Catalogue

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Gulf Coast archaeology : the southeastern United States and Mexico /
edited by Nancy Marie White.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2005.
description
xvi, 416 p.
ISBN
0813028086 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2005.
isbn
0813028086 (alk. paper)
general note
Based on a symposium held at the 2001 Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in New Orleans.
catalogue key
5391452
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-05-01:
This book examines an old question in American archaeology: what are the connections between the southeastern US, the Mound Builders, and ancient Mesoamerica? Seventeen scholars explore the issues in 14 chapters that discuss the nature of the environment of the entire Gulf of Mexico region. The contributors rightly point out the impact of modern national and state borders in affecting the issues and clouding or closing scholars' views. Ecological resources, the impact of weather (hurricanes), and the fluctuation of sea levels all give unity to the region. Some essays present new data (evidence of obsidian and some pottery traded between northeast Mexico and Texas), apply Mississippian cultural models to Olmec sites, or clearly summarize the archaeology of the Texas coast. Others restate the similarities of artifacts, mound center layout, and especially iconography. The summary chapter lucidly ties it all together, particularly by pointing out what is shared (e.g., maize agriculture) as well as what is not shared (maize beer). Indeed, the list of what is not shared is impressive. This is a valuable book for all US and Mexican scholars. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. P. J. O'Brien emeritus, Kansas State University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Chronicles archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic to Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, early settlement and sea level rise, and long-distance exchange relations.
Description for Bookstore
"Puts the topic of Mesoamerican contact back on the table. . . . At last, it's okay to look to Mexican cultures for instruction and interpretation of a Pan American belief system."-Cheryl Claassen, Appalachian State University Native peoples living around the Gulf of Mexico had much in common, from the time of the earliest hunter-fisher-gatherers onward. There have been hypotheses of prehistoric interaction between the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, but explorations of the processes have been few. This volume chronicles the archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic through Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, the relationship of early settlement and sea level rise, cultural complexity, early monumental construction, long-distance exchange relations, and symbolism and iconography. Many debatable issues are explored. Northeastern Mexico is a region relatively remote from the Mesoamerican heartland, as is coastal Texas from the southeastern United States. The connecting area of the south Texas/Mexican coast may have been too inhospitable for much habitation, thus inhibiting interaction, yet some artifact types and styles, not to mention food crops, crossed these boundaries. The long-distance diffusion of ideas of sociocultural complexity, food production, and monument construction are reexamined in Gulf Coast Archaeologywith new data and wide geographic prespectives. This book is an important contribution to the hypothesis of prehistoric culture contact and interaction between native groups in North America and Mesoamerica, which has been an openly debated topic over the last century.
Description for Bookstore
"Puts the topic of Mesoamerican contact back on the table. . . . At last, it's okay to look to Mexican cultures for instruction and interpretation of a Pan American belief system."-Cheryl Claassen, Appalachian State University Native peoples living around the Gulf of Mexico had much in common, from the time of the earliest hunter-fisher-gatherers onward. There have been hypotheses of prehistoric interaction between the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, but explorations of the processes have been few. This volume chronicles the archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic through Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, the relationship of early settlement and sea level rise, cultural complexity, early monumental construction, long-distance exchange relations, and symbolism and iconography. Many debatable issues are explored. Northeastern Mexico is a region relatively remote from the Mesoamerican heartland, as is coastal Texas from the southeastern United States. The connecting area of the south Texas/Mexican coast may have been too inhospitable for much habitation, thus inhibiting interaction, yet some artifact types and styles, not to mention food crops, crossed these boundaries. The long-distance diffusion of ideas of sociocultural complexity, food production, and monument construction are reexamined inGulf Coast Archaeologywith new data and wide geographic prespectives. This book is an important contribution to the hypothesis of prehistoric culture contact and interaction between native groups in North America and Mesoamerica, which has been an openly debated topic over the last century.
Description for Bookstore
“Puts the topic of Mesoamerican contact back on the table. . . . At last, it’s okay to look to Mexican cultures for instruction and interpretation of a Pan American belief system.”-Cheryl Claassen, Appalachian State University Native peoples living around the Gulf of Mexico had much in common, from the time of the earliest hunter-fisher-gatherers onward. There have been hypotheses of prehistoric interaction between the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, but explorations of the processes have been few. This volume chronicles the archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic through Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, the relationship of early settlement and sea level rise, cultural complexity, early monumental construction, long-distance exchange relations, and symbolism and iconography. Many debatable issues are explored. Northeastern Mexico is a region relatively remote from the Mesoamerican heartland, as is coastal Texas from the southeastern United States. The connecting area of the south Texas/Mexican coast may have been too inhospitable for much habitation, thus inhibiting interaction, yet some artifact types and styles, not to mention food crops, crossed these boundaries. The long-distance diffusion of ideas of sociocultural complexity, food production, and monument construction are reexamined in Gulf Coast Archaeologywith new data and wide geographic prespectives. This book is an important contribution to the hypothesis of prehistoric culture contact and interaction between native groups in North America and Mesoamerica, which has been an openly debated topic over the last century.
