Catalogue


Portraits of industry : the culture of work in the industrial paintings of Howard L. Worner and their use in arts education /
Lorie A. Annarella.
imprint
Lanham, MD : University Press of America, c2004.
description
v, 97 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
076182958X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, MD : University Press of America, c2004.
isbn
076182958X
catalogue key
5381404
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 93-96).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lorie A. Annarella is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, Illinois.
Reviews
Review Quotes
The theme of this book aptly depicts the manner in which industrial artist Howard L. Worner approached and executed his artwork throughout our lengthy business and personal relationship. Its writings complement well the Wean Collection of his paintings, which encompasses an extensive amount of industrial art, and is housed in The Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
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Summaries
Long Description
The fourteen paintings reviewed in this study chronicle industrial artist Howard L. Worner's interpretation of the steel industry. By employing ethnographic techniques to his art, Worner contributed much to the understanding of the 'culture of work.' Worner identified closely with the occupational community he was painting by becoming an observer as well as a participant. Over time, he developed a rapport with the community and an acute understanding of its environmental processes. Worner used vibrant color, on-location painting, and a deep understanding of his subject to powerfully depict the rich culture of the steel mills. This book will provide students of art education a better understanding of the genre through artistic ethnography and interpretation, as well as an excellent overview of industrial art.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. v
Web page referencep. vi
Why Study Industrial Art?p. 1
Background of Industrial Paintingp. 11
Representation of Culture in the Paintingsp. 21
The Artist's Values in His Life and Workp. 57
The Artist as Ethnographerp. 67
Applying Arts in Educationp. 75
Bibliographyp. 93
About the Authorp. 97
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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