing narrative and analysis make the work indispensable for mature scholars and students alike. Paul W. Schroeder, Professor of History and Political Science (emeritus), University of Illinois This happy marriage of lucid narrative and penetrating analysis has created a modern classic. Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History, University of Cambridge The Birth of a Great Power System, 17401815 examines a key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive state system. H.M. Scott demonstrates how the well-known and dramatic events of these decades the emergence of Russia and Prussia; the three partitions of Poland; the continuing retreat of the Ottoman Empire; the unprecedented territorial expansion of Revolutionary and Napoleonic France, halted by the final defeat of Napoleon were part of a wider process that created the modern great power system, dominated by Europes five leading states. Enhanced by maps and a chronology of principal events, this comprehensive and accessible textbook is fully up-to-date in its coverage of recent scholarship. Unlike many other treatments of this period, Scott extends his beyond the French Revolution of 1789 in order to demonstrate how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history. This book addresses the crucial phase in the emergence of the modern international system which, with the subsequent addition of the USA, Japan and Russia, has prevailed until the present day. H.M. Scott is Professor of International History at the University of St Andrews. He is a leading authority on eighteenth century international relations. His previous books include The Emergence of the Eastern Powers 17561775 (2001).
Back Cover Copy
Scott s serene command of an enormous array of facts and remarkable skill at integrating them into a smooth, readable, and convincing narrative and analysis make the work indispensable for mature scholars and students alike. Paul W. Schroeder, Professor of History and Political Science (emeritus), University of Illinois This happy marriage of lucid narrative and penetrating analysis has created a modern classic. Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History, University of Cambridge The Birth of a Great Power System, 1740 1815 examines a key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive state system. H.M. Scott demonstrates how the well-known and dramatic events of these decades the emergence of Russia and Prussia; the three partitions of Pol∧ the continuing retreat of the Ottoman Empire; the unprecedented territorial expansion of Revolutionary and Napoleonic France, halted by the final defeat of Napoleon were part of a wider process that created the modern great power system, dominated by Europe s five leading states. Enhanced by maps and a chronology of principal events, this comprehensive and accessible textbook is fully up-to-date in its coverage of recent scholarship. Unlike many other treatments of this period, Scott extends his beyond the French Revolution of 1789 in order to demonstrate how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history. This book addresses the crucial phase in the emergence of the modern international system which, with the subsequent addition of the USA, Japan and Russia, has prevailed until the present day. H.M. Scott is Professor of International History at the University of St Andrews. He is a leading authority on eighteenth century international relations. His previous books include The Emergence of the Eastern Powers 1756 1775 (2001).
Bowker Data Service Summary
Outlining the long-running rivalries that would shape international relations into the mid-19th century and beyond, Scott here provides the only up-to-date survey of these decisive events and changes.
Long Description
Outlining the long-running rivalries that shaped international relations into the mid-nineteenth century and beyond, this important new book provides an up-to-date survey of the decisive events and changes that gave birth to the European state system.   Unusual in extending across the divide usually represented by French Revolution of 1789, the book demonstrates how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history.   For undergraduates studying Modern European history.
Main Description
A study of the key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive great power system. Incorporates extensive recent scholarship Comprehensive geographical coverage - includes south-eastern, northern and eastern Europe Will be bought by students studying courses in European history and International Relations Contains lots of features to engage the reader, including a chronology of principal events, maps and a detailed bibliographic essay.
Main Description
A study of the key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive great power system. Incorporates extensive recent scholarship Comprehensive geographical coverage - includes south-eastern, northern and eastern Europe Will be bought by students studying courses in European history and International Relations Contains lots of features to engage the reader, including a chronology of principal events, maps and a detailed bibliographic essay.  
Main Description
Outlining the long-running rivalries that shaped international relations into the mid-nineteenth century and beyond, this important new book provides an up-to-date survey of the decisive events and changes that gave birth to the European state system. Unusual in extending across the divide usually represented by French Revolution of 1789, the book demonstrates how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history. For undergraduates studying Modern European history.
Main Description
Scott's serene command of an enormous array of facts and remarkable skill at integrating them into a smooth, readable, and convincing narrative and analysis make the work indispensable for mature scholars and students alike.Paul W. Schroeder, Professor of History and Political Science (emeritus), Universityof Illinois This happy marriage of lucid narrative and penetrating analysis has created a modern classic.Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History, University of Cambridge The Birth of a Great Power System, 17401815 examines a key development in modern European history: the origins and emergence of a competitive state system. H.M. Scott demonstrates how the well-known and dramatic events of these decades the emergence of Russia and Prussia; the three partitions of Pol∧ the continuing retreat of the Ottoman Empire; the unprecedented territorial expansion of Revolutionary and Napoleonic France, halted by the final defeat of Napoleon were part of a wider process that created the modern great power system, dominated by Europe's five leading states. Enhanced by maps and a chronology of principal events, this comprehensive and accessible textbook is fully up-to-date in its coverage of recent scholarship. Unlike many other treatments of this period, Scott extends his beyond the French Revolution of 1789 in order to demonstrate how events both before and after this great upheaval merged to produce the central political development in modern European history. This book addresses the crucial phase in the emergence of the modern international system which, with the subsequent addition of the USA, Japan and Russia, has prevailed until the present day. H.M. Scott is Professor of International History at the University of St Andrews. He is a leading authority on eighteenth century international relations. His previous books include The Emergence of the Eastern Powers 17561775 (2001).
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Dates, Distances and Place
Names List of Maps
Introduction: Europe's Emerging Great Power System
The European States in 1740
The War of Austrian Succession, 1740-1748
The Diplomatic Revolution and the Origins of the Seven Years War, 1748-1756
The Seven Years War 1756-1763
The Eighteenth Century International System
The Transformation of the European System, 1763-1775
Russian Dominance in Eastern Europe, 1775-1795
The Anglo-Bourbon Struggle Overseas and in Europe, 1763-1788
Europe and the French Revolution, 1789-1797
France's Expansion in Europe 1797-1807
Napoleonic Europe 1807-1815
Conclusion: The Eighteenth Century origins of the Nineteenth Century Great Power System Chronology of Principal Events
Bibliographical Essay
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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