Long Description
Native peoples living around the Gulf of Mexico had much in common, from the time of the earliest hunter-fisher-gatherers onward. there have been hypotheses of prehistoric interaction between the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, but explorations of the processes have been few. This volume chronicles the archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic, through Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, the relationship of early settlement and sea level rise, cultural complexity, early monumental construction, long-distance exchange relations, and symbolism and iconography. Many debatable issues are explored. Northeastern Mexico is a region relatively remote from the Mesoamerican heartland, as is coastal Texas from the southeastern United States. The connecting area of the south Texas/Mexican coast may have been too inhospitable for much habitation, thus inhibiting interaction, yet some artifact types and styles, not to mention food crops, crossed these boundaries. The long-distance diffusion of ideas of sociocultural complexity, food production, and monument construction are reexamined in "Gulf Coast Archaeology with new data and wide geographic perspectives. This book is and important contribution to the hypothesis of prehistoric culture contact and interaction between native groups in North American and Mesoamerica, which has been an openly debated topic over the last century.
Main Description
Native peoples living around the Gulf of Mexico had much in common, from the time of the earliest hunter-fisher-gatherers onward. There have been hypotheses of prehistoric interaction between the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, but explorations of the processes have been few. This volume chronicles the archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic through Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, the relationship of early settlement and sea level rise, cultural complexity, early monumental construction, long-distance exchange relations, and symbolism and iconography. Many debatable issues are explored. Northeastern Mexico is a region relatively remote from the Mesoamerican heartland, as is coastal Texas from the southeastern United States. The connecting area of the south Texas/Mexican coast may have been too inhospitable for much habitation, thus inhibiting interaction, yet some artifact types and styles, not to mention food crops, crossed these boundaries. The long-distance diffusion of ideas of sociocultural complexity, food production, and monument construction are reexamined in Gulf Coast Archaeologywith new data and wide geographic prespectives. This book is an important contribution to the hypothesis of prehistoric culture contact and interaction between native groups in North America and Mesoamerica, which has been an openly debated topic over the last century.
Main Description
Native peoples living around the Gulf of Mexico had much in common, from the time of the earliest hunter-fisher-gatherers onward. There have been hypotheses of prehistoric interaction between the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, but explorations of the processes have been few. This volume chronicles the archaeological continuities and discontinuities along the Gulf Coast from Archaic through Postclassic/Mississippian times and later, including shell mounds/middens and estuarine adaptations, subsistence similarities, the relationship of early settlement and sea level rise, cultural complexity, early monumental construction, long-distance exchange relations, and symbolism and iconography. Many debatable issues are explored. Northeastern Mexico is a region relatively remote from the Mesoamerican heartland, as is coastal Texas from the southeastern United States. The connecting area of the south Texas/Mexican coast may have been too inhospitable for much habitation, thus inhibiting interaction, yet some artifact types and styles, not to mention food crops, crossed these boundaries. The long-distance diffusion of ideas of sociocultural complexity, food production, and monument construction are reexamined inGulf Coast Archaeologywith new data and wide geographic prespectives. This book is an important contribution to the hypothesis of prehistoric culture contact and interaction between native groups in North America and Mesoamerica, which has been an openly debated topic over the last century.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Tablesp. xii
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Prehistoric Connections around the Gulf Coastp. 1
Rivers in the Sea: The Gulf of Mexico as a Cultural Corridor in Antiquityp. 56
A New Look at the Gulf Coast Formativep. 68
Mound Builders along the Coast of the Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern United Statesp. 87
Sea-Level Rise and Fluctuation on the Central Texas Coast: Exploring Cultural and Ecological Correlatesp. 108
Dumps and Piles: Site Structure and Settlement Patterning on the Mid and Upper Texas Gulf Coastp. 155
Late Holocene Environments and the Archaeological Record of the South Texas Coastp. 178
Broader Continental Connections through the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texasp. 197
Paleoagriculture on the Gulf Coast: Two Possible Cases of the Classic Period, Central Veracruz, Mexicop. 205
Perspectives on Variation in Olmec Settlement and Polity Using Mississippian Modelsp. 223
Characteristic Elements Shared by Northeastern Mexico and the Southeastern United Statesp. 245
Wind Jewels and Paddling Gods: The Mississippian Southeast in the Postclassic Mesoamerican Worldp. 260
The American Formative Revisitedp. 281
Discontinuities, Common Foundations, Short-Distance Interactions, and Sporadic Long-Distance Connections around the Gulf of Mexicop. 304
Bibliographyp. 321
List of Contributorsp. 387
Indexp. 389
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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