Catalogue


The shamrock and the shield : an oral history of the Irish in Montreal /
Patricia Burns.
edition
3rd. rev. printing.
imprint
Montréal : Véhicule Press, c2005.
description
202 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1550651099 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montréal : Véhicule Press, c2005.
isbn
1550651099 :
general note
Third revised printing,
catalogue key
5372433
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A story well told ... and expertly edited." - Canadian Book Review Annual "History comes alive with Burns' use of oral history. For those of us with Irish ancestors in early Montreal, you'll certainly appreciate this treasure trove of stories." -Trish Hopkins, Family History News "The Shamrock and the Shield is a book to savour." - Nora Marsh, Canadian Content
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In the Shamrock and the Shield Patricia Burns presents the colourful story of the Irish in Montreal. This oral history makes the past come alive by putting a human face on the bare facts of history. Burns grew up in Montreal listening to her grandparents and parents relating tales of men freezing to death on sealing ships and of rum-runners being killed by police. In the spirit of these stories she recorded the memories of Irish men and women from all walks of life, many of whom grew up in the working class Irish community of Griffintown. The lives chronicled in The Shamrock and the Shield exemplify the richness and diversity of Montreal's Irish heritage.
Main Description
Although there have been some Irish living in Montreal since the early 1600s, augmented by Irish soldiers arriving with the conquering British army, it was only in the early 1800s that an Irish presence was truly noticed. By 1824 there were sufficient Irish in Montreal to organize the first St. Patrick's Day Parade, and ten years later the St. Patrick's Society was founded. In 1847 St. Patrick's Basilica, Montreal's first church built for the Irish Catholics opened--a year before thousands of sick Irish escaping the famine in Ireland arrived.To remember history demonstrates pride in our heritage. Oral history makes our past come alive by putting a human face on bare facts. Patricia Burns grew up in Montreal listening to her grandparents and parents relating tales of men freezing to death on sailing ships and of rum-runners being killed by police. Remembering these stories, she has continued the tradition, and since 1991 she has been recording the memories of men and women from all walks of life, many who grew up in the working class community of Griffintown.
Main Description
Although there have been some Irish living in Montreal since the early 1600's, augmented by Irish soldiers arriving with the conquering British army, it was only in the early 1800's that an Irish presence was truly noticed. By 1824 there were sufficient Irish in Montreal to organize the first St. Patrick's Day Parade, and ten years later the St. Patrick's Society was founded. In 1847 St. Patrick's Basilica, Montreal's first church built for the Irish Catholics opened--a year before thousands of sick Irish escaping the famine in Ireland arrived.
Main Description
Although there have been some Irish living in Montreal since the early 1600s, augmented by Irish soldiers arriving with the conquering British army, it was only in the early 1800s that an Irish presence was truly noticed. By 1824 there were sufficient Irish in Montreal to organize the first St. Patrick's Day Parade, and ten years later the St. Patrick's Society was founded. In 1847 St. Patrick's Basilica, Montreal's first church built for the Irish Catholics opened--a year before thousands of sick Irish escaping the famine in Ireland arrived. To remember history demonstrates pride in our heritage. Oral history makes our past come alive by putting a human face on bare facts. Patricia Burns grew up in Montreal listening to her grandparents and parents relating tales of men freezing to death on sailing ships and of rum-runners being killed by police. Remembering these stories, she has continued the tradition, and since 1991 she has been recording the memories of men and women from all walks of life, many who grew up in the working class community of Griffintown.

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