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Finding people in early Greece /
Carol G. Thomas.
imprint
Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, c2005.
description
xi, 154 p.
ISBN
0826215777 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, c2005.
isbn
0826215777 (alk. paper)
abstract
"Explores the marriage of historically oriented scholarship and scientific developments in the study of preclassical Greek history. Two figures from preclassical Greece are examined: Jason and the voyage of the Argo, from the Age of Heroes, and Hesiod, who lived during the Age of Revolution"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
5391538
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Carol G. Thomas is Professor of History at the University of Washington in Seattle.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-02-01:
These provocative lectures may have inspired much discussion when presented in 2002 at the University of Missouri, but they have not translated into a good book. Thomas's narration of the development of historical thought about the Greek world over the last half century is so polemical against modernism and postmodernist approaches that it cannot be taken seriously. To counter the perceived dehumanization of history, she presents case studies from prehistoric Greece to illustrate how to reconstruct the lives and experiences of two individuals: the mythical hero Jason and the 8th-century poet Hesiod. Showing that the basic story of Jason and the Argonauts fits what is known about Late Bronze Age society, Thomas (University of Washington) uses Hellenistic literary epic to flesh out the portrayal of Jason. Her reconstruction of Hesiod's life accepts his autobiographical references literally and ignores modern discussions about such references. Her own sources are dated, superseded (in the case of recent archaeological discoveries), or unscholarly (articles from National Geographic). The intended audience is not clear. A poor methodological guide for students and incompletely argued for academics, the book is too detailed and "scholarly" for a popular audience. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. L. P. Day Wabash College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Thomas displays great skill in assembling and interpreting a large variety of evidence that argues in compelling fashion for the main thesis of the book: that it is possible to establish the strong likelihood that individual figures known from much later evidence (Jason) or contemporary writings (Hesiod) were in fact historical. Finding People in Early Greece is a rich historiographical foray into intellectual history, which will provide a useful introduction to the subject for those with little knowledge of it, and an equally valuable discussion for the more informed readers."
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
Choice, February 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Carol Thomas offers two case studies: Jason and the voyage of the Argo, from the 'Age of Heroes,' and Hesiod, probably the first literate European, who lived ca. 700 BCE. With these examples, Thomas shows that scientific tools and historically oriented scholarship can offer a larger context in which individual subjects lived.
Long Description
Progress toward a fuller understanding of preclassical Greece was steady until the 1950s, when a general crisis in all the human-centered disciplines erupted. Scholars undertook a serious reexamination of their tools and data, producing new brands of history, geography, anthropology, archaeology, economics, and sociology. Although these new approaches were widely adopted, the developments also bred a countercurrent beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. The fallout from this backlash was serious in several respects, one of the most important of which was the elimination of the human element in the products of the "new" human-centered disciplines. In Finding People in Early Greece, Carol Thomas addresses these developments and the recent accommodation and rapprochement of the "old" and "new" that has emerged. She then offers two case studies: Jason and the voyage of the Argo, deriving from the "Age of Heroes," and Hesiod, probably the first literate European, who lived ca. 700 BCE during the "Age of Revolution," which catapulted Greece out of its long Dark Age into the vibrant Classical Age. With these two examples, Thomas shows that through a combination of scientific tools and historically oriented scholarship, a larger context in which individual subjects lived can be offered.
Library of Congress Summary
"Explores the marriage of historically oriented scholarship and scientific developments in the study of preclassical Greek history. Two figures from preclassical Greece are examined: Jason and the voyage of the Argo, from the Age of Heroes, and Hesiod, who lived during the Age of Revolution"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Progress toward a fuller understanding of preclassical Greece was steady until the 1950s, when a general crisis in all the human-centered disciplines erupted. Scholars undertook a serious reexamination of their tools and data, producing new brands of history, geography, anthropology, archaeology, economics, and sociology. Although these new approaches were widely adopted, the developments also bred a countercurrent beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. The fallout from this backlash was serious in several respects, one of the most important of which was the elimination of the human element in the products of the "new" human-centered disciplines. InFinding People in Early Greece, Carol Thomas addresses these developments and the recent accommodation and rapprochement of the "old" and "new" that has emerged. She then offers two case studies: Jason and the voyage of theArgo,deriving from the "Age of Heroes," and Hesiod, probably the first literate European, who lived ca. 700 BCE during the "Age of Revolution," which catapulted Greece out of its long Dark Age into the vibrant Classical Age. With these two examples, Thomas shows that through a combination of scientific tools and historically oriented scholarship, a larger context in which individual subjects lived can be offered.
Main Description
Progress toward a fuller understanding of preclassical Greece was steady until the 1950s, when a general crisis in all the human-centered disciplines erupted. Scholars undertook a serious reexamination of their tools and data, producing new brands of history, geography, anthropology, archaeology, economics, and sociology. Although these new approaches were widely adopted, the developments also bred a countercurrent beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. The fallout from this backlash was serious in several respects, one of the most important of which was the elimination of the human element in the products of the “new” human-centered disciplines. In Finding People in Early Greece, Carol Thomas addresses these developments and the recent accommodation and rapprochement of the “old” and “new” that has emerged. She then offers two case studies: Jason and the voyage of the Argo,deriving from the “Age of Heroes,” and Hesiod, probably the first literate European, who lived ca. 700 BCE during the “Age of Revolution,” which catapulted Greece out of its long Dark Age into the vibrant Classical Age. With these two examples, Thomas shows that through a combination of scientific tools and historically oriented scholarship, a larger context in which individual subjects lived can be offered.
Short Annotation
Progress toward a fuller understanding of preclassical Greece was steady until the 1950s, when a general crisis in all the human-centered disciplines erupted. In Finding People in Early Greece, Carol Thomas addresses these developments and the recent accommodation and rapprochement of the "old" and "new" that has emerged.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
History at the Crossroadsp. 1
Launching the Argop. 46
The Birth of the Authorp. 88
Afterwordp. 128
Bibliographyp. 133
Indexp. 147
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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