Catalogue


Law on the screen /
edited by Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas, Martha Merrill Umphrey.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2005.
description
264 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0804751625 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2005.
isbn
0804751625 (alk. paper)
contents note
On film and law : broadening the focus / Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas, and Martha Merrill Umphrey -- Cinematic judgment and jurisprudence : a woman's memory, recovery, and justice in a post-traumatic society (a study of Polanski's Death and the maiden) / Orit Kamir -- The racial-spatial order and the law : Devil in a blue dress / Michael J. Shapiro -- Anti-oedipus, lynch : initiatory rites and the ordeal of justice / Richard K. Sherwin -- Reproducing a trial : evidence and its assessment in Paradise lost / Jennifer L. Mnookin -- A case for corrective criticism : A civil action / Diane Waldman -- "Everyone went wild over it" : film audiences, political cinema, and Mr. Smith goes to Washington / Eric Smoodin.
general note
Essays originally presented at a conference entitled Law's Moving Image, held April 11-12, 2003, at Amherst College.
catalogue key
5378885
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The proliferation of images of law, legal processes, and officials on television and in film is a phenomenon of enormous significance. Mass-mediated images are as powerful, pervasive, and important as are other early twenty-first-century social forces--e.g. globalization, neo-colonialism, and human rights--in shaping and transforming legal life. Yet scholars have only recently begun to examine how law works in this new arena and to explore the consequences of the representation of law in the moving image. Law on the Screen advances our understanding of the connection between law and film by analyzing them as narrative forms, examining film for its jurisprudential content--that is, its ways of critiquing the present legal world and imagining an alternative one--and expanding studies of the representation of law in film to include questions of reception.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-11-01:
This collection is from a 2003 conference at Amherst. The editors begin with an essay that shows how the collection is organized. There are three themes. First is law as narrative. Stories about law in print as well as on the big or small screen tell stories. The lessons we take from these stories may or may not completely conform to "real life" (cinematic jurisprudence, see below). The essays are subsequently divided into two parts, each linking the first with the other two themes. The authors in part 2 discuss what the editors call "studies of representation," which focus not only on narrative but also on what they call cinematic jurisprudence. What are the fundamental values of society and how are they (or not) protected on the screen compared with what really would most likely happen is the second theme. The authors in part 2 concentrate on the third theme, which is reception: how audiences receive the messages. Films may have layered meanings, some to be misread. The last film discussed, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, can be read and the film viewed with contemporary events in mind. Viewing the films helps in understanding the essays. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. S. Mann College of Charleston
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This collection will serve as a highly relevant and timely introduction to the kinds of nuanced and thoughtful analyses that can be generated in the study of the relationship between law and film. For those more familiar with cultural studies and analyses of law and film, the volume presents essays that approach the area in stimulatingly diverse ways, raising new questions about law, the legal institution, and cultural representations of law and justice."Alison Young, University of Melbourne
"This collection will serve as a highly relevant and timely introduction to the kinds of nuanced and thoughtful analyses that can be generated in the study of the relationship between law and film. For those more familiar with cultural studies and analyses of law and film, the volume presents essays that approach the area in stimulatingly diverse ways, raising new questions about law, the legal institution, and cultural representations of law and justice."--Alison Young, University of Melbourne
"The great strength of Law on the Screen lies in its insightful jurisprudential readings of films previously unconsidered by law and film scholars, as well as its innovative focus on reception. This collection offers a sophisticated and challenging analysis of filmic representations of law, making it a very welcome contribution to the emerging field of law and film studies. These essays represent a real coming of age of law and film scholarship."Professor Leslie J. Moran, School of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London
"The great strength of Law on the Screenlies in its insightful jurisprudential readings of films previously unconsidered by law and film scholars, as well as its innovative focus on reception. This collection offers a sophisticated and challenging analysis of filmic representations of law, making it a very welcome contribution to the emerging field of law and film studies. These essays represent a real coming of age of law and film scholarship."--Professor Leslie J. Moran, School of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
Choice, November 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The proliferation of images of law, legal processes, and officials on television and in film is a phenomenon of enormous significance. Mass-mediated images are as powerful, pervasive, and important as are other early twenty-first-century social forcese.g. globalization, neo-colonialism, and human rightsin shaping and transforming legal life. Yet scholars have only recently begun to examine how law works in this new arena and to explore the consequences of the representation of law in the moving image. Law on the Screen advances our understanding of the connection between law and film by analyzing them as narrative forms, examining film for its jurisprudential contentthat is, its ways of critiquing the present legal world and imagining an alternative oneand expanding studies of the representation of law in film to include questions of reception.
Main Description
The proliferation of images of law, legal processes, and officials on television and in film is a phenomenon of enormous significance. Mass-mediated images are as powerful, pervasive, and important as are other early twenty-first-century social forces--e.g. globalization, neo-colonialism, and human rights--in shaping and transforming legal life. Yet scholars have only recently begun to examine how law works in this new arena and to explore the consequences of the representation of law in the moving image. Law on the Screenadvances our understanding of the connection between law and film by analyzing them as narrative forms, examining film for its jurisprudential content--that is, its ways of critiquing the present legal world and imagining an alternative one--and expanding studies of the representation of law in film to include questions of reception.
Back Cover Copy
"The great strength of Law on the Screen lies in its insightful jurisprudential readings of films previously unconsidered by law and film scholars, as well as its innovative focus on reception. This collection offers a sophisticated and challenging analysis of filmic representations of law, making it a very welcome contribution to the emerging field of law and film studies. These essays represent a real coming of age of law and film scholarship."--Professor Leslie J. Moran, School of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London "This collection will serve as a highly relevant and timely introduction to the kinds of nuanced and thoughtful analyses that can be generated in the study of the relationship between law and film. For those more familiar with cultural studies and analyses of law and film, the volume presents essays that approach the area in stimulatingly diverse ways, raising new questions about law, the legal institution, and cultural representations of law and justice."--Alison Young, University of Melbourne
Back Cover Copy
"The great strength of Law on the Screen lies in its insightful jurisprudential readings of films previously unconsidered by law and film scholars, as well as its innovative focus on reception. This collection offers a sophisticated and challenging analysis of filmic representations of law, making it a very welcome contribution to the emerging field of law and film studies. These essays represent a real coming of age of law and film scholarship."Professor Leslie J. Moran, School of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London "This collection will serve as a highly relevant and timely introduction to the kinds of nuanced and thoughtful analyses that can be generated in the study of the relationship between law and film. For those more familiar with cultural studies and analyses of law and film, the volume presents essays that approach the area in stimulatingly diverse ways, raising new questions about law, the legal institution, and cultural representations of law and justice."Alison Young, University of Melbourne
Table of Contents
On Film and Law: Broadening the Focusp. 1
Cinematic Judgment and Jurisprudence: a Woman's Memory, Recovery, and Justice in a Post-Traumatic Society (A Study of Polanski's Death and the Maiden)p. 27
The Racial-Spatial Order and the Law: Devil in a Blue Dressp. 82
Anti-Oedipus, Lynch: Initiatory Rites and the Ordeal of Justicep. 106
Reproducing a Trial: Evidence and Its Assessment in Paradise Lostp. 153
A Case for Corrective Criticism: a Civil Actionp. 201
"everyone Went Wild Over It": Film Audiences, Political Cinema, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washingtonp. 231
Indexp. 255
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem